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I've got two NICs in my Windows 8 Pro (x64) box each connected to different networks. I would like to release and renew the DHCP lease for just one of the NICs. So far I can't find any way to do it within the ipconfig command.

Is this possible? (perhaps another command or GUI even)

Similar question here, however I'm asking specifically about release/renew functionality.

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Yes you can do this. If you look at ipconfig /? you will see the option for ipconfig /renew [adapter] and ipconfig /release [adapter]. So you just need to know the adapter name by typing ipconfig by itself.

  • Thanks, the /? is good to know. – Brack Jun 13 '13 at 14:25
  • Windows 10 adds crap to the adapter name that it shows in ipconfig. For instance, ipconfig shows me an entry for Wireless LAN adapter Wi-Fi but the adapter name that you would supply to ipconfig /renew is just Wi-Fi. Remember that it also supports wildcard matches, so I can type ipconfig /renew *Fi which works just as well. – LinuxDisciple Nov 18 '16 at 3:54
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ipconfig /release "adapter name"
ipconfig /renew "adapter name"
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The name shown by ipconfig is - strangely - not the name you supply to the renew and reconfig options, so get the NetConnectionID of the NIC using this command in a command window to show you the necessary id to use in the next command, matching the MAC address if necessary:

C:\>wmic nic get Name,NetConnectionID,MACAddress
MACAddress         Name                                        NetConnectionID
                   Microsoft Kernel Debug Network Adapter
F8:CA:B8:55:7F:A3  Intel(R) Ethernet Connection (3) I218-LM    Ethernet
10:02:B5:82:71:16  Intel(R) Dual Band Wireless-AC 7265         Wi-Fi
10:02:B5:82:71:1A  Bluetooth Device (Personal Area Network)    Bluetooth Network Connection

Then use the name in an ipconfig command such as:

C:\> ipconfig /release Wi-Fi
C:\> ipconfig /renew Wi-Fi

In the example above, ipconfig shows the name Wireless LAN adapter Wi-Fi, but the name to use with ipconfig is just Wi-Fi as discovered from the wmic command.

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