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I am buying a HP laptop i.e. Probook 4540s the screen resolution that is by default offered by this machine is 1366 x 768, however I have also chosen to upgrade it and get a 2gb ATI Radeon card in it.

My question with a separate graphics card like above will it allow me to use higher screen resolutions like 1600 or 1920 etc.? Because as per my understanding when you have graphics card all display is handled by it?

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    If you combine both answers from Yassarikham768 and ernie, you've got your answer. Current resolution is limited by the LCD panel when displaying on the LCD panel in the laptop. However, connecting to an external display will allow you to increase the resolution to the limit of the video chipset in the laptop, provided it does not exceed the resolution capabilities of the external display. Kapiche? – Bon Gart Sep 11 '13 at 19:59
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If the glass doesn't physically have the pixels, a better video card won't help with resolution - this is similar to the idea that an old tube TV can't show HD content at full resolution, even if you hook up a Bluray player

A better video card may help with frame rate, 3D, and color depth, or with driving an external display (which could be driven at a higher resolution than the native, laptop display).

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You won't be able to increase the resolution. The screen resolution is limited to 1366 x 768 and any upgrade will not make a difference to the laptops ability to render a higher resolution (on the laptop itself).

However, depending on the other attributes of the card you might see a significant improvement in terms of FPS (Frames Per Second)

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Resolution is handled by graphics card and is limited to the resolutions offered by the display. For instance, you can have a monitor whose limit is 1366 x 768 and a graphics card whose limit is 1920 x 1080, the highest you can get is 1366 x 768. If you plug it into an HDTV and disable the built in display, your resolution will be 1920 x 1080.

You can have a smaller resolution on a higher monitor, but never a higher resolution on a lower monitor.

Here's a good way to remember it: think of your resolution like water, and your monitor like a bucket. You can always put less water in the bucket, but you can never put more water in than the bucket is physically capable of holding.

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