22

ping packets is a type of ICMP packets.Is there any relation between ICMP with TCP.In other can we guaranty their arrival in the network I want to know ICMP packets in the network is tcp or udp or which one or non of them?

19

Is there any relation between ICMP with TCP

Not directly. ICMP is IP protocol 1, TCP is IP protocol 6. Other common IP protocols are 17 (udp) and 47 (gre).

In other can we guaranty their arrival in the network

Typically ICMP is not sent within any type of framework that uses acknowledgements and timeouts like TCP does. So the answer here is no.

I want to know ICMP packets in the network is tcp or udp or which one or non of them?

None of them. It behaves mostly like udp but it's not designed to transport data. There is no "link" or session created with ICMP, it's typically a very simple request-response, if that. You could "hack" ICMP to trade data over echo ICMP packets if you really wanted to.

  • So if it doesn't use TCP, if an ICMP packet is lost, how would you know? – Pacerier Jun 16 '17 at 10:43
  • You simply assume after a timeout period that you will not get a response and that no one is on the other end. – LawrenceC Jun 16 '17 at 12:17
10

None of them – they're sent directly over IP. ICMP packets are mainly used for network control, i. e. between routers or ping and many other uses.

  • is there any guaranty for that? assume your ICMP packet last in the link – Mohammad Reza Rezwani Nov 11 '13 at 22:13
  • It doesn't matter as it's a totally different protocol and the most routers and firewalls handle it differently.In the Wikipedia article for ICMP you can read the following: ICMP differs from transport protocols such as TCP and UDP in that it is not typically used to exchange data between systems, nor is it regularly employed by end-user network applications (with the exception of some diagnostic tools like ping and traceroute) -> en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Internet_Control_Message_Protocol – noggerl Nov 11 '13 at 22:16
  • 5
    @alex: The ICMP protocol doesn't provide for guaranteed delivery. Given the kinds of tasks it performs that wouldn't be possible anyway (e.g sending an ICMP echo request to the IP-address of a server that is down) – RedGrittyBrick Nov 11 '13 at 22:31

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.