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I'm going to purchase a GPU which is for PCI-e 3.0. But since I don't know what PCI-e slot it is in my computer I need to find it out somehow. Is it possible to find it from the terminal in linux?

  • 1
    Not asked, but nice to know: A PCI-e v3 card will run fine on an PCI-e v2 slot. – Hennes Apr 23 '14 at 18:41
16

Using lspci -vv, you can get the transfer rate and compare it with the transfer rate specified for the revisions. A sample output would read:

# lspci -vv | grep -E 'PCI bridge|LnkCap'
00:02.0 PCI bridge: NVIDIA Corporation C51 PCI Express Bridge (rev a1) (prog-if 00 [Normal decode])
                LnkCap: Port #2, Speed 2.5GT/s, Width x1, ASPM L0s L1, Latency L0 <512ns, L1 <4us
00:03.0 PCI bridge: NVIDIA Corporation C51 PCI Express Bridge (rev a1) (prog-if 00 [Normal decode])
                LnkCap: Port #1, Speed 2.5GT/s, Width x1, ASPM L0s L1, Latency L0 <512ns, L1 <4us
00:04.0 PCI bridge: NVIDIA Corporation C51 PCI Express Bridge (rev a1) (prog-if 00 [Normal decode])
                LnkCap: Port #0, Speed 2.5GT/s, Width x16, ASPM L0s L1, Latency L0 <512ns, L1 <4us
00:10.0 PCI bridge: NVIDIA Corporation MCP51 PCI Bridge (rev a2) (prog-if 01 [Subtractive decode])

Which shows that the speed here is 2.5GT/s, corresponding to PCIe 1.x.

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    This needs to run as root; without it, lspci silently prints Capabilities: <access denied>, which is removed by the grep. – FauxFaux Jul 5 '17 at 19:29
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    That's what the # means. – goetzc Aug 13 '17 at 23:12
9

You can use the "dmidecode" command to give an in depth list of all the hardware on the system and then view that. I did a "quick and dirty" command to show the pertinent bit as follows:

dmidecode | grep "PCI"

Which returned

PCI is supported
Type: x16 PCI Express 2 x8
Type: x8 PCI Express 2 x4
Type: x8 PCI Express 2 x4
Type: x8 PCI Express 2 x4
Type: 32-bit PCI
  • 3
    dmidecode --type 9 can also be used to filter while keeping the rest of the information. – BenC Jan 19 '16 at 2:24

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