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I currently have a few static IPs set in my router and I'm wondering if there is any way that i can access/ping/refer to them via a DNS request (i.e. instead of 192.168.0.8 use something like "RapberryPi") that way I don't have to always remember the IP address. I know that this can be done if i setup a server within the NAT but I will like to implemented at the router level. Do routers usually have a "host" file or something of that sort?

marked as duplicate by Ƭᴇcʜιᴇ007, Kevin Panko, random Jan 9 '14 at 20:10

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  • As-is this is kind of broad - "Usually" routers do not have a hosts file or DNS server services, as they are routers. So we'd need to know some info from you... Like what have you tried already? What router? Have you checked with your router's specs/manufacturer to see if it supports this out-of-the box? Have you checked 3rd party firmwares to see if they'll work with your router, and if the have a DNS solution? Have you seen Setting up a router as a DNS server only yet? – Ƭᴇcʜιᴇ007 Jan 7 '14 at 19:20
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You can do this with your windows host file located here: %SystemRoot%\system32\drivers\etc\hosts. This would have to be done on each machine you want to be able to access the alias from.

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