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I understand that moving a platter hard drive around while its writing data is very unhealthy and can easily corrupt the data being written. Since a SSD has no moving parts, is it safe to freely move if it's writing data?

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I understand that moving a platter hard drive around while its writing data is very unhealthy and can easily corrupt the data being written.

Corruption is the least of it. The drive head floats on a cushion of air just a few nanometers above the platters, and the disk spins at thousands of RPM. Scott Mueller compared this to a jumbo-jet flying about a foot above the ground. While hard-drives are designed to be tolerant of a little movement, a little too much agitation could cause a head crash which can gouge out a chunk of the platter! (See some disturbing photos on Google Images.)

Since a SSD has no moving parts, is it safe to freely move if it's writing data?

That’s one of the primary benefits of an SSD. Because it has no moving parts, it is not at risk of any sort of physical damage from movement. An SSD (usually) uses flash technology which has been used for years in all kinds of devices which people have never even though about damaging from moving such as some game cartridges and memory packs for old game consoles, memory cards for cameras, and USB flash-drives.

Is walking around with my SSD laptop turned on harmful to it?

You could still damage the SSD and/or the laptop if you throw or drop it, but simply holding it while walking is fine.

That said, keep an eye out for other factors however such as heat and direct sunlight; too much of those could cause trouble.

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Yes, you are absolutely correct, you can move with an SSD even if it is writing.

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This is definitely promotional material but it delivers the point: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PlISf5pnTLI

The video successfully demonstrates a mechanical hard drive's vulnerability to shock. A mechanical drive is mounted to a paint shaker. Our host is playing a video from said mounted hard drive and turns on the paint shaker. After a few seconds of playing the video from memory the next portion of the video is unobtainable, the hard drive has been rendered useless.

If the shock is strong enough, the drive may encounter a head crash. This is where the drive's mechanical arm will carve or literally crash into the hard drive's magnetic platter. Another instance of failure resulting from shock is the click of death. The click of death is a clicking noise that indicates either a crash or a failure.

An SSD on the other hand lacks these mechanical moving parts making saving itself from most forms of physical shock. For the next half of the video the host mounts a SSD to the paint shaker and successfully demonstrates the SSD's shock resistance.

The video unfortunately only demonstrates a read but basically delivers the point that you could get away with moving an active SSD.

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    Could you perhaps summarize what the video shows? – slhck Jan 8 '14 at 19:42
  • Yup! I've added a fairly complete description of the video. – VitaminYes Jan 9 '14 at 22:37

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