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I have first set up port forwarding on my Router. This was successful. My Router's IP (on the Modem's subnet) is 10.0.0.2. Visiting 10.0.0.2 does forward to 192.168.1.10, which is my local server.

I then enabled port forwarding on my modem on port 80 to 10.0.0.2.

Even though the port is "open", it can't be access by the public IP.

Am I doing something wrong?

EDIT: The Modem's IP is 10.0.0.1, and the Router's IP is 10.0.0.2. I forwarded the Modem to the Router and it still doesn't work. My public IP is different...

migrated from serverfault.com Jan 12 '14 at 0:27

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  • The description of your problem does not makes sense. Neither ip address you claim you are using is valid outside of your network. The behavior you describe sounds like the port forward actually is working. – Ramhound Jan 12 '14 at 1:07
  • I am slightly confused by your question. Are you saying that 10.0.0.2 is your public IP? I'm not familiar with Comcast, but I presume your router connects to Comcast over your modem using PPPoE. – yjwong Jan 12 '14 at 1:12
  • The Modem's IP is 10.0.0.1, and the Router's IP is 10.0.0.2. I forwarded the Modem to the Router and it still doesn't work. My public IP is different... – Griffen Jan 12 '14 at 1:30
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99% of home/cheap routers to not allow You to connect from internal IP to external forwarded port to internal IP. So from "inside" it will look like it is not working.

That kind of nat used to be called hairpin NAT.

Try from "outside" ask someone to try connect.

  • Wow I didn't know that! I connected to the IP from a computer on a different network and it worked, just not from computers on the same network… Thanks! – Griffen Jan 12 '14 at 1:33
  • @Ramhound Yes you can forward from unless outside->router->inside. This Wont work on 99% home cheap routers: inside->router->inside. – Bartłomiej Zarzecki Jan 12 '14 at 1:41
  • @Ramhound - I think you misread the answer - I agree that the stats seem incorrect and should be referenced, but it is common that by default you cannot access yourself in this type of situation and additional configuration is likely required. – nerdwaller Jan 12 '14 at 1:44

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