7

I wanted to get the serial number assigned by Hard disk manufacturer.

The serial number is usually printed in the hard disk. Normally to get the serial number, I have to take out the hard disk.

Is it possible to know the hard drive serial number from command prompt or in other way.

Before posting this question I have gone through this question but I am getting the error in the following screenshot:

enter image description here

2

CrystalDiskInfo will display this information as well as all other S.M.A.R.T. data if the computer supports it. It's free, check it out.

If this is unable to pull the serial number then I would double check your BIOS settings and make sure that you have S.M.A.R.T. enabled.

If this is not an option I'd Google the computer model specs to see if there is a BIOS update that supports it, if not then the computer is too old and you have to open the machine.

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8

The Win32_PhysicalMedia class suggest that

wmic path win32_physicalmedia get SerialNumber

should do the trick.

However, the WMI struct holding the DiskDrive information

http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/aa394132%28v=vs.85%29.aspx

specifically mentions that

SerialNumber: Number allocated by the manufacturer to identify the physical media.

Windows Server 2003 and Windows XP: This property is not available.

I know of no other way to obtain it, sorry.

Cheers,

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4

Press Windows Key + R

type

msinfo32.exe

It will show details of almost everything in the system. Locate to storage and find the details.

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  • Also on Windows XP? – Anders R. Bystrup Jan 28 '14 at 14:06
  • Yea. Think so. I have used it on Windows 7. – Unnikrishnan Jan 28 '14 at 14:08
  • Thanks for answering,+1 I did the way you suggested but the I am not getting the manufacturer serial number. – SpringLearner Jan 29 '14 at 4:21
3

Use below powershell script to get the serial number of hard disk.

Get-WmiObject Win32_PhysicalMedia | Format-Table Tag, SerialNumber

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  • Does this work on Windows XP also? – Anders R. Bystrup Jan 28 '14 at 14:07
  • I don't think it will work on Win XP. On XP you can use this command - wmic diskdrive get serialnumber – Calculating Machine Jan 28 '14 at 14:09
  • 1
    Make sure to open PowerShell as administrator. Running it in it's regular mode will not give you the correct serial number. – user383088 Oct 23 '14 at 21:01
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    This works fine on Windows XP (64-bit) with PowerShell 2.0 installed. And yes, it is actually possible to install PowerShell 2.0 on Windows XP 64-bit. – Peter Mortensen Jul 29 '15 at 17:16
2

If you can't just pull the drive out then try:

Start > Control Panel > System > Device Manager

Expand the Disk Drive and right click the HDD you want. Select Properties > Details Tab. From the drop down select Hardware IDs. It should be listed in there.

EDIT: Since it was different in device manager you could try cmd command:

wmic diskdrive get serialnumber

See if this matches.

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  • Thanks for answering I tried your way but the number I get from device manager and the number printed on the hard drive does not match – SpringLearner Jan 28 '14 at 13:04
0

It availaible in WindowsXP, you need use command

wmic diskdrive get pnpdeviceid

you receive something like this

KINGSTON SV300S37A60G IDE\DISKKINGSTON_SV300S37A60G___________________580ABBF0\3035323042363237423436304335393820202020

where last long number (3035323042363237423436304335393820202020) it's serial number in Hex.
After you getting this number, try to use this program or python-script to view correct SN.
Thanks.

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  • When you say "It availaible in WindowsXP" did you really mean "It" or did you mean another or different word in its place? – Pimp Juice IT Jul 13 '17 at 15:30
  • Another word, "This availaible in WindowsXP". – Max Jul 14 '17 at 7:22

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