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I am looking at some completely undocumented code that implements some kind of symmetric encryption and at a loss as to how to identify what exactly it does. The person who wrote it is not available for clarification but being familiar with their work I am almost certain that they didn't write the implementation themselves, so there's a good chance it's something standard they copy/pasted from somewhere. Google didn't provide any leads, and the only hint I have -- the function's name is RSAcrypt -- seems to be trolling rather than helpful (there is nothing even remotely resembling asymmetric crypto going on).

Is there a program or website that provides the output of multiple symmetric ciphers for a given plaintext and key in easily browsable (e.g. tabular) form so that I can identify the cipher based on its output?

For example, this website allows visitors to hash an arbitrary input and see the output of several hash functions. This would allow one to identify an unknown algorithm that hashes the input Test to 0cbc6611f5540bd0809a388dc95a615b as being MD5. What I want is something similar for symmetric crypto.

closed as off-topic by Daniel Beck Feb 5 '14 at 11:32

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  • You should rephrase your question (How to identify an unknown, but common crypto function), otherwise you risk your question beeing closed as off-topic: "Questions seeking product, service, or learning material recommendations are off-topic because they become outdated quickly and attract opinion-based answers." – mpy Feb 5 '14 at 11:33
  • @mpy: I 'm not sure if that would really be an improvement. "How to identify" is not hard to answer: encrypt with 30 common algos and see if you recognize the output. In essence I would still be asking for the same thing: a shortcut that doesn't require me to write a throwaway program that does this. Don't you agree? – Jon Feb 5 '14 at 11:38

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