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I have recently switched from Virtual Box to VMWare Player for running several system on my home server. The issue I have is when running 3 virtual systems at once, when I return to my computer one of them (not always the same one) will have shutdown after starting and running for a period without issue.

I am running Ubuntu 12.04 as host and 3 instances of VMWare Player. Two instances run Ubunutu 12.04 as a Cloud and Test system while the third runs Ubunutu Server 12.04 as a local Samba server. Each system runs 512MB memory on a 2GB host.

Only thing I can think of is not enough memory for the host, but I would imagine the system wouldn't boot if this was the case. I really haven't done enough work with VMWare Player to know at this point and I can't find anything related on the internet.

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VMWare Player optimizes memory allocation, so as to allocate only as much memory as required by the VM. It will even liberate unused memory, called memory trimming.

So it is possible that all the VMs started well but that memory was exhausted after some time. I have no knowledge of what VMWare does in that case and if it will then close down one VM.

To disable memory trimming for a particular guest, add the following line to the virtual machine configuration (.vmx) file:

MemTrimRate=0 

This option is also available via the menu VM > Settings > Options > Avanced > Disable memory page trimming.

I suggest trying it out on all the VMs, to see if your RAM is sufficient to run them all.

You can find more tweaks in this article.

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  • Annoyingly I didn't get the GUI method of your suggestion, but I edited the .vmx config. I left this for several days without any incident. As part of another configuration I reduced Ubuntu Server to 256MB. All is running smoothly now. Thanks for your help. – Matthew Williams Feb 14 '14 at 8:33

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