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I have a number of wide, 68-pin SCSI drives for which I need to copy the data off. I have tried to use a wide-to-narrow SCSI adapter (68-pin to 50-pin) coupled with an Adaptec SCSI-to-USB adapter (50-pin to USB).

I'm also powering the drive via a Molex power source. The drives do spin up (loudly) but I'm not seeing any recognition from my Ubuntu OS.

Running lsusb I see at least my Adaptec device:

Bus 002 Device 010: ID 03f3:2002 Adaptec, Inc. USB2-Xchange

And dmesg also seems to log this device:

[62101.160439] usb 2-1.4: new high-speed USB device number 10 using ehci-pci
[62101.252777] usb 2-1.4: New USB device found, idVendor=03f3, idProduct=2002
[62101.252787] usb 2-1.4: New USB device strings: Mfr=0, Product=0, SerialNumber=0

Is there anything I can adjust or do to try and get these drives recognized, either with the equipment I have, or with something else?

  • Do you see anything in dmesg kernel log? – user1686 Jun 25 '14 at 14:48
  • [62101.160439] usb 2-1.4: new high-speed USB device number 10 using ehci-pci [62101.252777] usb 2-1.4: New USB device found, idVendor=03f3, idProduct=2002 [62101.252787] usb 2-1.4: New USB device strings: Mfr=0, Product=0, SerialNumber=0 – wxs Jun 25 '14 at 15:15
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I am surprised the scsi-to-usb worked at all. I am guessing by the "Mfr=0 ..." info that your driver is not reading it correctly, but I'm not a USB expert. Unless there are other dmesg messages you left out, it doesn't look like your SCSI subsystem is recognizing any hard disc.

I can find used SCSI wide adapters on Ebay for $20, since there's not much demand for them any longer. That might be a solution if you really want the data on those discs.

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The USB2Xchange isn't supported by the standard Ubuntu kernel.

Someone did develop a patch to support the Adaptec USBXchange and USB2Xchange; see http://linux.derkeiler.com/Mailing-Lists/Kernel/2005-09/4102.html and http://dl.exactcode.de/adaptec-usbxchange/

That patch is for quite an old kernel version though, and you'd have to apply it to your kernel version and compile it. That's not something a non-expert would be comfortable with.

As already suggested, probably the cheapest/fastest option would be to acquire a SCSI card for a desktop PC. Modern motherboards tend not to have PCI slots though, and PCI Express SCSI cards are uncommon (but not too expensive used).

If you're only able to connect via USB, you could try to find an older USB 1.1 USB-SCSI cable based on the Shuttle Technology chipset. Those do work in Linux. Some examples: Adaptec USBConnect 2000, Belkin F5U015-TPW, Belkin F5U115-UNV, Castlewood ORB USB Smart Cable, Entrega/PortGear USB-SCSI, Microtech XpressSCSI, Newer Technology uSCSI. (Sadly the asking price for those on eBay is quite high.)

USB 1.1 transfer rate is of course very low, but if it's a one-time transfer that shouldn't be too bad.

  • Can someone please give a step by step patch installation guide for dummies? – Lunar Sea Oct 8 '18 at 6:35

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