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I have an HP Pavilion G6 Laptop that came with 4 GB RAM (Samsung). I recently upgraded it with another 2GB of G.Skill RAM 1333MHz with CL 9-9-9, so the memory was 6 GB in total.

A few days back, the previous RAM that came with the laptop stopped working and I had to remove it because the laptop was not starting without it and was making beep sounds at the beginning. Now my laptop is running on the 2GB G.Skill RAM but I need more.

I have selected a Corsair Vengence 1600MHz 4GB RAM with CL 9-9-9 for upgrade but the already installed RAM is 1333MHz. My questions are the following:

  1. Are these 2 RAMs compatible in a way that I get the best performance out of both of them?
  2. Does it violate any type of warranty by manufacturer that I am using another company's RAM in the next slot?
  3. Is it okay to install RAMs of different frequencies and different brands?
  4. Do they effect each other or the performance in any way?
  5. Which is the effective way of putting them in the slots? Should the bigger RAM be in slot 1 or slot 2?
  6. Can I also select a RAM of different CL but same frequency?
  7. Can I also install GDDR3 RAM in my laptop?
  8. Can I upgrade RAM to more than 8GB, if my laptop does not support it?
  9. Did my pre-installed RAM stopped functioning because of the newly installed GSkill RAM of different frequency or CL?

Current (Installed) RAM - GSkill http://goo.gl/teXRYJ
Upgrading to Corsair - http://goo.gl/OwYKcG
PC Config : i5 2nd Gen | 1 TB HDD | 1GB Radeon 7940 | Came with 4Gb RAM, Currently running on 2GB.
Please note that I will install both these RAMs in my laptop.

  • Always check in the BIOS which RAM-speed the Bios has actually detected. If that doesn't match the slowest module, swap the SO-DIMMS around until it does. Some motherboards are really stupid about this and try to run the slower RAM at the speed of the faster RAM. That could explain your issue with the original 4G SO-DIMM. – Tonny Jan 5 '17 at 12:47
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Are these 2 RAMs compatible in a way that I get the best performance out of both of them?

Yes they are compatible, no they won’t both run at their best. They lowest-performing module sets the pace.

Does it violate any type of warranty by manufacturer that I am using another company's RAM in the next slot?

Who knows. They don’t need to know, do they? ;)

Is it okay to install RAMs of different frequencies and different brands?

Yes.

Do they effect each other or the performance in any way?

Yes, see 1.

Which is the effective way of putting them in the slots? Should the bigger RAM be in slot 1 or slot 2?

Doesn’t matter.

Can I also select a RAM of different CL but same frequency?

Yes, see 1.

Can I also install GDDR3 RAM in my laptop?

Where would you even buy that? No.

Can I upgrade RAM to more than 8GB, if my laptop does not support it?

Maybe. You’ll have to try.

Did my pre-installed RAM stopped functioning because of the newly installed GSkill RAM of different frequency or CL?

No.

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Just to expand on @DanielB's answer:

  1. Are these 2 RAMs compatible in a way that I get the best performance out of both of them?
  2. Is it okay to install RAMs of different frequencies and different brands?
  3. Do they affect each other or the performance in any way?
  4. Can I also select a RAM of different CL but same frequency?

Brands don't matter, choose the one that fits you best. Frequencies and timings do matter, though.

Each DDR3 frequency has a set of timings that can be used with it, you can find them listed on Wikipedia. All memory modules have to work at the same frequency and with the same timings. You can install modules with different frequencies or timings, but faster ones will be underclocked to match slowest one.

For example let's assume you do have one 1333 MHz 9-9-9 module and one 1600 MHz 9-9-9 module.

  • 1333 MHz module will work with its native frequency
  • 1600 MHz module will be underclocked to 1333 MHz and its performance will drop appropriately
  • Both modules have 9-9-9 timings, so nothing will change here

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