1

I have just downgraded from Debian to Debian Jessie. Before the switch, my Logitech G930 headset would connect correctly as both an input device and output device (although the output device only has stereo while the headset supports 7.1). After the downgrade, it no longer registers as an input device, so I can't use the microphone. I'd like to identify what package is responsible for making the headset work and install it from the testing sources, hence my question. My first thought was pulseaudio, but according to apt-cache policy, jessie, testing and unstable all have the same version (as far as I understand the output):

$ apt-cache policy pulseaudio
pulseaudio:
  Installed: 5.0-6
  Candidate: 5.0-6
  Version table:
 *** 5.0-6 0
        990 http://ftp.no.debian.org/debian/ jessie/main amd64 Packages
        990 http://ftp.no.debian.org/debian/ testing/main amd64 Packages
        500 http://ftp.no.debian.org/debian/ unstable/main amd64 Packages
        100 /var/lib/dpkg/status

So to summarize, my question is: How do I figure out which driver is making my headset work, and how do I figure out which package that driver is a part of?

  • use the comands lsusb and usb-devices to list the connected devices. The usb-devices will tell you which driver has claimed the device in question (this most not always be the right one) Then try to find out to which package the driver belongs. Booting with a ubuntu live medium often helps to find out the proper driver, since ubuntu has a very good hw auto detection. – paradoxon Aug 19 '14 at 20:32
  • @paradoxon: It seems to be handled by snd-usb-audio, which is a part of the package linux-image-3.14-2-amd64, according to dpkg -S snd-usb-audio. Does that mean the driver is built in to the kernel? – Hubro Aug 19 '14 at 21:45
  • It is most likely compiled as module, as most things are. They are loaded when needed (auto-detect on boot or hot-plug event etc.) This ensures that the kernel stays as slim as possible at runtime, while supporting a lot of hw. You could update the kernel, but thats easier said then done on a Debian. Is there a specific reason to back grade to stable? Debian "testing" is still quite stable compared to other distros. – paradoxon Aug 19 '14 at 23:05
  • Other things: Is the mic not "allowed" as source or is not detected at all? What sw do you use to set pulseaudio settings? What are your setting? Try to flip around some different combinations. Just had the problem that pulse would not allow me to use 5.1 analog speakers and mic on the same PCI-card. It was either stero+mic or only 5.1 sound. My on-board card does 5.1+mic without trouble. Include as much info as possible into your post (also what you found about the driver) When we worked it out we I can write a complete answer and tick it as solved, so other users can draw from it. – paradoxon Aug 19 '14 at 23:12
  • 1
    @paradoxon: Unfortunately (or fortunately?) the microphone now shows up under input devices after a computer reboot and headset re-plug and restart, rendering my problem disappear. Your first comment does actually fully answer my question though, so post it and I'll mark it correct. – Hubro Aug 20 '14 at 1:20
0

use the comands lsusb and usb-devices to list the connected devices. The lsusb command will help you find out details about your connected devices. The usb-devices will tell you which driver has claimed the device in question (this most not always be the right one) Booting with a ubuntu live medium often helps to find out the proper driver, since ubuntu has a very good hw auto detection

As you said, try to find out to which package the driver belongs with dpkg -S [driver].

Happy to help

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.