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I have a system that will partially start. It gets up to about 1GB of memory, then completely freezes. It detects all the memory I put in, whether it is 8 or 16GB. I have used completely different sticks, could this be a motherboard issue? I have tried using several different OS'es to make sure this is not the issue. The system posts and will start Windows and Linux, but freezes at what I would expect to be about the 1GB mark. Thanks in advance

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  • I believe this is the most appropriate of all the sites to ask on, but if not I apologize. – johnnic431 Nov 26 '14 at 0:25
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    try safe mode. try event viewer. try memtest86+ superuser.com/questions/189981/… – barlop Nov 26 '14 at 0:36
  • We need more information. If the system is not even completing POST, it means you have a hardware problem, not a software problem. – Ramhound Nov 26 '14 at 0:37
  • you need to explsin what you mean by ". It gets up to about 1GB of memory, then completely freezes" Do you mean you check in 'task manager' within the OS. You say you tried different OSs and if you are making even a grain of sense then you mean you are getting past POST. Are you? – barlop Nov 26 '14 at 0:42
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    "and will start Windows or Linux until what I expect to be about the 1GB mark." You didn't say this in the question, you should, claim the question and edit it. But it also does not make sense. – Ramhound Nov 26 '14 at 0:58
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Considering all the information gathered from the numerous comments. The ideal solution is that your data paths along your mother board arent working like they are supposed to. These data paths I speak allow hardware to "talk" to one another. So if you see those gold lines on your mother board, you'll notice they go from one end to another. Since you stated that since this occurs with your CD Rom as well, RAM would not be a factor if what you stated is that you changed the ram around and your BIOS is i fact detecting the amount of RAM you install.

Look on your MoBo and find the gold lines and trace them all! If you notice bits missing, then take it to a repair store and get it fixed.

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  • "gold lines" -- They are copper metal called "traces". – sawdust Nov 26 '14 at 1:34
  • what kind of repair store fixes motherboards? are you in india? – barlop Nov 26 '14 at 6:47
  • It depends on the store @barlop – Virusboy Nov 26 '14 at 6:56
  • @Virusboy can you give an example of one you're familiar with? – barlop Nov 26 '14 at 7:12
  • You write "Since you stated that since this occurs with your CD Rom as well, RAM would not be a factor if what you stated is that you changed the ram around and your BIOS is i fact detecting the amount of RAM you install." <-- Why does CDROM matter? Whether he loads an OS via CD or HDD RAM is going to be used. The thing that I suppose suggests it's not RAM is him saying in his q that he used completely different sticks - well spotted there. But whether OS or OS installation starts from CD has not much to do with showing whether RAM is at fault. It just shows it's not the hard drive – barlop Nov 26 '14 at 7:15
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I have seen this issue before. Some motherboard makes that have UEFI built in become ruined when you install linux of any bread onto it. Linux has a habbit of making full use of any resources that are available to it. Some UEFI chips tend to freak out when more than 50% of its resources are used up. It's not your ram that's messing things up, it's your UEFI's incompatibility with linux. Unfortunetly, this issue isn't recognized by POST. The only thing you can do now is, hope your warranty is still valid and call them and wrench on them for a new one because they didn't let you add what ever you want on it. It's extremely important to google OS compatibility to any motherboard with UEFI on it as this will cause issues. ALWAYS GOOGLE WHAT YOU'RE DOING EVEN IF YOU KNOW WHAT YOU'RE DOING

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  • I don't think this is the issue because I had Linux and Windows installed together for a while, but I had installed Windows updates and was restating the last time it worked. And Windows gets 10 seconds into it's loading screen, and Linux does competely start, but then the system freezes. – Nick Johnson Nov 26 '14 at 0:50
  • I think using all memory is not bad habbit. It is just "diffrent approach" to memory management. – Kamil Nov 26 '14 at 0:51
  • The system freezes after Linux os completely loaded and after Windows has started loading. – Nick Johnson Nov 26 '14 at 0:53
  • Describe how it freezes. Does it demonstrate any graphical ticks. How does it handle liveCD's? – Miphix Nov 26 '14 at 0:55
  • The system good through the bios, then asks Windows or ubuntu. I chose Windows, and Windows begins loading. After about ten seconds, the hard drive stops. If I loaded from the install CD, the same process happens. – Nick Johnson Nov 26 '14 at 1:01

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