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User group in windows groups users so it is then easier to grant permissions to all users of a group at once. This works like: we have a group "A_GROUP1" which contains users "USR1,USR2,USR3" then we select a folder "c:\temp" and goto 'Properties' of that folder and then select 'Security' tab and assign rights so after that each user of group "A_GROUP1" has this rights on "c:\temp" folder.


But is it in windows possible to grant rights to some group lets say "A_GROUP2" without specifying any target directory? E.g. specify that users of group "A_GROUP2" will have read and write access without explicitly specifying the folder. If it is possible how to do it?


It should be somehow possible, baceuse I read the following about IIS_IUSRS Group:

This built-in group has access to all the necessary file and system resources so that an account, when added to this group, can seamlessly act as an application pool identity.

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Simply put, no. Permission flags, for example read and write need TO be attributed to a folder or file. You can't assign read/write permissions to nothing.

If you're talking about giving a group global permissions over all data on the file server then you would need to run a script to grant those permissions recursively through the file system.

All I can think off is whether or not you could choose the default permission groups for newly created folders or files, from my research this is achievable quite easily on Linux but not Windows it seems, there may be some sort of 3rd party application that could accomplish this but I do not know of one.

This built-in group has access to all the necessary file and system resources so that an account, when added to this group, can seamlessly act as an application pool identity

... Still at some point needed to be granted the permissions to the relevant IIS folders, this would of happened when you added the IIS server role and installed IIS.

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