Background

Recently, I copy-n-pasted some text from Notepad into a command line window. The copied text included a TAB character prefixing the text I copied, for example "{tab}test.exe". When I pasted this into my command line window, the result was:

@OpenWithToastLogo.pngtest.exe

Wait, what?

A quick search on the computer in question as well as a subsequent one on Google revealed the following:

  • On the computer in question, there is in fact a file named @OpenWithToastLogo.png located in the Windows System32 folder.
  • On Google, my scan of the search results seemed to show only non-specific answers (as of the writing of this question, that is) with the standard bevy of "is this malware" sites indicating that a virus scan showed the file not to be a virus.

Question

  1. Does anyone in the Super User community know what the purpose of the @OpenWithToastLogo.png file is?

  2. Also, why is "@OpenWithToastLogo.png" (text) associated with a pasted TAB character in a command line window? Answer: The pasted TAB character is being interpreted in the command windows as auto-complete, which in this case returns the first file in the current folder (C:\Windows\System32) of the command window. (Thank you Daniel B for your comment!)

  • 2
    Is it really .png? Tab trigger autocompletion. – Daniel B Jan 9 '15 at 19:31
  • 1
    @DanielB: Ah, yes, auto-complete. That definitively answers Question #2 (above). The TAB character is being interpreted as auto-complete, which in this case returns the first file in the current folder of the command window. – László Koller Jan 9 '15 at 19:47
  • Can you open the file in an image viewer? I'm curious what its contents are. "Toast" I know is used to describe the pop-up messages that appear over the UI in Android (usually when a task is complete), it's probably something similar for Windows 8. – baochan Jan 9 '15 at 20:20
  • Toast is a video capture program. Do you have any Roxio products installed? If you really want to know where it came from, run Orca against c:\windows\installer to list all files associated with each installer. – user388043 Jan 10 '15 at 5:02

Your Answer

 

By clicking "Post Your Answer", you acknowledge that you have read our updated terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy, and that your continued use of the website is subject to these policies.

Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.