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I have a fairly simple question: I had mapped a work account to Outlook that I no longer have. However, every time I start up Outlook, it asks me for the password to that account. I just want the old emails to sit there, and not refresh or try to sync with the mail server. How can I make this happen?

Update 1:

@CharlieRB's suggestion leads to this: enter image description here

I will of course backup my account now, but wanted to understand what exactly "cached content" means?

Update 2:

So it turns out that my Exchange Server account has an .ost file that cannot be moved easily. Any advice on how to either:

  • stop Outlook 2013 from asking for a password every time I open up Outlook; or,
  • how to move the offline files associated with the account so that the files do not get deleted when I remove the account,

would be appreciated.

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    In any case i would back up the ost file before trying to delete the profile / account. – Ivan Viktorovic Jan 26 '15 at 14:51
  • Is this old account an exchange account? Or is it IMAP/ POP3? – Ivan Viktorovic Jan 26 '15 at 14:53
  • Cache used by exchange accounts is kinda a local copy of you exchange e-mail account. When you are offline you can access the cached(offline) e-mails and setting. If you would remove all cache on an exchange account it would mean to remove all local data and you only would have access to you mailbox when you are connected to the mail server via lan or wan. – Ivan Viktorovic Jan 26 '15 at 15:02
  • @IvanViktorovic It is an exchange account, and in my case, this applies. – tchakravarty Jan 26 '15 at 15:02
  • @IvanViktorovic Yeah, so it turns out that removing the account is not an option without going through some pretty horrific maneuvering mentioned in the page linked in the comment above. – tchakravarty Jan 26 '15 at 15:03
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One possible solution is to create a new archive pst and move all mails there and then remove the old e-mail account.

Update 1:

Cache used by exchange accounts is kinda a local copy of you exchange e-mail account. When you are offline you can access the cached(offline) e-mails and setting. If you would remove all cache on an exchange account it would mean to remove all local data and you only would have access to you mailbox when you are connected to the mail server via lan or wan.

Update 2:

This is how you could create a new PST file (https://support.office.com/en-us/article/Create-an-Outlook-Data-File-pst-to-save-your-information-17a13ca2-df52-48e8-b933-4c84c2aabe7c)

Now after you created the file you need to move the old mails to this file. Try disconnection from the internet before opening outlook and then you should not get the passwort question, move all mail to the pst and then remove the account. Then you connect to you network again.

To move you mails into the PST file you could use autoarchive mechanics (https://support.office.com/en-us/article/AutoArchive-settings-explained-444bd6aa-06d0-4d8f-9d84-903163439114) or simply move any folder or mail with the mouse to move it into the archive or rightclick mails/folders when marked and then use "move to" and select the archive. Be aware that pst file have some limits (50GB) but i usually would not use archives bigger than 10GB because they are getting slow fast when you search them. When reaching the limit you could just create a new archive.

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Go to File > Account Settings > Email tab and remove the account in question. These are the connection settings which Outlook is trying to make contact with and asks for the password.

enter image description here

The data will stay in the inbox or folder you currently have it in, but Outlook will stop trying to connect to that account.

Source (at the bottom of the page)

  • I have updated the question per your suggestion -- can you clarify what exactly "cached content" means? – tchakravarty Jan 26 '15 at 14:48
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I had the same problem and just wanted to keep the account around to look at old emails occasionally, but didn't want to export/import them anywhere. I found this procedure online and it got rid of the annoying attempts to Send/Receive without deleting the account:

When you want to stop using an email account with Microsoft Outlook, you can disable the account so that you no longer receive emails. All of your saved messages will remain intact, and you can change your mind at any time. However, until you completely delete the account, you will still be able to send messages from the account.

Launch Outlook and click the "Send/Receive" tab.

Click "Send/Receive Groups" on the ribbon, and then select "Define Send/Receive Groups."

Select the "All Accounts" send/receive group in the new window, and then click the "Edit" button.

Select the account you want to disable, and then clear the check box next to "Include the Selected Account in This Group." Click "OK" to save the change.

Repeat the previous steps for any other send/receive groups displayed in the list. Click "Close" once you have removed the account from all the groups. Outlook will no longer receive mail from the account; however, you can still send messages from the account at this point.

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