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I do install VirtualBox on Windows 7, and create a virtual machine, which install centOS 7. Then in centOS7 perform the installation of CollabNet Subversion Edge, following this information as a guide (http://binpipe.blogspot.com.ar/2012/04/installing-collabnet-svn-on-centos.html) perform all the steps provided there but I can not access the server. On my centos I can access it via localhost:3343/csvn/. The installation should be performed on a desktop machine and the server I'm trying to access from a notebook, which is connected to the same network as the desktop machine. Also obviously, as the network has a proxy to surf, I had to configure it, and doing well because I can surf the internet and others.Its using 'Bridged Adapter' networking in the VM settings. Can you think of any idea why I do not have access? Any help is welcome.

I found here a response, similar to what I'm looking for, but do not quite understand what it says.(https://stackoverflow.com/questions/27003677/accessing-a-centos-7-minimal-server-running-on-virtualbox-from-outside). I'm only in centOS7 enp0s3 interface, and there is collabnet running, not running on another interface.

NEWS: Gain access the server using its IP (172.x.x.x:3343/svn or 172.x.x.x:18080/svn), but not by name. Maybe there is a problem in the computer name, applies only to Windows, and CentOS running on the virtual machine, use another computer name. Can it be? If so, you know how to identify such equipment?

Thank you very much!

  • Is the firewall running on the CentOS 7 node? If so, it will probably block 3343 by default. – shearn89 Feb 2 '15 at 13:39
  • @shearn89 Yes it is. Similarly, the server is accessed via port 18080 as the repository URL is: NAME: 18080 / svn /. I must unlock the port 18080 or 3343? How to unlock? Thank You! – Fabrizio Gelsi Feb 2 '15 at 13:44
  • I've posted the response as an answer, see below. – shearn89 Feb 2 '15 at 13:49
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The firewall is blocking the ports on the virtual machine. You can temporarily add an exception to the firewall on the box with:

iptables -A INPUT -p tcp --dport 3343 -j ACCEPT
iptables -A INPUT -p tcp --dport 18080 -j ACCEPT

You may need to be root or run these with sudo.

To add these permanently, then do:

service iptables save

And they should persist through reboots.

  • I just did, and I still can not access. I'll also unlock my windows 7 host ?. I feel frustrated :( – Fabrizio Gelsi Feb 2 '15 at 13:57
  • Try turning the firewall off completely to debug the problem: service iptables stop. – shearn89 Feb 2 '15 at 13:58
  • The problem persist. I don't know the cause. (stackoverflow.com/questions/27003677/…) this will not seem like a solution? I do not understand that information used ... but perhaps come from that side. – Fabrizio Gelsi Feb 2 '15 at 14:11
  • If the virtual machine is using a bridged adapter then it should get an ip address in the same subnet as the host machine, and should effectively be treated the same as a laptop or desktop on the same network. – shearn89 Feb 2 '15 at 14:16
  • Gain access the server using its IP (172.x.x.x:3343/svn or 172.x.x.x:18080/svn), but not by name. Maybe there is a problem in the computer name, applies only to Windows, and CentOS running on the virtual machine, use another computer name. Can it be? If so, you know how to identify such equipment? :D @shearn89 – Fabrizio Gelsi Feb 2 '15 at 15:10

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