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Sometimes when I create a folder with a program (in this case, CodeLite) the program that I created with it can access it and read the files in it just fine, but everything else such as file explorer, command prompt, other programs, etc, are all blissfully unaware of its existence. I cannot explain how strange this is, I don't think this is a problem of permissions, but I am at a loss.

And the paths are exactly the same...

Windows 7 Pro, 64bit.

Here is a screenshot to illustrate. On the left, the program that created the folder/files accessing them and File Explorer as well as Command Prompt on the right showing that it doesn't even exist. The files are not just in memory or something weird like that, because this is all after creating them and rebooting.

Edit: Apparently I can't post images because I currently lack the reputation on this website. But I assure you, it is exactly as I have described.

Update: I am still clueless as to what is causing this, but an Administrator command prompt doesn't see the folder, either.

Update: I tried to drag the folder from the "open dialog" onto my desktop and I got a dialog just saying "Could not find this item"

Update: If I drag the folder from the "open dialog" into the desktop folder via the left-hand pane inside the dialog itself, then voila, I can see the folder everywhere. But then if I move it back in the same way, it disappears again.

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  • You can give link in comment and someone will edit your question.
    – Davidenko
    Commented Feb 4, 2015 at 7:52

1 Answer 1

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It occured to me that the program CodeLite might not even have write access to the Program Files folder (whether or not that's true) and decided, well... maybe Windows has some form of "union directories" and stores it elsewhere? But where?

AppData!

So, turns out, that's exactly where it was, but for the program that put it there it appears to be in another directory entirely.

The folder was found within this directory:

C:\Users\User\AppData\Local\VirtualStore

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