20

I have time values in two cells in an Excel sheet and I need the difference of the times in minutes.

The cells in the Excel are like below:

   A        B        C
1  6:38     8:23     1:45:00

A is the start time
B is the end time
C is the time difference (B1-A1) which is displayed in hh:mm:ss format

A and B cols are formatted as custom hh:mm and cell C is formatted as custom hh:mm:ss.

But I need to get in the value in cell C1 as 105 instead of 1:45:00.

Could you please help in displaying time only in minutes and giving the right format?

  • In case you still care after almost 6 years: I added some examples to Neal's answer, which does not need any formulas. – Arjan Aug 25 '15 at 13:44
20

Just set the cell to be shown in numerical format and it will show a decimal number.

The integer part corresponds to the date value (i.e. the day) and the decimal part to the time of the day.

If you multiply the numerical value of 1:45 (which is 0,07) by 24x60 (the number of hours in a day and the number of minutes in an hour) you will obtain the value in minutes of your cell (105).

| improve this answer | |
  • 1
    Instead of additional calculations, I'd prefer to use formatting, like in Neal's answer. – Arjan Aug 21 '15 at 13:09
14

Just format your cell as [mm].

The square brackets around the mm tell Excel to show the total rather than what would be shown if you took the total hours off. The brackets also force Excel to interpret mm as minutes, not as the month. (Without the brackets, m and mm refer to the month if not preceded by h or hh for hours or followed by ss for seconds.)

So, where 1:45:00 with format mm:ss would ignore the hours and show 45:00, both [m]:ss and [mm]:ss will show as 105:00, and both [m] and [mm] would show 105 (where m and mm would show 12, being the month of Excel's default date, which is December 31, 1899).

This also works for hours and seconds. Like 27:10:59 with h:mm would show 3:10, but both [h]:mm and [hh]:mm show 27:10, while both [h] and [hh] show 27. And s would show 59, but [s] gives 97859.

| improve this answer | |
  • So lets suppose I've a cell that has both date & 24hr-time like 2018-09-25 15:40:33 ...refer to prntscr.com/ip2b1t Using your suggestion in column C I split date from time & convert it to TOTAL secs. In column A I want to have a cumulative rising duration (in secs) & I have achieved it as shown in figure by assigning 0 to A1 then assigning =A1+(C2-C1) to A2. Is there any other alternative to skip intermediate calculation in column C – nightcrawler Mar 9 '18 at 21:01
11

I think this will work:

  • A1 6:23
  • B1 8:23
  • C1 =(B1-A1)*24*60

Just make sure you format C1 as "General"

| improve this answer | |
0

Just format your C cell as hh:mm.

| improve this answer | |
  • 1
    Or, to show 28 hours as 28, not 04, surround with square brackets: [hh]:mm. – Arjan Aug 21 '15 at 13:05
0

As some people have already said, If you multiply the numerical value of 1:45 (which is 0,07) by 24x60=1440 (the number of hours in a day and the number of minutes in an hour) you will obtain the value in minutes of your cell (105). Short version: C1 =(B1-A1)*1440

| improve this answer | |

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.