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I have one ISP and I want to create two different networks in two different floors. I have 2 wireless routers and the ISP modem which has an integrated router with 4 ethernet ports.

I want the two routers to use the same internet connection but they must be two separated networks (devices on network1 should not be seen on network2 and vice-versa).

Which of the following counfigurations should be better?

Parallel Configuration:

 ______________       ______________
|              |     |              |
|  ISP Modem   |-----|   Router 1   |
|______________|     |______________|
       |              ______________
       |             |              |
       |-------------|   Router 2   |
                     |______________|

Cascade Configuration:

 ______________       ______________
|              |     |              |
|  ISP Modem   |-----|   Router 1   |
|______________|     |______________|
                      _______|______
                     |              |
                     |   Router 2   |
                     |______________|

How should I setup the routers settings to do this? (IPs, Subnets, etc.)

2

Parallel is the way to go. With cascade, device in the network connected to Router 2 can access everything connected to Router 1. Service discovery won’t work because it’s a different broadcast domain, but that’s it. If you know the address(es) or actively scan, everything is accessible.

  • With parallel it should not be possible to access devices on the other network then? Will I have to look to some settings in particular? – dan_s Apr 18 '15 at 16:15
  • 1
    Provided both routers are using SNAT or appropriate firewall settings, yes. All consumer-grade routers are configured that way by default, to protect computers on the local network from whatever is crawling around the Internet. – Daniel B Apr 18 '15 at 19:19

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