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I have an ASUS laptop which I am trying to re-purpose as a Linux machine, to which I purchased a new 750GB hard drive. Yesterday I installed Ubuntu 14.04 LTS and followed general guidelines for creating different drive partitions, actually allowing for slightly more space than suggested since the hard drive is pretty large.

I also encrypted my home directory during install (not sure if this is what is causing the problem I'm about to describe).

Tonight I'm trying to get a few programs setup on here that I use regularly such as Spotify and Dropbox. I was able to install both of these, however Dropbox seems to think I am out of diskspace (claims I only have 500MB left or some nonsense). I am confused as to why. It is located in my /home/mydirectory which I (believe) is setup with the largest partition, close to 700GB. Even if I wanted to sync everything I have in my DB, that is still only 30GB, so clearly I have plenty of space.

When I "examined disks" to see where the problem was, I noticed that a seemingly large portion of that disk is being used (reserved?) by my private (encrypted) directory. Is it possible to move DB to this directory? How do I place things in there in the first place?

I encrypted it for safety/security reasons originally, but now I am questioning if it was worth it. I wasn't given any options from DB when I installed it, but I know I can "move" the directory. Any help or suggestions are appreciated.

Edit 05-16-15

At your suggestion, I found out the following information:

user@Asus:~$ df -H
Filesystem               Size  Used Avail Use% Mounted on
/dev/sda9                 17G   15G  658M  96% /
none                     4.1k     0  4.1k   0% /sys/fs/cgroup
udev                     4.1G  4.1k  4.1G   1% /dev
tmpfs                    814M  1.3M  813M   1% /run
none                     5.3M     0  5.3M   0% /run/lock
none                     4.1G  6.6M  4.1G   1% /run/shm
none                     105M   41k  105M   1% /run/user
/home/user/.Private   17G   15G  658M  96% /home/greywolf
user@Asus:~$ 

Looking at this, I see why it thinks I am running out of space. However, this is still perplexing to me as I have a 700+GB volume that is not listed here at all. What is more odd is that prior to opening this message to edit, I saw it mounted (even pulled up the properties) - now it is gone. When I was trying to install on here, I thought I had saved the largest volume for /home. I have not gotten very far in this process that I couldn't just start over. If you had a 750GB hard drive to install Ubuntu on, what partitions would you create during the start up process and in what capacities? That may be what I need to try again. (I didn't have this problem the last time so not sure why I'm having it now)

gparted gave me the following:

user@Asus:~$ sudo gparted
======================
libparted : 2.3
======================

(gpartedbin:4874): GLib-CRITICAL **: Source ID 7 was not found when attempting to remove it

(gpartedbin:4874): GLib-CRITICAL **: Source ID 6 was not found when attempting to remove it

(gpartedbin:4874): GLib-CRITICAL **: Source ID 26 was not found when attempting to remove it

(gpartedbin:4874): GLib-CRITICAL **: Source ID 25 was not found when attempting to remove it

(gpartedbin:4874): GLib-CRITICAL **: Source ID 33 was not found when attempting to remove it

(gpartedbin:4874): GLib-CRITICAL **: Source ID 32 was not found when attempting to remove it

(gpartedbin:4874): GLib-CRITICAL **: Source ID 36 was not found when attempting to remove it

(gpartedbin:4874): GLib-CRITICAL **: Source ID 35 was not found when attempting to remove it

(gpartedbin:4874): GLib-CRITICAL **: Source ID 39 was not found when attempting to remove it

(gpartedbin:4874): GLib-CRITICAL **: Source ID 38 was not found when attempting to remove it

(gpartedbin:4874): GLib-CRITICAL **: Source ID 42 was not found when attempting to remove it

(gpartedbin:4874): GLib-CRITICAL **: Source ID 41 was not found when attempting to remove it

(gpartedbin:4874): GLib-CRITICAL **: Source ID 45 was not found when attempting to remove it

(gpartedbin:4874): GLib-CRITICAL **: Source ID 44 was not found when attempting to remove it

(gpartedbin:4874): GLib-CRITICAL **: Source ID 48 was not found when attempting to remove it

(gpartedbin:4874): GLib-CRITICAL **: Source ID 47 was not found when attempting to remove it

(gpartedbin:4874): GLib-CRITICAL **: Source ID 51 was not found when attempting to remove it

(gpartedbin:4874): GLib-CRITICAL **: Source ID 50 was not found when attempting to remove it

(gpartedbin:4874): GLib-CRITICAL **: Source ID 54 was not found when attempting to remove it

(gpartedbin:4874): GLib-CRITICAL **: Source ID 53 was not found when attempting to remove it

(gpartedbin:4874): GLib-CRITICAL **: Source ID 57 was not found when attempting to remove it

(gpartedbin:4874): GLib-CRITICAL **: Source ID 56 was not found when attempting to remove it

(gpartedbin:4874): GLib-CRITICAL **: Source ID 60 was not found when attempting to remove it

(gpartedbin:4874): GLib-CRITICAL **: Source ID 59 was not found when attempting to remove it

(gpartedbin:4874): GLib-CRITICAL **: Source ID 65 was not found when attempting to remove it

(gpartedbin:4874): GLib-CRITICAL **: Source ID 64 was not found when attempting to remove it

It appears to still be running. It also brought up the gparted gui, which I took a screen shot of but I am uncertain how to post that in here.

Results from Mount:

user@Asus:~$ mount
/dev/sda9 on / type ext4 (rw,errors=remount-ro)
proc on /proc type proc (rw,noexec,nosuid,nodev)
sysfs on /sys type sysfs (rw,noexec,nosuid,nodev)
none on /sys/fs/cgroup type tmpfs (rw)
none on /sys/fs/fuse/connections type fusectl (rw)
none on /sys/kernel/debug type debugfs (rw)
none on /sys/kernel/security type securityfs (rw)
udev on /dev type devtmpfs (rw,mode=0755)
devpts on /dev/pts type devpts (rw,noexec,nosuid,gid=5,mode=0620)
tmpfs on /run type tmpfs (rw,noexec,nosuid,size=10%,mode=0755)
none on /run/lock type tmpfs (rw,noexec,nosuid,nodev,size=5242880)
none on /run/shm type tmpfs (rw,nosuid,nodev)
none on /run/user type tmpfs (rw,noexec,nosuid,nodev,size=104857600,mode=0755)
none on /sys/fs/pstore type pstore (rw)
systemd on /sys/fs/cgroup/systemd type cgroup (rw,noexec,nosuid,nodev,none,name=systemd)
/home/user/.Private on /home/user type ecryptfs (ecryptfs_check_dev_ruid,ecryptfs_cipher=aes,ecryptfs_key_bytes=16,ecryptfs_unlink_sigs,ecryptfs_sig=9c8812d31a548113,ecryptfs_fnek_sig=7e7a38601164a67f)
gvfsd-fuse on /run/user/1000/gvfs type fuse.gvfsd-fuse (rw,nosuid,nodev,user=user)
/dev/sda5 on /media/user/2a556b61-ee1f-4f45-a618-a811d40e6f48 type ext4 (rw,nosuid,nodev,uhelper=udisks2)
/dev/sda8 on /media/user/17eec742-26fd-40ff-a1d8-2730c7aea46e type ext4 (rw,nosuid,nodev,uhelper=udisks2)
/dev/sda7 on /media/user/b8c70277-bf06-410f-91ac-ce5d54ed208c type ext4 (rw,nosuid,nodev,uhelper=udisks2)
user@Asus:~$ 

I am 99% certain that sda8 is the large partition.

Here is the content of the fstab file:

# /etc/fstab: static file system information.
#
# Use 'blkid' to print the universally unique identifier for a
# device; this may be used with UUID= as a more robust way to name devices
# that works even if disks are added and removed. See fstab(5).
#
#                
# / was on /dev/sda9 during installation
UUID=b187f237-9f0d-4644-b6eb-880a2c131f7e /               ext4    errors=remount-ro 0       1
# swap was on /dev/sda10 during installation
#UUID=b7b9eb33-8e0a-4f48-9196-e582abe50b10 none            swap    sw              0       0
/dev/mapper/cryptswap1 none swap sw 0 0

After following some of the suggestions (below) df -h now shows this:

Filesystem               Size  Used Avail Use% Mounted on
/dev/sda9                 16G   15G  336M  98% /
none                     4.0K     0  4.0K   0% /sys/fs/cgroup
udev                     3.8G   12K  3.8G   1% /dev
tmpfs                    777M  1.2M  776M   1% /run
none                     5.0M     0  5.0M   0% /run/lock
none                     3.8G  3.8M  3.8G   1% /run/shm
none                     100M   48K  100M   1% /run/user
/home/user/.Private   16G   15G  336M  98% /home/user
/dev/sda5                687M   44M  594M   7% /media/user/2a556b61-ee1f-4f45-a618-a811d40e6f48
/dev/sda8                650G   70M  617G   1% /media/user/17eec742-26fd-40ff-a1d8-2730c7aea46e
/dev/sda7                6.8G   16M  6.4G   1% /media/user/b8c70277-bf06-410f-91ac-ce5d54ed208c

As you can see, /sda8 is the large partition. I honestly thought I had made that the /home partition but clearly it isn't, which is causing all kinds of issues.

  • open up terminal and run df -H and edit your question with the output. that will give us a bit of an idea of what we're dealing with here – Russell Uhl May 15 '15 at 12:45
  • Run gparted to see your partition sizes. – davidbaumann May 16 '15 at 14:59
  • Post the results of 'mount', and the content of your fstab file – davidbaumann May 16 '15 at 15:01
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Edit: resize2fs didn't work. Try "resize2fs /dev/sda9" in a terminal.

Or you can install and use gparted to edit your partitions.

I think This Post is what you are looking for. Gparted is going to be the best tool to use. The Gparted manual should get you started feeling comfortable using it.

  • Tried this, it gave me the following: <pre> resize2fs 1.42.9 (4-Feb-2014) Filesystem at /dev/sda9 is mounted on /; on-line resizing required old_desc_blocks = 1, new_desc_blocks = 1 The filesystem on /dev/sda9 is now 4063488 blocks long. </pre> – Grey Wolf May 16 '15 at 15:18
  • OK how's df -h look now? – Dean Spicer May 16 '15 at 15:22
  • Dean - I put it in my main message. – Grey Wolf May 16 '15 at 15:35

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