0

I have a laptop running WIndows 8.1 and Windows 10 Dual boot (I Installed Windows 10 last). Both are encrypted with BitLocker.

I want to remove the Windows 8.1 OS, Partition , and remove it from the boot menu.

Is this possible?

3 Answers 3

2

Removing Windows 8.1 from Boot

From Windows 10, start MSCONFIG utitlity. (Use Run box (Win+R))

Go to Boot tag, and remove any unnecessary boot entry from there. If there is only a single entry, while Booting, Windows won't bother showing 30-seconds display to choose boot device.

Removing Partition

Use Disk Management, Right Click on Computer>Manage>Disk Management, Right Click on Windows 8.1 partition and use Delete Volume option.

0
1

To remove the ability to choose which OS to boot. Do this in your main OS you want. Now I haven't played with Win10 yet. But in Win 7 & 8 in control panel -> System. Click on Settings button

System Properties

In "Startup and Recovery" uncheck "Time to display list of OS". Ensure you choose from the drop down list the OS you want to load by default.

Startup and Recovery

If you use a Partition Manager to reclaim the other partition ensure you backup your HD at the partition level in the event you remove the ability to boot to the OS of your choice and need to recover.

1
  • This just changes the default selection. He wants to remove the second instance all together including the partition. Please document how to DO THAT.
    – Ramhound
    Aug 21, 2015 at 19:49
-2

Proceed with caution!! Use GParted and you should be able to delete a partition you don't want, re-size, etc. and fully supports NTFS. Be sure you have a good backup first. There are other packages that do this, but GParted will require you to use a boot CD to do this. You will not be able to re-size an in-use partition.

You can edit the menu from Computer Properties to change what partition boots first..

5
  • Thanks. Because both OS's (When loaded) assume they're the C:, even though they're on different partitions, will deleting one cause any issues? Aug 21, 2015 at 7:24
  • Why am I being downvoited?? No. They are not both C: if they are different partitions.You do need to make sure you set the flag of the Primary partition - if not previously set. Windows will want to run a CHKDSK if you change the geometry of the drive (if you re-size the Windows 10 Partition to be the primary OS of the drive).
    – Leptonator
    Aug 21, 2015 at 12:33
  • You are being downvoted because you are suggesting a non-Windows solution to a problem that can be easily solved using Windows and it's built in tools/commands. It is also technically incorrect because you can resize an in-use partition.
    – qasdfdsaq
    Aug 21, 2015 at 16:10
  • @qasdfdsaq - I am sorry, but I have to disagree with you. Maybe I run a bit paranoid when working with computers and is why I recommend using a tool like Gparted as I have been burned by processes like this being in use. I would rather disconnect the drive, delete, re-size, etc. A bit "old-school?" Yes, but I would be a lot more cautious that doing this live. Yes, I know VMWare and tools like that can add/delete/shrink space while being up and running.
    – Leptonator
    Aug 22, 2015 at 4:38
  • @Leptonator: You're welcome to disagree, but I have to counter your argument with the exact opposite. G-Parted and the other tools have reverse-engineered and buggy implementations of NTFS. Windows' built-in tools are the only official tools that support all the functionality and are guaranteed not to break anything.
    – qasdfdsaq
    Aug 24, 2015 at 12:29

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.