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I've been running a custom staticDHCPd (Python) DHCP server for a couple of years, and in the configuration file I've always added the hostname along with the other data, here's an example

; ---------------------------------------------------
; Raspberry Pi - NTP - 1 - 05.2012 (wired)
[xx:xx:xx:xx:xx:xx]
hostname: rpi-ntp
ip:       192.168.11.4
subnet:   192.168.11.0/24
serial:   1

; ---------------------------------------------------
; Raspberry Pi - Sensor - 3 - 03.2014 (wireless)
[xx:xx:xx:xx:xx:xx]
hostname: rpi-sen-t
ip:       192.168.11.26
subnet:   192.168.11.0/24
serial:   1

I'm now migrating this server to another non-custom system, and from what I've seen the console/WebGUI doesn't allow me to specify host names. It only prints/presents them as read-only data.

Regarding my data, the host names in the configuration files match the host name in the configuration files where possible (linuxes, windows), as a particle photon or an arduino doesn't have a hostname, AFAIK. It's also those tiny devices and some odd hardware like Tolino ebook readers which have problems with my custom DHCP server, there must be something in the DHCP OFFER which prevents them from accepting the data (haven't Wiresharked it).

Now, the core of the question: does it make any sense to try to use "rfc2132 - 3.14. Host Name Option (BOOTP / DHCP option 12, Host Name)" to send a host name to a device? I usually configure the DHCP server via a script, which also updates the DNS server, so actually it appears to be irrelevant which hostname a device has. On a Blog I've read that "With BOOTP / DHCP option 012 a host name can be supplied, but only if the client requests a hostname.". Is it safe to assume that in a standard network with a couple of PC's, Tablets, Smartphones and a dozen of IoT devices it's certainly not neccessary to care about the DHCP server sending the hostname to the clients? Am I worrying about nothing?

Thanks in advance.

EDIT: Checked with Wireshark on a Windows PC, the custom server is effectively not sending the hostname in the DHCP Offer (possibly as it's not getting requested) and from what I've read Ubuntu doesn't request it as well, which also may apply to Debian.

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The hostname is only going to be relevant to DNS... really (there may be some other things that might care, like a program you could run). What I'm saying is, unless you need to address those odd devices you listed by name instead of IP address, it is most likely nothing to worry about.

If you run a program that uses hostname and is not designed to use IP address, you may have a problem. I have no idea why someone would do that, but it may exist somewhere.

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