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In one of the pairs of protocols given below , both the protocols can use multiple TCP connections between the same client and the server. Which one is that?

  1. HTTP, FTP
  2. HTTP, TELNET
  3. FTP, SMTP
  4. HTTP, SMTP

My attempt:

SMTP: only one TCP connection

Telnet: only one TCP connection

HTTP: Multiple connections can be used for each resource

FTP: FTP uses Telnet protocol for Control info on a TCP connection and another TCP connection for data exchange

HTTP may use different TCP connection for different objects of a webpage if non-persistent connections are used. FTP uses two TCP connections, one for data and another control.

So , option (1) is true .

Can you explain it in a formal way, please?

  • Yes. It is correct. – jcbermu Oct 22 '15 at 8:15
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First it's not clear what "client" (and "server") means. A machine/hardware or software?


Anyway, any protocol (or at least any of the listed in your question) can use multiple TCP connections between the same client and the server.

Even if "client" means "software":

  • HTTP - obviously, any browser can have the same page/server in multiple tabs

  • FTP - most FTP clients have ability to run a transfer queue with multiple parallel transfers

  • Telnet - tabbed terminal client

  • SMTP - Probably not commonly used, but what prevents an e-mail client from dispatching multiple emails at the same time using separate connections?


Unless it is meant that the multiple connection are used for the same "session".

In what case, your answer (HTTP + FTP) is the correct one, and the question is badly asked.

  • Can you please add in the answer , for both , if a machine is (1)hardware , and (2)software in brief description . Thanks for the help. – ً ً Oct 22 '15 at 8:59
  • Do you want me to elaborate on what the answer would be like if the hardware is meant by the client/server? – Martin Prikryl Oct 22 '15 at 9:10
  • Yes sir , I want to know for both situations – ً ً Oct 22 '15 at 9:15
  • If hardware is meant, you can run as many client applications on a single hardware as you like. So you can have as many connections for each protocol as you like (two email clients sending two different emails in parallel from the same machine to the same server). – Martin Prikryl Oct 22 '15 at 9:26

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