361

After examining header values from Richard's answer, I came up with a solution which is fast, easy, and only requires a text editor. Even Windows' default notepad.exe would work. Open the executable in text editor. You might have to drag-and-drop or use the editor's Open... dialog, because Windows doesn't show Open with... option in context menu for ...


124

The SDK tool dumpbin.exe with the /headers option includes this information, compare these two (I've added bold for the key information) PS [64] E:\ #4> dumpbin /headers C:\Windows\system32\cmd.exe Microsoft (R) COFF/PE Dumper Version 10.00.40219.01 Copyright (C) Microsoft Corporation. All rights reserved. Dump of file C:\Windows\system32\cmd.exe PE ...


50

I am answering my own question after gathering important information from other blog posts. Show what foreign architectures are installed: dpkg --print-foreign-architectures Might show: i386 Remove all i386 packages: apt-get purge ".*:i386" Note: The purge keyword (instead of remove) removes all configuration files associated with the packages you're ...


47

If you don't have or want the whole Windows SDK or Visual Studio, you can use sigcheck.exe from SysInternals: sigcheck.exe C:\Windows\Notepad.exe Output: Sigcheck v2.1 - File version and signature viewer Copyright (C) 2004-2014 Mark Russinovich Sysinternals - www.sysinternals.com c:\windows\notepad.exe: Verified: Signed Signing date: 8:59 ...


41

I can confirm that the file utility (e.g. from cygwin) will distinguish between 32- and 64-bit executables. They appear as follows: 32.exe: PE32 executable (GUI) Intel 80386, for MS Windows 64.exe: PE32+ executable (console) x86-64, for MS Windows As you can see, it's very obvious which is which. Additionally it distinguishes between console and GUI ...


32

A simple method is to run it (assuming you trust it) and take a look at the process tab in task manager. 32bit processes will show "* 32" at the end of the process name. If it's not something your willing to run on your computer you can try EXE Explorer. It will show a whole bunch of info on executables including if it's 32 or 64bit.


26

Many people have the excellent 7-zip installed, and have added the 7-Zip folder to their PATH. 7-zip understands file formats other than ZIP and RAR, such as MSI files and PE executables. Simply use the command line 7z.exe on the PE file (Exe or DLL) in question: 7z l some.exe | more 7z l some.exe | findstr CPU Output will include lines as follows, with ...


22

I would use "purge" instead of "remove". ~# apt-get purge ".*:i386" ~# dpkg --remove-architecture i386 The "purge" keyword removes all configuration files associated with the packages you're uninstalling.


19

The 64-bit version of Process Explorer can tell you. Simply run the executable and open the process's properties window. On the main tab there's an entry which says "Image:32 Bit" or "Image:64 Bit".


15

Most simple way (when the data aren't confidential) I find that Virustotal File detail is the simplest way to find out if a binary is 32 bit or 64 bit. The Additional information option provides in addition much helpful informations about the file.


13

You are confused here on what the problem is. USB doesn't care if the operating system is 32 bit. 64 bit, 16 bit or 256 bit. What the problem is: there are no 64 bit drivers for your device. You might be able to use a VM, like Windows 7s XP mode to load the 32 bit drivers and OS.


13

I really am looking for the bitness of Windows The "ideal" solution would be a single step The shortest solution requires requires pressing 2 keys. Press +Pause (i.e., "Windows" key + Pause key) Windows Vista, 7, 8 and 10: Look at the "System type" entry: It will display 32-bit Operating System for a 32-bit version of Windows, and It will display 64-...


12

The method of running an executable & then checking in process explorer or similar tool, has some obvious drawbacks: We have to execute the process. For the short lived processes (like echo hello world types.), process explorer might not even register that a new process has started. Dumpbin.exe method can solve the purpose probably. Another ...


11

Here's a Powershell solution, no external dependencies or anything. Open Powershell, paste the function in there (hit Enter twice so that you return to the prompt), then use it as in my examples below the function: function Test-is64Bit { param($FilePath=“$env:windir\notepad.exe”) [int32]$MACHINE_OFFSET = 4 [int32]$PE_POINTER_OFFSET = 60 [...


9

Windows 64 Bit includes several programs in both 32bit and 64bit versions (like Internet Explorer). This is one reason for the higher disk space requirement. The RAM is probably due to similar reasons and that the 64bit pointer just requires twice as much space.


8

Even an executable marked as 32-bit can run as 64-bit if, for example, it's a .NET executable that can run as 32- or 64-bit. For more information see https://stackoverflow.com/questions/3782191/how-do-i-determine-if-a-net-application-is-32-or-64-bit, which has an answer that says that the CORFLAGS utility can be used to determine how a .NET application will ...


7

Is your PC 64-bit? Yes. Processor(s): 1 Processor(s) Installed. [01]: x64 Family 6 Model 15 Stepping 13 GenuineIntel ~2000 Mhz This is really the only part of all the information you’ve dumped that is relevant. x64 indicates the CPU uses the 64-bit assembly/instruction set.


6

This was very difficult to fix, so I am answering my own question. Much debt is owed to the others who have blogged about the various components of this fix! This answer assumes you are running Debian amd64 architecture. It also assumes your Debian installation is already multiarch-aware. (That is beyond this question.) Get the Citrix ICA Client (...


6

Yes, that should work. In previous versions of Windows, the product key would work for either the 32-bit or 64-bit version and there is no indication yet that this has changed. Ultimately, what Microsoft care about is that you have a legitimate key. The specifications you listed will work with Windows 10 to the best of my knowledge. Edit: I just found ...


6

When 32-bit programs access certain parts of the Registry, they are subject to WOW64 redirection. For compatibility purposes, they get a different view of the Registry than what's actually there. Therefore, installer programs that are 32-bit don't see your changes. You need to also change the values in this path: HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\WOW6432Node\...


6

I think this is probably your machine. Worth taking a look at the bottom of the laptop and confirming the exact model number though. http://www.toshiba.co.uk/discontinued-products/satellite-l350-170/ The good news is that you should be able to run a 64-bit OS on that thing. The bad news is that at least according to Toshiba you can install a maximum of ...


6

Press the Windows Key () + Pause to open the system information window. The information you are looking for is in the System type field. On a laptop, the Pause key may not be readily accessible - it might be necessary to hold the Fn key too, and the Pause key is often hidden as an alternate function of the Shift key. On Windows 10 and maybe 8, this window ...


5

In common usage, the reason to go 64-bit is to make use of more RAM (memory) in your system. In Windows, 32-bit is limited to a little over 2GB of RAM available to programs, while 64-bit is virtually limitless. To benefit from it, your processor must support 64-bit. The D.E.P. and virtualization are not related to performance in common desktop usage. So, ...


5

No, there's no real difference other than organization. At least, there shouldn't be. I've definitely had issues with programs that can't handle ( and ) in their path names, or otherwise are poorly programmed and only work from C:\Program Files\, though. You can install the programs wherever you like, or wherever they have to be installed to work.


5

From personal experience, dxdiag can also be used to determine if there is a problem with the 32 or 64 bit portions of the drivers. For example, running dxdiag in 32 bit might show no acceleration for DirectDraw or D3D; yet running DXDiag64 might show everything as fine. This is useful when trying to figure out video issues, particularly since most games ...


5

I have verified on Windows 7 64-bit with IE11 and UAC turned on, and the link given by @Ƭᴇcʜιᴇ007 is correct: Go in the IE menu Tools to Internet Options, Advanced tab, under Security, and check "Enable Enhanced Protected Mode". On newer version of Windows one also needs to check "Enable 64-bit processes for Enhanced Protected Mode". Re-launching IE was ...


4

64 bit applications use larger variables and thus need more RAM. An int (variable integer) on 32bit is generally 2 to the 32nd power, and on 64bit it's generally 2 to the 64th power. As for the space requirement, Windows installs both 32bit and 64bit versions of it's default applications like Internet Explorer.


4

My two cents will be just download dependency walker and check what for architecture has been used in one of the executable file. How to use it: Just simply download app, start it up, click on open icon → find an *.exe file → select and on the bottom after reflection scan is done you see a grid with data where one column has "architecture" details in it (...


4

How to add 32/64 bit test to your context menu Create a text file named exetest.reg and containing this code: Windows Registry Editor Version 5.00 ; What will appear in the contextual menu when right-clicking on a .exe file [HKEY_CLASSES_ROOT\exefile\shell\command32_64] @="32/64 bit test" ; What to do with it ; here, %1 is the file given as argument of ...


4

If you are on Windows 7, on a Windows Explorer, right click on the executable and select Properties. At the properties window select the Compatibility tab. If under the Compatibility Mode section you see Windows XP, this is a 32 bit executable. If you see Windows Vista, it is 64 bit.


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