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226

The concern isn't really when it's in the fridge but when you take it out. The cold laptop/parts will pull the water out of the air AFTER it's taken out of the fridge, even if it was in a plastic bag. Think of a glass of water, it doesn't 'sweat' when it's in the fridge but you take it out on a hot day and it does. The other concern is, depending on the ...


158

They are heat sinks. You definitely should put them back on, as they are there for a reason. If the chips below it get too hot, they could be damaged. I would purchase some thermal adhesive to reapply them. Do not buy thermal paste, as that will not bond them back together. Be sure to clean the heat sinks and the chips with some rubbing alcohol to ...


108

As you suspect, it is not a very good idea. The cooler air inside the fridge can quickly condense the vapor normally found in the air, producing little droplets of water on the coolest parts (such as the motherboard). Even if you find it effective, it may result in damage to your computer. I simply suggest you not do it. Read USGS website for more ...


78

No, adding more would be bad. What you want to do is to clean off all existing paste (use isopropyl alcohol if you can) and apply a bit of fresh paste. If you're talking about the layer that comes with a new cooler, you can usually use it directly - you don't need to use your own at all. Replacing paste is only really worthwhile for old paste. Also, the ...


64

These are heat sinks and must be in place for reliable operation. The shape of those copper devices is designed to dissipate heat effectively from the part on which they are placed. The "waffle" shape is intended to increase surface area, making it easier to remove heat from the device. The heat sinks in question are responsible for cooling SMD inductors (...


57

Use a small piece of plastic (like a pen cap) to stop the fan from spinning. That is the easiest way to isolate the cause. It's okay to stop it for a few seconds while on. Most fan noise is due to failure of the bearings. Sometimes lifting the sticker on the hub and oiling with 3 in 1 lube will help with the noise.


51

As others already said, you're killing your laptop with the condensation. The water will usually not lead to a short circuit immediately, but instead lead to rust buildup first before the final shutdown after a couple times in the freezer. Better solutions: You say the laptop is still under warranty: Use the warranty. Bottled air to clean the fans without ...


47

I have a similar overheating problem with my MacBook. The fan was always spinning away. My solution was to freeze an ice pack (I think that's what they're called). Wrap it in a tea towel (to absorb moisture) and sit my MacBook on that. After a few minutes or so, the fan stopped and my MacBook was happily cooled.


45

These are indeed heatsinks, but in contrast to what everyone else has said, these are part of a bolt-on aftermarket up-sell modification "upgrade" offered by the laptop distributor, XoticPC, and are for all intents and purposes largely useless. (See : Copper Cooling Upgrade) The cheap quality of adhesive they used to sticker these things on (wherever they ...


42

In short, no Liquid cooling is still mainly for bragging rights. Getting those extra MHz from hardware and pushing for extra benchmark points. Will you need something aftermarket to cool your system? Absolutely. Of course keeping temperatures as low as possible is always a thing we strive for, but you have to weigh up the costs and risks to the ...


38

I suspect it's unlikely, though it depends on what you mean by colour. There are three fundamental modes of heat transfer for any material, and only one of them is directly affected by colour. Heat is transferred from the heat source to the heat sink, and from the heat sink to the air by conduction. Most heatsinks are made of copper (heavy, and relatively ...


38

Will it work? Sure. Is it "safe"? Maybe Modern CPUs, especially mobile ones, feature thermal throttling in order to protect them from extreme temperatures. What this means is that if a fan fails while the system is in operation then the CPU will limit itself in order to prevent damage caused by overheating. Your system performance can be severely hampered ...


35

The hard drive has a temperature sensor (or multiple temperature sensors - they might be used for internal control, self-test etc...) inside, and this data is passed through SMART (in fact, this is a standardized SMART parameter).


28

Basic Differences A three pin connector is basically power (5/12 volt), ground, and signal. The signal wire measures how fast the fan is moving without any controls for the fan speed. With this type, fan speed is typically controlled by increasing or decreasing the voltage over the power wire. A four pin connector is a little different than the three pin ...


26

These settings adjust the power and cooling limits of your processor. Config TDP Level (cTDP) determines the maximum power which may be used by the processor. This feature was introduced in Ivy Bridge. Not all processors support all settings. See: Ivy Bridge Configurable TDP Detailed. High TDP (cTDP up) increases the power and clock rate limits to enable ...


25

I have the exact same laptop model and the exact same issue. It is the fan blades rubbing against the fan's housing. I was able to open up the fan assembly and pull out the fan by the blades, as it was on a spindle. I used a needle to put some mineral oil into the shaft to lube it. I noticed when removing the needle, there was dirt that stuck to the ...


23

This Wikipedia article has some information/discussion about that. I only repeat some links below. For the complete discussion you can look at the article. Heat Sink Color From http://www.radianheatsinks.com/support/faqs.html How does the color of a heat sink impact its thermal performance? In natural convection a black or dark colored heatsink will ...


20

If you can't disconnect or otherwise stop each fan (some may be hard to reach), you can use an old mechanic's trick. Place the tip of a long screwdriver against the body of fan and then press the side of your head (a spot near your ear) against the end of screwdriver's handle. The sound travels through the tool to your ear.


19

That would be a thermal pad, they are placed there to allow heat to travel more easily out of whatever chip it was placed against. Probably should add that they are also used when a perfect seal isn't possible, I.E. A space more then 1mm between chip/processor and cooling system. So if doesn't look like it was compressed much, may want to replace it with ...


19

As others have already responded, the blocks are heatsinks. But I don't believe the location in the image is where they are supposed to go. In fact, I don't think they're normally supposed to be in there at all! As you can see in other images of the GE60 motherboard, the waffles are nowhere to be found: Did you happen to buy your laptop used? If so, you may ...


18

No, this is not safe. Stop using your computer right now. Maybe, just maybe, the CPU will protect itself from immediate death by thermal throttling or emergency shutdown. However, the fan in a laptop does not only cool the CPU, it also cools other components in the system. Anything in your system may break including irreparable damages to main board, ...


16

It should be, given that in the same amount of time, it could've been attached to a CPU and has to enure that as well. If you don't trust it, just scrape it off and apply fresh coolingpaste (which is different than those strips. The paste can actually dry out. Journeyman Geek points out that if its slightly hard it should be ok, if it crumbles like dried ...


15

No, the temperature monitor is embedded into the HDD. It's a more recent addition and you will only see it with some of the newer SCSI disks. Anything older than a few years won't have the sensors. It's actually a part of the S.M.A.R.T. suite that reports around 30 attributes. (http://www.hdsentinel.com/smart/index.php) The software just pulls it from the ...


15

A three wire fan reports its speed. Add a fourth wire, and the fan's speed can be varied by the motherboard. The simplest PC fan requires two wires. The red wire provides power (+12 VDC), the black wire is ground (0 V). Applying power to will start the fan running full speed. If a modern fan's blades are stopped, the fan's drive circuitry interrupts power ...


14

LGA115x heatsinks are compatible. From source 3: Noctua's info sheet for their new NH-D15S cooler, stating it's compatible with LGA 1151 (Skylake), and the installation manual, which shows using the same design of rigid, nonadjustable backplate with fixed posts as for the current 1150/5/6, with no special instructions for 1151, so the mobo holes and ...


13

The condensation that could form when you remove the laptop from the fridge would make me worry enough to not to do it at all. I have seen people that have drilled holes in the body for cooling and other crazy things like that in the past. Maybe it's time to upgrade the machine? EDIT from comments: Stop using Google Chrome for Mac. It seems to consume far ...


13

Absolutely not. Thermal paste should be just enough to fill any gaps. A thicker than required layer of thermal paste reduces the efficiency of the paste. It is also not a good idea to mix different thermal pastes unless you know they are chemically compatible. Additives in one paste may break down additives in the other, producing compounds that may degrade ...


12

Those are known as Thermally-Conductive Pads, and are used as the equivalent of thermal paste. They're usually made from wax or silicone, and become very soft and pliable when heated up. They're not as good as thermal paste, but they are less messy and much easier to deal with, so this makes them a good choice when heat transfer efficiency doesn't have to ...


11

I'll just put this here as an alternate solution: Un-plug each fan, one-by-one from the motherboard (or from the PSU, depending on the fan), and when you stop hearing the noise, plug them back in one-by-one until you hear it again (to verify that the one you thought was making the noise actually was). I'd do the CPU fan last; everything else will be fine ...


10

While I can't find an authoritative reference (ie. from manufacturers), there is a definitive "yes" around the internet. There are many posts on many forums confirming that 1156/1155/1150 are compatible. Examples at: overclock.net, Tom's Hardware, guru3d. What I noticed myself when Haswell first came out: existing coolers (such as the Noctua NH-D14, as an ...


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