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70

There are a number of suggestions provided in Jeff Moser's post related to this. A Proposed Solution Let’s borrow an ancient yet incredibly useful idea: if it’s really important to get your facts right about something, be sure to have at least two or three witnesses. This is especially true concerning matters of life and death but it also comes ...


62

We have actually covered this in some detail already on Security SE Storing account credentials for spouse/loved one? How to prepare for protecting identity after death? How to secure identity after someone dies? Is there a digital “safety deposit box” equivalent? These posts go into detail about what you can and can't share - there may be some legal/...


47

The most straightforward way ? Export all urls with the corresponding passwords, together with a short manual where applicable, to print them out and pass to your wife. If what you said (adopting your ways of digital security not being an option), I can't see any other, more practical way of handing that stuff over. Either put the printouts in a safe, or ...


37

Use KeePass and store all your passwords in a KeePass file, encrypting it with a master password. KeePass encrypts the contents of the file with the master password you use. If you need file mobility, you can put the KeePass file on DropBox (or Google Drive, etc), so that way the file is on all the machines you sync up with your favorite "web drive" tool. ...


22

If you are able to login to each others email accounts, that solves most of the problems because that is how most online services allow users to change passwords. If you want to get a little more fancy and if you use gmail, there are ways to generate a list of "one-time passwords". Just print out a list of these one time passwords and give it your spouse. ...


21

Although it turned out to be irrelevant to your situation, for the benefit of future searchers, the answer to the actual question "Manage another user's credentials for network access" is: runas /user:serviceaccountname "%windir%\system32\cmdkey.exe /add:server.domain.com /user:username /pass:password" This will create a credential in serviceaccountname's ...


15

Here's what I did: write your LastPass master password down on a piece of paper, and put it in the safe or your bank's safe-deposit box. Alternatively, have your wife create a LastPass account, and do a secure-share of your important items with her. You can of course do both (I did). In any case, make sure to leave a note (in your will, or your safe, ...


14

There are quite a few threads on answers.microsoft.com where Microsoft engineers confirm that this is indeed a credential created by Microsoft products: Unknown generic credentials in windows 7 - virtualapp/didlogical A Microsoft employee called Divya R says: Virtualapp/Didlogical is a credential that is stored when you use any of the Windows Live ...


10

Your guess is correct. Specifying that the username is incorrect is a form of Information Leakage. Using just the login form, an attacker could determine if a specific email address/username has an account on the website.


9

That's a lot of info to pass to her. Specially because it's not only passwords, but also where the files are located. Some online, some locally. But, no matter how easy you try to make this, it will still be a lot for her to deal with. So I'd separate into three categories: Things she can easily retrieve herself Important stuff and stuff she'll need ...


7

A similar problem is adressed by Cory Doctorow in Context. I’d split the passphrase in two, and give half of it to my wife, and the other half to my parents’ lawyer in Toronto. The lawyer is out of reach of a British court order, and my wife’s half of the passphrase is useless without the lawyer’s half (and she’s out of reach of a Canadian court ...


7

This has been addressed at the IT Security Stack Exchange site. It's a lot harder for an attacker to guess valid username-password combinations than just passwords. Once the existence of an account is confirmed, it can be targeted (perhaps with some outside research on sites like Facebook). It's also a lot more convenient for web sites to return a generic ...


6

Use Windows Credential Manager. Create a new Windows credential with the following details: dbservername.domain.com:1433 domain\UserId Password Also create a shortcut for SSMS with the following in TARGET: C:\Windows\System32\runas.exe /user:domain\userid /netonly "C:\Program Files (x86)\Microsoft SQL Server\100\Tools\binn\VSShell\Common7\IDE\Ssms.exe -...


6

I use the KeePass AutoType feature to log in to various RDP sessions in the network. On the Auto-Type tab I add a custom sequence for a specific window. To add the entry I use the default sequence but add {DOWN} to the beginning of it. This means that it doesn't matter what username is currently displayed in the security details as the {DOWN} sequence ...


5

The following solution works perfectly if you have sufficient privileges on your local machine to edit its host file: Open the Windows host file ("hosts") from \Windows\System32\drivers\etc in notepad In Windows 7/8 you might have to grant yourself full control permissions on the file through properties > edit permissions > Add > define 'full control' ...


4

A cheap solution if you only want two connections from your machine to a remote machine is two setup one connection using the target machines name and the second one using the target machines IP address. This fools Windows-7 ( and others ) into believing that the connection is to two different machines and it then doesn't confuse the credentials.


4

Following the answers here Samba+Windows: Allow multiple connections by different users?, I figured there is no solution from the windows client. So I added several aliases to my linux server: /etc/samba/smb.conf [global] unix extensions = no netbios aliases = ALIAS1 ALIAS2 ALIAS3 wide links = yes workgroup = WORKGROUP os level = 20 ...


4

Windows should be identical, except for the fact that your home directory is in a different location. Try looking in the %userprofile% directory for .netrc. If it's missing you can create it in Explorer by creating a new file named .netrc. (the final . will disappear). You may need to create an environmental variable named HOME that points to %USERPROFILE%...


4

I had the same issue and found two sets of credentials for OneDrive in Credential Manager. I deleted the incorrect set and rebooted. My OneDrive now syncs to the correct library.


4

For Enter-PSSession cmdlet "-Credential" is not a mandatory parameter. So if you don't specify credential, your current credential will be used.


4

The answer: No. As Schroeder mentions in his comment, the way this is to be done is to require staff to log into the computer while it is still connected in the office. There is a setting that can be configured in Group Policy that tells a computer how many credentials it can recall, which allows a staffmember or two or three to login to a computer in the ...


4

Use the built-in utility cmdkey to add the credentials. Download and use the Microsoft Sysinternals utility PsExec: psexec -s to run a cmdkey as SYSTEM. Technically, it's Microsoft, therefore not third-party. CMDKEY.exe Create, list or delete stored user names, passwords or credentials. Syntax cmdkey [{/add:TargetName|/generic:TargetName}] ...


3

Place a file, encrypted if you wish, on your system containing all your user IDs and passwords. Create a separate account that has access to this file. (Use a separate account so you don't need to worry about the "cleaning lady" accessing the file through your wife's standard account.) Write down the account name and password (and the encryption key, if ...


3

Just my two cents: This is a somewhat subjective question but in general, mainstream services such as Amazon have a greater level of security than your personal computer. This isn't to say they're safer than storing information on your HDD but they're not necessarily less safe either. On the subject of Sony, they were a target for attack due to a ...


3

With VBS scripting, you could use something like $username = InputBox("Type your username", vbOKOnly) $password = InputBox("Type your password", vbOKOnly)


3

stopServer.sh and startServer.sh have and should have the same privilege/restriction. Maybe the server Admin had restriction the stopServer.sh to admin users only. But I'm pretty sure that isn't the case in the default installation. EDIT I recheck, here the new info: The startServer doesn't need user/pass even if security is enable The stopServer need ...


3

According to someone at Channel9: Official answer: Yes. This credential is created by and used by Wndows[sic] Live. See this thread. I have no idea whether the user in question is actually a microsoft employee though.


3

While I like lastpass and use keepass at work, I think this is a perfect application for an IronKey. Buy an IronKey. Assign it a password that both you and your wife know. Put links and passwords to web sites on the ironkey in a text file. Lock it up in a fire proof safe. This won't solve any issues you will have if you use 2-factor fobs, but you can ...


3

If you can access the remote computer, you could add your service account to the local Users group and match the username/password to what you would use. Don't forget to give it administrative privileges. Then goto the remote login tab in the system menu, and add that user as someone who is allowed to remotely login. This is what I do when I need to hit ...


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