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30

Postfix and Dovecot do different things. Postfix is an MTA, or Mail Transfer Agent. It accepts mail from the outside world and from local sources, and routes it to its destination. This may involve an smtp connection to another machine, or it may involve delivering it to a local delivery agent or writing it directly to an mbox. When an MTA goes wrong, ...


11

I was able to fix my problem by changing the postfix main.cf configuration to read: smtpd_relay_restrictions = permit_mynetworks permit_sasl_authenticated defer_unauth_destination instead of using smtpd_recipient_resrictions It turns out that after postfix 2.10.0, smtpd_relay_restrictions should be used instead of ...


8

Problem solved by using correct spacing like so: smtps inet n - - - - smtpd -o syslog_name=postfix/smtps # <<< line 23 -o smtpd_tls_wrappermode=yes -o smtpd_sasl_auth_enable=yes -o smtpd_client_restrictions=permit_sasl_authenticated,reject


7

I would expect it needs the < to tell it to set the config value to the contents of the file instead of to the actual string /etc/ssl/certs/dovecot.pem (which obviously isn't a valid SSL certificate).


7

According to the docs mentioned by Stefan this is now possible but disabled by default. You can add internal_mail_filter_classes = bounce to your config for bounces to be filtered just as any other mail (including signing filter). This will work well if you only have signing filter. Though you may encounter problems when you have other filters. You should ...


5

This uninstalls dovecot in debian: systemctl stop dovecot systemctl disable dovecot apt-get purge dovecot-core apt-get autoremove dovecot-core


4

From the Dovecot documentation: When Dovecot starts up for the first time, it generates new 512bit and 1024bit Diffie Hellman parameters and saves them into /var/lib/dovecot/ssl-parameters.ssl. After the initial creation they're by default regenerated every week. Most likely this is the case.


4

Dovecot creates the maildir structure so that an email arrives. You don't need to worry about it. You can configure dovecot to create some mailboxes (folders) automatically when you login first time. For example, created/edit /etc/dovecot/conf.d/15-mailboxes.conf: namespace inbox { mailbox Trash { special_use = \Trash auto = subscribe } }


4

Encryption of outgoing traffic has not much to do with any of the above. When sending mail, your Postfix connects to Gmail (so neither port-forwarding nor MX records are involved) and acts like a TLS client (i.e. like a web browser, not a web server); it can provide its own certificate but doesn't need to. Additionally, Postfix has separate settings for ...


4

I recently hit this issue, using letsencrypt for my certificate, and found that I had mistakenly put a link to cert.pem in my dovecot ssl_cert setting instead of fullchain.pem. So I was seeing the error you report when my dovecot 10-ssl.conf file had this line in it: ssl_cert = </etc/letsencrypt/live/example.com/cert.pem And everything worked when I ...


4

It seems like since wednesday Google Mail Servers no longer accept intermediate certificates signed using the sha1 hash algorithm. Running the command openssl s_client -connect server.example.com:995 -CAfile cacert.pem -showcerts revealed to me that the mail server was (and still is) providing the sha1 version of the intermediate certificate. I don't know ...


3

Finally found the answer for this: I had to change a small configuration in /etc/dovecot/dovecot.conf (on Ubuntu Server 14.04) mail_location = maildir:~/Maildir:LAYOUT=fs Source: http://wiki2.dovecot.org/MailLocation/Maildir


3

I do not have your environment, but I quote from the Dovecot - Community Help Wiki (the part in bold is that way in the original text) : NOTE: Dovecot will NOT work in an encrypted directory/folder. Dovecot would just complain about permissions and won't work. One answer is to create a 2nd user account that has an unencrypted home directory. We have ...


3

Dovecot's grace_quota does not work as you expect it. From the Dovecot manual on quota: With v2.2+ by default the last mail can bring user over quota. This is useful to allow user to actually unambiguously become over quota instead of fail some of the last larger mails and pass through some smaller mails. Of course the last mail shouldn't be allowed to ...


3

This entry in the log—where it says “starting up without any protocols”—is the big clue: Aug 10 16:28:55 domain.tld dovecot[3122]: master: Dovecot v2.2.33.2 (d6601f4ec) starting up without any protocols (core dumps disabled) It seems like Dovecot isn’t aware of any protocols being set on your install so it’s just starting up as-is. And according to this ...


2

I think I actually worked it out. I found this page in the Dovecot documentation (not well highlighted I must admit! I completely missed the tab at the top of the page): http://wiki2.dovecot.org/Upgrading/2.0?highlight=%28unix_listener%29 I reverted to the original code block originally documented on the website: protocol lda { log_path = /home/vmail/...


2

Option a) Reinstall the package, and immediately afterwards remove it. Option b) tweak the post-rm script file so that it does not call doveconf. Option c) tweak doveconf itself so it is a clone of /bin/true.


2

Found the problems: There is a whitespace before the scan unix line. There should be a linebreak between the -o disable_dns_lookups=yes and 127.0.0.1:10026 lines. Correct format: # Must begin with NO SPACES scan unix - - n - 16 smtp -o smtp_data_done_timeout=1200 -o smtp_send_xforward_command=yes -o ...


2

Dovecot is configured to listen for auth requests at private/auth: unix_listener /var/spool/postfix/private/auth However, you're telling Postfix to connect to an entirely different location: smtpd_sasl_path = smtpd – in fact, you're (almost) telling it to send the auth requests to its own SMTP daemon, which isn't going to understand them at all, much ...


2

This has probably nothing to do with an open relay (which you can check with this tool), but rather you are getting backscatter mail. When a spammer or worm sends mail with forged sender addresses, innocent sites are flooded with undeliverable mail notifications. This is called backscatter mail. With Postfix, you know that you're a backscatter ...


2

You probably want to use the reject_sender_login_mismatch parameter in your smtpd_sender_restrictions configuration, so you would have something like this: smtpd_sender_restrictions = permit_mynetworks, reject_sender_login_mismatch, permit_sasl_authenticated, ... This will allow mynetworks to send e-mails, but before permitting SASL ...


2

https://askubuntu.com/questions/451406/where-did-etc-init-d-dovecot-go-in-14-04 tells: doveadm reload - in 14.04 the initscript was removed for not understandable reasons.


2

It appears Thunderbird does not automatically sync junk or trash folders by default (tested latest stable and beta versions on Windows 10). The solution was to include junk folder in message synchronization settings (offline use settings). Tools > Account settings > Synchronization and storage > Advanced > Select junk folder.


2

This is how is solved it (it took 7 months): apt install dovecot-sieve dovecot-managesieved nano /etc/dovecot/conf.d/90-plugin.conf Add or set in: protocol lmtp { mail_plugins = $mail_plugins sieve auth_socket_path = /var/run/dovecot/auth-master } nano /etc/dovecot/sieve.conf Add in: require ["fileinto", "mailbox"]; if header :...


2

Your problem appears to be that the authoritative DNS servers for dynv6.net are sending corrupt DNS responses. This is what I saw when I first attempted to resolve your MX record: $ dig mx futuregadgetlab.dynv6.net ; <<>> DiG 9.10.3-P4-Ubuntu <<>> mx futuregadgetlab.dynv6.net ;; global options: +cmd ;; Got answer: ;; ->>HEADER&...


2

I don't have exactly the same configuration as you, but I have virtual mailboxes (for groups) and the special mailboxes were not automatically created. I had to write a script in order to do it (script executed in incron): ManageGroup() { if [[ -d "/var/mail/group/${1}" ]]; then cat <<EOMaint | doveadm exec imap -u "${1}" 1 select Sent 2 select ...


1

You're being stopped by the lack of NAT loopback. You might be able to enable it on your router.


1

The iptables strategy is not the appropiate one IMHO, because you take for granted that the DELE command will be always sent as a whole in the same TCP packet, when it doesn't need to and the packet might be split into several packets. So that would result in some messages blocked and some not. I'd consider using the 'lazy expunge' plugin for Dovecot, which ...


1

The failure with setgroups() comes from the fact that the user on the machine, where Dovecot runs has more than 16 groups assigned to it. Run id -G <user> or id <user> as root (or as that user) to see the number of groups. Unfortunately is macOS assigning a ton of groups to users to run fine-grained access control for stuff like screen-sharing. ...


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