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44

VGA is the only analog signal from the above mentioned ones so it's already an explanation for difference. Using the adapter can further worsen your situation. some further reading: http://www.digitaltrends.com/computing/hdmi-vs-dvi-vs-displayport-vs-vga/


43

You need to add a new panel to the second screen, and add a task manager to that. Right-click on the background of the second screen -> Add Panel -> Empty Panel. If you know how to move panels and add widgets to the panel, then move the panel to where you want it, add the tasks widgets, then set it to also only show widgets from the current screen. If ...


32

Some monitors have multiple input possibilities and it is possible to select e.g., PC1 or PC2 for input. Check your monitor for this. If it is not possible then you can use a KVM switch to switch your Keyboard, Mouse and Monitor between different machines.


30

The only benefit to HDMI is that you don't need a second cable for audio. HDMI essentially combines a DVI connection with audio. Actually, because of this, you can acutally get converters that go from HDMI to DVI for a few bucks. Because it already has a DVI connection in it, the quality over the HDMI connection would be identical. The only reason you'd ...


26

I'm writing this on a 2560x1600 Dual Link DVI monitor connected to a computer using HDMI 1.4. Stop searching for HDMI to DVI-DL adapters. All adapters that you'll find are passive single-link adapters, even though they may be advertised as dual-link. Although a HDMI 1.4 to Dual Link DVI adapter is possible to implement using an Analog Devices ADV7619 297 ...


23

There are two different types of DVI ports your laptop may have: DVI-I or DVI-D. DVI-I carries digital and analogue signals, DVI-D just digital signals. You can connect any single-link DVI cable (DVI-I as well as DVI-D) to a dual-link DVI-I port. You can also connect a single-link DVI-D cable to a dual-link DVI-D port. However, you cannot connect a single-...


17

TLDR: My fix was using a much shorter and better quality cable. I managed to find a solution to this not that long ago on a brand new monitor that required me to buy a cheap 5m DVI to HDMI cable (I couldn't get anything else quickly). Like you the problem was highly dependant on what was on screen and seemed more prevalent with darker images. When moving ...


12

Assuming brightness,contract and sharpness are the same in both cases, there could be 2 other reasons why text is sharper with DVI/HDMI: The first has already been stated, VGA is analog so will need to go through an analog to digital conversion inside the monitor, this will theoretically degrade image quality. Secondly, assuming you are using Windows there ...


10

You are right: HDMI, DP and DVI-D use digital signals, while VGA uses analog signals. You'll need to buy adapters that convert those digital inputs to analog outputs (so yeah, no "passive" adapters). VGA degrades quality quickly with bad/long cables as well as with high resolution displays (it'll need to send analog signals, changing the output voltage at ...


9

That's a passive adaptor. It converts a DVI-I into a analogue VGA port. More precisely, it breaks out the analogue portions of a DVI-I connector. It will not work in a proper DVI-D port (or an improper one with a DVI-I socket). To actually convert DVI-D (or any real digital out - displayport, hdmi ect) to VGA you need an active adaptor. If its a DVI-I ...


8

The short answer is that DVI doesn't do sound, and HDMI does. Does your TV support HDMI? Then you should just use a straight HDMI cable. Does your laptop have an audio-out port? If the laptop has a headphone jack and the TV has RCA inputs you could get a 3.5mm to RCA cable and use that to connect them, then you should get the laptop sound out of the TV ...


8

So, I've finally received my MBP and the Dual-link-DVI to Mini DisplayPort adapter (simply adapter from now on). The Korean monitor has been more than worth it, it works superbly absolutely great over the digital link. The adapter doesn't work at all if you don't plug the USB connector in also. If you plug it in, connect the display, then remove the USB ...


8

There's a good chance that the noise you see is the result of your VGA signal (which is analogue) not being up to par. Switching to a digital connection will likely (but not definitely) resolve the noise. DVI can carry both digital and analogue data. You will want to make sure you are using DVI-D and not DVI-A. According to the data sheet for the ThinkPad ...


8

No you can't. According to NVIDIA's specs:- NVIDIA GeForce GTX 560 Ti, Graphics Card Installation Guide. (see page 10), the GTX560Ti only supports 2 monitors. You can't even use 2 DVI and the mini HDMI port simultaneously because of the card internal wires layout, they use the same connection. Try plugging the third monitor into the onboard graphic port if ...


7

DVI's clock speed determines the maximum bandwidth, which is resolution times refresh rate. You can get a higher resolution by lowering the refresh rate - some LCD monitors will let you run them at, say, 50Hz instead of 60Hz refresh, and while the screen is a little slower to update, they don't flicker like the old CRTs used to. Single-link DVI has a ...


7

I own a 2048 x 1536 resolution monitor that has as its only input option a single VGA cable. It works very well with a standard ATI x800 video card. In theory, the resolution/amount of information that can be sent through any cable is mostly limited by the processing on either side of the cable. For instance, standard coax cable, used for antennas and SD ...


7

I went down this road for a while and then decided to use Remote Desktop which is built into all versions of Windows - it gets better with more controls with Windows 7. Made sure the two devices are on the same high speed switch. No cost no switches, FAST..just as fast as sitting at the keyboard...same keyboard same mouse....AND cut and paste between ...


7

HDMI shouldn't cause a difference in image quality vs DVI. However, you will have to worry about bandwidth issues. These issues really only occur if you're intending on playing computer games. Over HDMI, I found that some games I tried to play would cap the refresh rate at an abysmal 24 Hz, which translated into a lot of image tearing and headaches. However, ...


7

HDMI vs. DVI Here are a few other facts beside the audio being included with HDMI. From Wikipedia HDMI is backward compatible with single-link Digital Visual Interface digital video (DVI-D or DVI-I, but not DVI-A). No signal conversion is required when an adapter or asymmetric cable is used, so there is no loss of video quality. This means that HDMI is ...


7

They're just there to stop them falling out of the sockets. A lot of the older D-type connector like serial, parallel and SCSI ports have them. The cable coming out is relatively heavy and is easy to knock out, hence the screws.


7

The others make some good points, but the main reason is an obvious clock and phase mismatch. The VGA is analog and is subject to interference and mismatch of the analog sending and receiving sides. Normally one would use a pattern like this: http://www.lagom.nl/lcd-test/clock_phase.php And adjust the clock and phase of the monitor to get the best match ...


7

As per the Wiki article on DVI: A passive DVI-to-VGA adapter. This adapter will not work with a DVI-D output. It requires a DVI-I or DVI-A output to get the analog signal to a VGA input (even if the adapter looks like a DVI-D). A more expensive active adapter (or converter) is required to connect DVI-D to VGA. As such you would need an active adapter in ...


6

Unfortunately, a converter is the only possibility if your monitor is DVI-D ONLY. I'm going to simplify and summarize the information contained within this Wikipedia article in a way that you can understand. There are two separate DVI specifications you need to be aware of: DVI-D and DVI-I. If your monitor requires DVI-D and not DVI-I (i.e. if it does not ...


6

According to the user manual for that card (which is downloadable via the product page on MSI.com, if you look at the diagram of the card on page 2, it states under an asterisk: The DVI-I port and D-Sub port of this card do not support dual monitor. DSUB refers to the VGA connector (which is part of the DSUB connector family). So it seems that you might ...


6

Before buying miniDP to DVI adapter, I tested with Ubuntu booted from USB and, as was expected - it worked even without AMD drivers, all 3 monitors, like a charm. So, seems that Windows 8.1 changed some configs and now it try to autoconfig only Eyefinity mode, even if it's disabled, or something... Also, report this bug to Microsoft would be nice :) P.S. ...


6

Any VGA only monitor in this day and age is seriously obsolete - most older monitors would be at least DVI capable. Your video card reflects that and has no ports that can be "passively" converted into VGA. Looking at your ports, that's a purely DVI-D port. It won't work. More accurately, the adaptor won't fit, and the analogue pins don't exist. If you ...


6

If you look at the Wikipedia article for DVI, especially the pinout, you'll see that DVI also can carry analog signals (the variant called "DVI-A"). That's why DVI to VGA adapters work: They take the the analog signals from the DVI-A pins, and route them to the corresponding VGA pins. So if your graphics card doesn't support analog pins on the DVI connector ...


5

I just started using this from iogear at work to share two monitors, keyboard/mouse between two computers. While the product is a bit pricey, it is definitely worth it. I think you can get it on newegg for about $300.00. I think you may find this product will do everything you need it to do. http://www.iogear.com/product/GCS1642/


5

Late to the party, but it may prove useful: ( http://www.overclock.net/t/692956/just-got-rid-of-green-dots-on-screen ) The problem is simply because ATI drivers set 2D clocks too low (157Mhz Core,300Mhz memory). At higher resolutions like 1680x1050 these clocks are not sufficient and causes this problem so you need to up them to get rid of these green dots ...


5

Most modern cards (your included) are powerful enough to drive at least two heads (monitors). In your case you have two digital outputs (HDMI and DVI) and one analog (VGA). You should be able to power your two monitors using any combination of these ports however you best bet for quality would be to get a monitor that supports HDMI input or a converter that ...


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