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If you are using SAMBA as AD you have to add ldap server require strong auth = no in global in smb.conf, and try ldapsearch -D "cn=myuser,cn=Users,dc=company,dc=local" -x -w "<password>" \ -h 10.128.1.254 -b "cn=Users,dc=company,dc=local"


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Generate a short random password and throw it away. File encryption programs already use something very similar to a proof-of-work function: a KDF. When you provide a password it is never used raw as the key, but fed through (at the very least) a hash function, and modern encryption tools use "key derivation functions" that are designed to be ...


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The email client you'd like to use needs to be able to speak you provider's encryption. If we're simply talking GPG encryption, that's easy. For (as you mentioned them) Protonmail, you'll need said Proton Bridge to make your client encryption aware (or rather: agnostic). It all depends on the service you'd like to use and what their on-top security tool/...


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This is a somewhat known bug and has a fix in the not yet published version v0.16.0 of the rnp library that is used by thunderbird. I managed to import the key by Building rnp myself according to https://github.com/rnpgp/rnp/blob/master/docs/installation.adoc Using rnpkeys --import <input-file.asc> to import the broken export file and to show the key ...


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For Windows XP, several tools exist for decrypting WannaCry encrypted files. The requirements for success vary according to your setup and the XP service-pack version. Here are the tools that I found: Trend Micro Ransomware File Decryptor Wannakey wanakiwi Note carefully the conditions of each tool for successfully decrypting the files.


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-in expects a filename and you're passing the encoded cypher text. Put the cypher text into a file input: MpTF1+cqa23PdxQ6EoG9E77jfRJGYjORc4omawTg/g8jtUDZNNEeEr3waadTSLjQAfmJO94fpaA145yanoU9khrzCd/nAGIIAVwMC67UnsX+XY6dOEZMo41Z0dU1n42rUtkdXgldHXR1SQXaeDyjRnMj/mMMreNdykl8b4vNVPk= and then try: openssl rsautl -decrypt -in input -out plaintext -inkey private....


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Using 7z l -slt archiveName.zip | less I found that zip on Ubuntu uses Method = ZipCrypto Deflate for encryption. I don't pretend to posses any knowledge about which algorithms are considered theoretically secure at the time of writing, though as per this googled paper (cited here too) and the references therein, ZipCrypto is broken, while ZipCrypto ...


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In the case of PKI, the passphrase is the key used for symmetric encryption of the private key. You can relatively securely store encrypted private keys on a disk\removable (if your passphrase is hard to brute force). There are also applications like ssh-agent or gpg-agent which asks for the passphrase once and store the key in unencrypted form in memory for ...


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It's two different folders that are similar in name - Gpg4win vs. GnuPG. The first path is: C:\Program Files (x86)\Gpg4win\bin The second path, where gpg.exe is located, is: C:\Program Files (x86)\GnuPG\bin I didn't notice this at first myself when trying to find gpg.exe.


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I turns out that the problem was just that mkswap had changed the UUID of the swap file. I found the old UUID with: cat /etc/initramfs-tools/conf.d/resume RESUME=UUID=5caa6a65-ce03-4da5-aac2-9a9686c934d7 And then redid the mkswap command, forcing the original uuid: swapoff -a mkswap --uuid 5caa6a65-ce03-4da5-aac2-9a9686c934d7 /dev/mapper/dell--mini--vg-...


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Another way is to only disable the caching for symmetric encryption/decryption (that don't use public/private keypair). You can do this either with a command line option every time: gpg --no-symkey-cache -c input.txt gpg --no-symkey-cache -d output.gpg Or you can add no-symkey-cache to ~/.gnupg/gpg.conf, then you won't need to add to the command line every ...


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