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13

In the case that both hosts that have mutual connectivity... The blackbox must be a router if any of the following are true: The two hosts have IP addresses in different IP networks. A broadcast ping (ie: 255.255.255.255) from one host does not increment traffic counters on the other host. Either hosts' ARP table does not have an entry for the other ...


12

Neither ping -N nor arping worked for me, I finally settled with the solution from this answer: You can use the tool nping from the nmap package: # nping --icmp --dest-mac [gateway mac] [target ip] You can find your router's mac in your local ARP cache: $ arp -v [gateway ip] The tool also supports different ping types, like --tcp or --udp.


11

1.1.1.1 is contained in APNIC-LABS (1.1.1.0/24), a research network of APNIC Labs. It is reachable (with ping and the like) only when a test is performed. That doesn’t mean, however, that there’s no route to it. It’s a regular IP address, after all. Traceroute is very different from ping. Only in the last step will it actually contact the destination (1.1.1....


9

The default gateway is where packets are sent when there is no more specific route - actually the default gateway has a route matching all packets - a /0 netmask route. Try "netstat -rn" to see the routes on your system. The default gateway is not an interface on your system - it is usually your local router. It may be reachable via more than one ...


9

I finally figured out how to solve my problem! Yes, you first need to go into your VPN settings | Networking tab, then for both IPv4 and IPv6 properties, after clicking the Advanced button, make sure "Use default gateway on remote network" is unchecked. Then, however, you need to setup routing to the IPs that you wish to access through that VPN, or you won'...


7

ifconfig Will show the Interfaces, along with IP address. Normally, but not always eth0 will be the Interface you are looking for. To find the DNS cat /etc/resolv.conf To find the gateway route -n | grep "^0.0.0.0" | tr -s " " | cut -f2 -d" " What you are saying about "wanting to make the IP static" scares me a bit. It would be wrong to take the ...


7

What is 1.1.1.1? 1.1.1.1 is a public, assigned IP address; which is why you can traceroute to it. It was assigned to APNIC in 2010 (with the rest of the 1.0.0.0/8 block), and pretty useless as many folks treat it as a placeholder. See Shane Madden's answer over at Server Fault for more info, including the article about traffic linked there.


6

1.1.1.1 is used as the default address of the DHCP server on CISCO routers. However, on the public internet, 1.1.1.1 now belongs to Cloudflare DNS service. Whois record: inetnum: 1.1.1.0 - 1.1.1.255 netname: APNIC-LABS descr: APNIC and Cloudflare DNS Resolver project descr: Routed globally by AS13335/Cloudflare descr: ...


6

Here's what I'm using, assuming lan0 is connected to your internal network, and wan0 to your ISP. I'm not sure what you mean by "DHCP client on the upstream interface", since this is done with a DHCP client, not nftables. The setup below doesn't restrict outgoing traffic so the DHCP request will go through. #!/usr/bin/nft -f flush ruleset table inet ...


6

GVFS (the common network-fs library used by Nautilus and Nemo) creates its SFTP connections using the regular ssh tool as the transport. The ssh manual page says that -J is a shortcut for the ProxyJump option. You can specify this option permanently in ~/.ssh/config: Host ServerC ProxyJump gate


5

The default gateway should be reachable by only a single of your network interfaces. Having more than one NIC on the same subnet, and thus a potentially non deterministic output path might leads to unexpected and disappointing behavior. See for example https://serverfault.com/questions/415304/multiple-physical-interfaces-with-ips-on-the-same-subnet Should ...


4

pppd uses a default for "hisaddr" if it doesn't receive remote address info from the peer during IPCP. The address pppd uses is 0x0a404040 + unit where unit is the 0 in ppp0. That typically appears as 10.64.64.64. (The other default address you may see is 0xa707070 + unit = 10.112.112.112, used for dial-on-demand interfaces). I have seen this happen with ...


4

Most likely, this is the CPU fan. After a while the bearings that support the axle become worn out and the fan starts to make noise, until one day it will stop working. The reason the noise stops when Windows starts is that the speed of the fan rotation can be controlled and it reduces the speed once all the heavy lifting of booting is done and Windows runs. ...


4

First, let me answer your question directly: "gateway", in the sense you use here, means router. And a router handles (rougly) the layer 3 of the OSI model. What you're asking for is an HTTP proxy which actually operates on layer 4. In layman's therm: unless your gateway device is more capable than it typically would, you can't use it as a proxy server. ...


4

Boot to a recovery console and use diskpart. Just run the command diskpart lis vol sel vol # (select the volume number of the current C: partition [the old D:]) inactive sel vol # (select the current D: [old C:]) active Hopefully that will allow it to boot to the proper volume. There might be a problem with the volume D: [old C:] and may need to run a ...


4

Try running this from a Command Prompt: H:\> wmic bios list /format or H:\> wmic csproduct list /format. If the serial is kept in the BIOS it should list it with one of these. Otherwise, it could be on the motherboard, but you would have to physically check.


4

As stated by Daniel B in his answer, the 1.1.1.1 address is currently assigned to APNIC labs (as it was when the question has been asked). However, until January 2010, the 1.0.0.0/8 network block, of which 1.1.1.1 is part, was unassigned and therefore (ab)used for local use in several cases. Although the network block has been now assigned to APNIC (and ...


4

There's a web server on your consumer router - it makes it easier to configure things. It quite literally listens in on port 80 (usually only for IP ranges it serves) unless set otherwise. The modern consumer router is pretty much literally a small single board arm or mips PC running a linux or embedded OS suite with software running for a local web server,...


4

Since you refer to ipconfig, I presume you are on some version of Windows, so I shall offer a solution based on this assumption. Since your router is 192.168.1.254, then any IP addresses in your subnet will probably be in the range 192.168.1.1 to 192.168.1.254, so I would propose creating the following batch file, called for example OnLine.cmd:- @echo off ...


4

You don't need VPN, just NAT. Any home gateway router / wireless router with an Ethernet WAN port would work. NAT makes all your private LAN's traffic look like it's coming from a single IP address and MAC address.


4

You don't need a VPN Gateway, any home router that supports upstream (WAN) ethernet will do what you need. You just need to set it up to work in NAT mode then you can attach as many devices as you want on the LAN side, this can be either wired (most "home" routers have 3-5 LAN ports) or via WiFi (most home routers have built in WiFi access points).


4

Traceroute results correspond to whole routers, not their individual interfaces. Even though a router has multiple IP addresses on various interfaces, it will always produce only one trace reply. When doing so, the router will usually send that reply using an address from whichever interface the original request arrived through – in this case the LAN ...


3

Windows most centrally supports "Dead Gateway Detection", however all of the gateways CAN NOT be connected to disjointed networks. That means if I send send a packet to 198.252.206.16 (the ip of superuser.com) to any gateway on the list the packet must be able to get through. If any of the gateways are their own special private network's you can not use them ...


3

In CentOS 7 you can use nmcli d show to get the gateway and DNS addresses for all interfaces.


3

I had exactly the same problem as this but I got it to work without radically changing everything. All I did was add $SSH_ORIGINAL_COMMAND to the gateway authorized_keys to pass through anything down the the chain to the final server. So this: #/home/Alice/.ssh/authorized_keys command="ssh -t alice@web" ssh-rsa ABCD...E== alice@somehost Becomes: #/home/...


3

With two routes of equal metrics, a round-robin load-balancing scheme is used. This may be on a per-network basis, or it may be on a per-packet basis. Cisco (not linksys) routers can be configured to do either, but per-packet gives a better distribution equivalent links. Host-wise, I believe unless you're running a routing daemon, like routed or gated, the ...


3

The answer is no. In order to use it as a router the device has to have an "incoming" ethernet port. This is where you would plug the Ethernet cable from the Comcast modem and that interface would be assigned the public IP. Since there is no photo of the back I am going to use my own device that looks similar and it has no ethernet port - it is because the ...


3

Given only two hosts: A hub or unmanaged switch will be mostly invisible. A managed switch and a router will have a MAC address on the interface. If it is an IP network, these devices will appear as a "hop" in a Traceroute. From the MAC, you can get some information about the manufacturer I'm not sure what you mean by "gateway." My understanding is that a ...


3

I'm assuming that "router or gateway" is a single term. They really mean the same thing. you can look at the blackbox and unplug wires from it Hubs will: Have multiple ports Have a collision LED Not be gigabit (there aren't any such thing as gigabit hubs) Replicate traffic that comes in on one port to all other ports, on a Layer 2 basis. Switches will: ...


3

I found the answer in Juniper facebook page. These setting are for SSH and Telnet. And they don't work in http. Just this!


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