59

You need a HDMI-to-VGA adapter. Your laptop is outputting an HDMI signal which has to be converted to VGA. Some connectors are physically different, but use identical signaling - in these cases a passive adapter is sufficient. Passive means there's no signal transformation necessary. It's just two different connectors wired together. For example, DVI-A is ...


26

Many people get this the wrong way round. Signals go from > to You might think you're connecting your display to your computer, but you're not. You're connecting the computer to the display. This means your signal goes from the computer to the display - that's an HDMI to VGA connection. HDMI is a digital format, VGA is an analog format, so any connector ...


17

I also kept receiving that popup. I do not have any VM running but I do have WSL2 running, which it does on top of Hyper-V (plus Docker using WSL2, I do not know if this plays a role in it). Here is what I did : Get the name of the video card. Here I could see that the driver was enabled. Get-VMRemoteFXPhysicalVideoAdapter Disable RemoteFX adapter. ...


17

If you don’t like the blocky, rasterized graphics you are seeing when attempting to play Doom in DOSBox, the better alternative is to use a native OS interpreter of the Doom engine such as GZDoom; a newer and maintained GNU licnesed version of ZDoom. These modern Doom engines use the vector graphics capabilities of modern systems. As they describe on their ...


12

After reading @Mickael's answer, this worked for me (at an Admin Powershell prompt): Get-VMRemoteFXPhysicalVideoAdapter | ?{$_.Enabled} | Disable-VMRemoteFXPhysicalVideoAdapter


9

I'll go through your Q point by point. Do I need (hdmi to vga adapter) OR (vga to hdmi adapter)? My common sense would tell (vga to hdmi adapter), but I am not 100% sure. Well, the exact naming of the adapter will depend on the vendor, but most vendors put the video source (computer) before the "to", and the video target (monitor) behind it. So &...


8

I did a significant amount of research on my own, as well as learning a lot about basic electrical concepts to figure out the answer to my question. First off, I am not an electrician and my answer here certainly doesn't meet any professional or legal standards. This question can be broadly broken down into 3 parts: the power source (PSU), the power transfer ...


5

If you look at the products carefully, you'll notice two really important things: Desktop graphics cards (by volume and weight) are primarily made up of their cooling solution... The fans, metalwork and shoruds are all in an effort to get heat away from the various components - mainly the GPU die itself, RAM and power supplies. The shroud serves a secondary ...


5

On recent versions of windows - I did this with 2H20, but I'm pretty sure that you can do it on other versions, windows will automatically run applications based on what is the "best" GPU. I found that if an application is on a monitor on a specific GPU, it will preferencially run on that. I also found out, with a little research that you can ...


4

Running this command made the trick for me: sudo prime-select nvidia Source: https://forums.linuxmint.com/viewtopic.php?t=294384


4

Silicon is prone to defects which means that areas of circuitry sometimes does not work as intended. Either they don't work well at high speeds, in which case a manufacturer will clock them down, or entire sections will simply not work at all. GPUs though have an upside. They are essentially a large set of repeated circuits and a failure in one set does not ...


3

Indeed many PSUs are able to deliver over 150 W to a single 8-pin connector. Some are even designed with just a single 12V rail (or can be configured to a single-rail mode in case of Corsair), meaning that they can support their full 12V load on any single cable. The limitation is actually in the connector and cabling. An 8-pin is rated for 150 W and a 6-pin ...


3

This seems like a known bug: #7562 open defect using -hwaccel nvdec produces 'No decoder surfaces left' with interlaced input and 3 or more b-frames. The proposed workarounds in this post were: Add the parameter -extra_hw_frames 3 Use the filter scale_cuda or yadif_cuda.


3

Because the Intel HD Graphics 2000 iGPU does not, in fact, support DirectX 11. According to TechPowerUp, it supports DirectX Feature Level 10_1. It is much too slow for Far Cry 3 anyway.


2

Mac and Windows computers have two different display modes connected to an external display: Mirror and Extend. In Mirror Mode, the computer monitor duplicates the monitor on the external display so that you see the same picture on both the desktop and projector. In Extend Mode, the external display is treated as a separate screen so that you can have ...


2

I think a very key point has been missed by the OP. GPU fans typically pull air INTO the GPU, not blow it away! The fans are designed to be pulling the coldest air INTO the GPU to actively cool it. The coldest air is at the bottom of your case. See image: GPU fan orientation So the air IS going in the direction you're describing, its routing the air up ...


2

A 1600W PSU should make no difference compared to a 1000W PSU of identical quality. A 1600W PSU may have a different efficiency curve compared to a 1000W PSU, possibly resulting in one or the other running warmer, and will be able to deliver far more power if so required. What it will not do is force current on the devices that use power unless the PSU is ...


2

It's almost certainly PCI-e 1.x. If it had PCI-e 2.0 support, they'd advertise it (like they do with extra SATA2 chip on this motherboard) PCI-e 2.0 spec was released in 2007 and the motherboard is a 2008 model. Considering that we're just getting PCI-e 4.0 support in 2020 while it was released in 2017, I think it would be unlikely to see PCI-e 2.0 in ...


2

I can confirm that the 3000 series, and presumably older RTX and GTX cards still have cuda cores, in addition to tensor and RT cores. You can check the CUDA core count from the nvidia control panel, under system information The RTX 3080 for example has 8704 CUDA cores listed If you don't have the exact card on hand, there's lists you can use to look it up. ...


2

Yes you're becoming too greedy. GZDoom is as good as it's going to get, because those textures and sprites were made as you said nearly 30 years ago. They were not made to take advantage of future graphics features, they were a very very small company back then. The only other thing you could look for us a high res textures pwad file to supplement them. But ...


2

I upgraded my HP laptop storage by adding SSD and was reformatted. So all of your drivers (except BIOS) need to be properly re-installed again. Get the HP Driver Update Assistant App (HP Support Site), download it, install it and run it to identify drivers that need to be updated. Complete the update, restart and test.


2

It's absolutely possible, but to answer your question, it is a bad idea. The better idea is to just get a single PSU that will support all your devices. Having to "rig" your rig to use dual PSUs would require additional parts that can affect performance, make things untidy, and possibly even damage your hardware.


2

You can use the context menu option too for Nvidia. And then here,


2

It certainly does look like a driver issue, when the Windows operating system initializes, it downloads compatible drivers from Windows Update, the drivers are generic so they are not tailored to individual devices, they are not "best match" drivers by design to be compatible to more devices, such a driver can cause the problem you described here. ...


2

The FCC logo says MicroStar MS-V328, which is an MSI nVidia GeForce GTX1060 OC


2

It would appear the solution was easy, however I didn't suspect such a thing because it never happened before. When I realized my players were using the Integrated GPU rather than my Nvidia 1060 card for decoding the video, I tried the change this through Nvidia Control Panel / Manage 3D Settings, I saw the option to select the video card was grayed out (...


2

Have you tried any other devices or computers with your monitor and TV? Have you tried your computer at any other place? Problem looks and feels odd, like monitor/TV failure or GPU failure. But since you have changed GPU and tried with different displays those should be OK. You have tried different cables as well. Another thing to look into is overclocking. ...


2

According to the Video Encode and Decode GPU Support Matrix, your GPU supports hardware-assisted decode and encode, also called NVENC. The only troubling point here is the list of codecs that your GPU supports, which are: H.264 and H.265. If your videos are not encoded with these codecs, hardware acceleration might not work for you. For the right codecs and ...


2

Check this diagram: https://linustechtips.com/uploads/monthly_2018_09/received_267234090662801.jpeg.07c6ba70df9381b6cbdcd16bac5e7551.jpeg Although 6 pin fits 4 pin connector, the power (+12V) and ground lines are opposite. Basically you have short circuited your PSU. You can try replacing PSU and see if your hardware still working, but there is no sure ...


2

This is quite common. Two of the outputs are ganged - they are not distinct outputs, but shared. If you're not trying to use all four ports, you should be able to use one of the other DP ports simultaneously with the HDMI. You'd need to check the manufacturer's site for further information [this is often quite well buried]. Note NVidia is not the ...


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