New answers tagged

1

Most filesystems have their own "size" independent of the underlying device (partition). It seems a bit like Reflect simply dumped the original filesystem into a larger partition, but did not update any NTFS structures to match. From within Windows, you can probably fix this via DISKPART. Select the volume using list vol and select vol num, then ...


0

I understand you need a portable disk that may be connected to multiple computers, but that you wish at least part of it to be protected with a password across all devices. The best utility for this task is VeraCrypt. It might be better to use for the VeraCrypt data an encrypted file on the disk, that can be mounted by VeraCrypt as a volume, rather than ...


1

There is probably no such thing that actually works well. Password protection can be done at hardware level (that is, enforced by the disk's firmware) – e.g. most SATA HDDs can have an "ATA password" applied – but neither Windows nor Linux know how to deal with it. You will not get a password prompt when connecting an "ATA password" ...


1

What you are asking is not possible in the general sense. You can't password protect a partition. If you are password protecting a directory this would be filesystem specific, and none of the common filesystem's that work on both OS,'s support this. Veracrypt ( a variant of Truecrypt) can be used on both platforms, but will require additional software. You ...


0

I confirm the words of Jus12, it is indeed a problem with Window 7. I have a Seagate Backup plus 4TB and on Window 7 this disk passes the generic long test but not the generic short test (always fails during the begining of internal analysis). I tested the same disc with the same version of seatoool (v1.4.0.7) on windows XP and the generic short test was a ...


7

Rufus author here. First of all, the proper channel to report issues is the official issue tracker. I'm afraid however that there is not much I can do for you. I literally went out of my way to ensure that large disks are not listed by default in Rufus and that, if you do want to have those listed, you must forcibly enable the hidden "List USB Hard ...


2

When I change drive letters will it effectively trick BIOS? Or will BIOS track this change, and change its boot sequence to match? No. Neither. The BIOS does not know what a drive letter is – it's a completely Windows-specific concept and is not actually reported to the firmware nor even to the drive itself. (It is only stored in the Windows Registry.) ...


0

Boot the USB again using rufus. it need to download some extra files and choose the default option when it shows you options of booting.


20

Moving large files around on the same partition (i.e. drive letter in Windows), which is indicated by the fast times, does not actually move the file location on disk. Filesystems have (generally near the beginning of the disk/partition) an index of where files are and often how they appear in a tree. When you move a file within the same volume it simply ...


0

I've made a linkage to Microsoft account and it work's nicely. I can not make a screenshot right now from that PC but it's linked. According to docs it must work on new PC with same account. According to this instruction. Furthermore, I've just tested my MS account and found interesting fact. I've recently upgraded my PC. I've changed CPU, RAM count and ...


0

License is typically locked to either CPU/Bios, HDD (serial number) or NIC Mac address. Hard to say if you can choose which it uses. You can try emailing MS Support and see if they can lock as needed. If it's a purchased license, you should be able to reinstall using the Install key.


0

It was the power management. I finally found someone else who had the same problem and tracked it down to a power management issue in the Bluetooth driver. Basically, if the Bluetooth module is shut down to save power, as soon as it powers on again it will emit a short sound mid-way between a buzz and a beep. Dell blames it on piezoelectricity. Some Dells do ...


1

If the disk is making noises then DON'T TURN IT ON. You are perhaps just continuing on scratching the disk surface and making less likely the successful recovery of the data. Send the disk to a professional recovery specialist that can treat each disk platter and recover its data. Be prepared for a large bill, so better do some market research.


1

Given that eSATA is electrically identical to SATA, you can just purchase a cable to connect this board to an eSATA port on your PC or NAS. However, be aware that many common controllers do not support port multipliers. For this reason, it is quite unlikely that a cheap USB to SATA adapter will function correctly with this device, and even if you connect ...


1

You need a SATA controller to drive a port multiplier it can't work "standalone". You can get SATA to eSATA cables. USB is more generic than SATA, so there is such a thing as USB to SATA adapters, but there is no such thing as a SATA to USB adapter.


0

Windows uses the C: drive for many large folders and files, such WinSxS, User data, pagefile,sys swapfile.sys and hiberfil.sys. In addition, it is also the default drive for User and for Common Documents, Downloads, Music, Pictures, and Videos, and for Program Files and Program Files (x86). Some of these can be changed by the user, and tools such as Nirsoft'...


0

I had the same idea for storing PC Games in a VHD container , not in ISO. its okay idea, go for it. There is not risk here, just check Read Only on VHD or VHDX , just in case your antivirus deletes some crack, keygen etc. , when you mount them. Good Luck,


0

The simple answer is that it's (mostly, see below) the same as covering an entire printed page with correction fluid, you're just replacing the information that's there with blank space. The exact pattern technically does not matter in most cases, as any overwrite of a byte on a storage device will replace what's stored there. For traditional hard-drives ...


2

What exactly is happening when I write zeroes to a disk that purges it of data? You are overwriting data with those zeros. A HDD is basically a sequence of bits. A single bit can hold either a single 0 or a single 1. These bits are used to store data. Each disk has a fixed number of them. The more bits there are, the larger the disk and more data can be ...


2

Any pattern is as good as the zeroes. There is nothing special about zeroes. The idea is to set every bit on the disk, not only allocated sectors, because unallocated (but used previously) sectors can still have left-over data in them. Zero is just the easiest constant to write, just one character - 0, but 1 to 9 would all be equally good (but perhaps ...


0

The solution to my problem was to use Cygwin. I realized that in Cygwin, I can use the Unix find command to operate on all directories in the filesystem and execute Windows commands on those folders. Cygwin's find has the unique capability to use Unix or Windows commands in the -exec parameter. This does not work on WSL, as far as I know. From my own testing,...


0

You could try these steps: Temporarily Disable Windows Search Open CMD in admin mode Run net.exe stop "Windows search" Check if the disk usage have improved if so you should disable Windows search for good. You do that by opening Windows services -> locate "Windows Search" service - Right click it and go into properties -> On &...


0

Sometimes the Windows auto-update mechanism uses lots of disk bandwidth in the background while it's working on installing the next update. Check in the settings/resource monitor to see if this is the case.


0

None of the methods I've seen online worked with my amd x570 setup. Partly because none explain how to know which driver is being used; and thus which registry key needs attention. So here we go for Windows 10: In Device Manager expand either: IDE ATA/ATAPI controllers Storage Controllers Here you can open the Properties -> Events tab for whichever ...


0

I had to replace the existing connection cables first, they were SATA 2 only. If your cables have no locks to prevent accidental unplugging, you might have the same issue.


1

I renamed the Windows folder to Windows.old on the old drive. This is not a correct process. Windows.old contains a complete installation to rebuild the computer if need be. It is created by Windows 10 when doing a feature upgrade. Windows.old is NOT the Windows folder renamed, and this is why Disk Cleanup did not see it and remove it.


0

NTFS support on the Mac is patchy and problematic, since always. You would do better to use a Windows virtual machine to read the NTFS disk. For example, you may download evaluation versions of Windows VM from Microsoft's Get a Windows 10 development environment.


0

At a certain stage the state may plausibly be such that the prior damage has mechanically damaged the surface of the disk, i.e. material has come lose and is spreading inside the box, causing new damage. There is no way to recover from this state; scrap the disk.


1

The total amount of bad sectors (reallocated, pending, and uncorrectable sectors) is 1148, which comes out to 574 MB [...] I assume that it reports the bad sectors as used up, but that value is much smaller than I'd expect. Your calculations are off by a thousand. Since a sector is 512 bytes, the total is actually 574 kB or about half a megabyte. (Although ...


-1

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Disk_sector If a sector is defined as the intersection between a radius and a track, as was the case with early hard drives and most floppy disks, the sectors towards the outside of the disk are physically longer than those nearer the spindle. Because each sector still contains the same number of bytes, the outer sectors have ...


2

Yes, your drive is failing (SMART result notwithstanding). Take a backup, then buy a replacement disk.


0

Just to mention: robocopy is much fater than "regular" windows copying. And copying a lot of small files will also be slower than copying large files. Regarding your copy speeds always being about the same, even when swapping hardware, makes me think it might be a Windows issue - what's your Windows version? It could also be that some program, or a ...


3

Small files (like source files) will often present very poor filesystem performance, which is especially noticable when you have many of them to shift... Regarding the lumpy graph, I'd suggest that the higher transfer speeds (peaks) represent files that are significantly larger, and are thus able to achieve a much higher transfer rate as they can be handled ...


-1

What you are looking for is an "IDE to SATA converter". They can be found for around $15 to $20. Just Google it and you find plenty of suppliers. Please note: Due to the size of the converter it may not physically fit in your dock. These things are designed to make an old IDE drive mounted in a PC case work with modern SATA only motherboard. The ...


0

If the RAM is defective, the machine probably will not start. The message you get says the System Drive is defective and getting more defective as you keep using it. You need to replace the drive in this case.


1

Connect it back to the Raspberry Pi and delete the directory using rmdir from within Linux.


0

I want to suggest the following software that can isolate bad sectors: Repartition Bad Drive: Repartition Bad Drive is a free utility from Abstradrome which is intended to isolate unrecoverable bad sectors from partitions. If HDD Regenerator reports that bad sectors cannot be regenerated, then the hard drive contains unrecoverable bad sectors. Partition Bad ...


0

If you remembered clicking noises as described by Andrew Morton above, do not use the drive and contact a recovery company directly. If not do the following: I don't know what type of connection "Bridge" should mean. Use a docking station to connect that drive to another computer to see if it appears (Windows: Disc Management, in linux use "...


1

Everything with mechanical moving parts will wear down over time, and the start-up is the time when the HDD motor will have the greatest load. In server use, you have HDDs that may have been warm & spinning continuously for years. When such a HDD stops and cools down, there is an elevated risk for latent hardware failures to become actual failures: ...


1

This was quite the adventure! I'll try to break down my process here so it's a little easier to read than the comment thread above on the question. Step 1: Figure out the drive number of the raw disk you want to use Two ways: Open "Disk Management", make note of the Disk # in the volume name column that represents the physical disk you want to use ...


3

This is a standard USB A to mini B cable. Something like this would work fine.


1

Before opening your encrypted disk you will have to make it reappear. The encryption process is just reading and writing encrypted sectors and does not cause your drive to disappear. Your description suggests a hardware failure during that process. This is your first problem. You should connect your drive to other machines if it does not appear there as well....


1

Drive letters are a very different thing from filesystem labels. Graphical interface: Run diskmgmt.msc, right-click the volume and select "Change drive letters and paths". Command line: Run diskpart, select the disk and partition, then use the assign command.


0

When installing a program you are asked where you want to install it, and you can just choose a different drive. Simply moving installed programs with copy-paste or various tools is not recommended and will cause them to malfunction or stop working. Possible working solutions if you want to keep using C drive would be: uninstall programs and games and then ...


0

One reason could be that the SSD has some read errors which causes the OS to freeze. Make sure the SATA cable is well connected, you can also try another cable. This has happened to me and it proved to be a defective SATA cable (or perhaps one of the connectors).


0

It seems like it would be possible to have both on one drive in separate partitions (see this HTG link and this Reddit post). The main thing I would worry about is your storage. 32 gigs aren't much. Windows 8 is around 13 gigs alone. Say the Linux distro was Ubuntu. Ubuntu isn't nearly as big as Windows, but it'll get bigger over time. Depending on what you'...


0

Yes, it is recoverable This is definitely a tough situation because as you know with dynamic disks in a spanned volume, this combines the disk space available in two or more hard disks to create a dynamic volume. In a way, the data is "cut in half" in both hard drives and typically when one drive fails (or in this case is cleaned), the data is gone ...


0

I'm using a Linux host and Windows 10 guest. My problem is that the Windows physical drive changes on every boot - it's ranged from /dev/sdc to /dev/sdm. My solution was to create a script thats runs on startup. It detects the drive with the WIN10 label, and then uses sed to replace the device in the .vmdk file to the current drive device. #!/bin/bash ...


0

The logic board is probably going bad or the sata port on the drive is bad. Esp. if you swapped the cables and it's not showing up in the bios, unfortunately I've had a couple of drives like that too. If you have another pc you can test it on to see if it shows up, that would be a good start. Other than below, you might want to look up the model and ensure ...


0

Rest assured your data isn't gone, just inaccessible. You've (or rather Microsoft) hosed your boot sector/record on 2nd HDD. Windows aggressively takes over that so it's best suggested to install Windows THEN Linux. Complicating things is you want 3 OS's so booting IS going to be complex & I'd suggest against it based on how you worded your question. It'...


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