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The NAT doesn't handle them. There is no way for someone outside to choose which device they want to reach; they only can reach the router itself (because it has the public address) and that's really it. That's why you usually have to add "port forwarding" rules on your router – you have to tell it how you want it to rewrite the incoming packets. ...


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You may create batch files (.bat) to disable one network adapter and enable another. You may create on the desktop shortcuts to these files, define them to be run as Administrator, and even assign them a hotkey. To prepare, run the Command Prompt as administrator and list all the network interfaces using the following command: netsh interface show interface ...


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Hope this points you in the right direction. When you are on you home network you don't need port forwarding. Depending on the firewall you use. You can do redirect that just redirects the traffic to the server or just have a internal DNS that gives out the internal LAN IP of the server. I have never gotten the redirection to work correctly. Some ...


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My guess is your WAN and LAN are on the same subnet. That defeats the purpose of a firewall/router, and no need to have pfsense in use at all. Your WAN and LAN MUST be on separate networks. pfsense can see the 'internet' though you seem to also be doing this as a lab test, with you WAN connected to your internal firewalled network. Try setting LAN to 192....


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The complicated solution is to configure routing tables in all the computers. The simple solution is to have everybody on the same network. The only problem with that is the DHCP allocation of IP addresses, where you can: Let the ISP router do DHCP; disable this function on the other router and the switch Configure multiple DHCP servers with a distinct ...


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