Hot answers tagged

56

You're confusing megabits and megabytes Your line is 37 megabits/s Mbps Your measured download is 4.6 megabytes/s MBps 37mbps = 4.625MBps so you are getting what you pay for. See https://www.gbmb.org/mbps-to-mbs


52

If the frame-busting code on Stack Exchange sites is working for you, then you could write a userscript to insert frame-busting code on every site. If you've never made a userscript before, here are some resources to get started: http://www.chromium.org/developers/design-documents/user-scripts http://www.webmonkey.com/2010/02/get_started_with_greasemonkey/ ...


38

Vote with your wallet and don't use ISP that does this garbage. If that's not possible, your next best bet would be to hide all the traffic from your ISP so that they can't see inside and consequently modify it. You can accomplish this by encrypting all/as much as possible of your traffic. You can do that with browser addons like HTTPS Everywhere. It has a ...


38

Yes, Modern routers in their firmware have a setting to support CWMP (Customer-Premises Equipment WAN Management Protocol) for remote management. This is also called TR-069 by its name on Technical Report 069 as it first introduced. This capability is also called zero-touch configuration and most providers are now using for remote-configure your ...


37

First, yes, your ISP can block your computer. Can they do it permanently and perfectly? ... probably not, but they can make it hard enough that you don't bother doing it and find another solution. That's not the real question though. The real question is: "Did your ISP block your connection to their network?" I suspect, unless they believe they have a ...


36

The VPN encrypts your traffic, but the amount of information that is sent and received will stay the same. This is not affected by the fact that you are on a mobile connection. Depending on the encryption protocol that is used, it might even increase your data usage, but only by a (very) small margin. In short: No, a VPN can never hide your data throughput,...


32

Illegal in this case means a format not recognised by the router. The router checks the image file before installing it and it found it contains a format it does not recognise. Reasons for this can be: the image is meant for a different type of router or a newer version of your router the image is corrupt the image is compressed If the image is ...


28

Comcast Xfinity, like all ISPs that are also cable TV providers, uses DOCSIS. Most likely version 3.0. DOCSIS defines both layer 1 and 2. It defines the physical layer as RF signals between 5MHz and 1GHz over 75ohm coaxial cable at certain power levels, and channelized into 6MHz channels (for North America and other NTSC/ATSC TV markets) or 8MHz channels (...


27

DarthCaniac wrote that "Servers don't connect directly to the internet", which ironically enough is actually both right and wrong at the same time. Your home network (either your PC, or your NAT router which provides connectivity to your other devices) is connected as directly to the Internet as most servers. Remember that the Internet is a network of ...


25

Not 100% sure but TR-069 might be the standard involved that is allowing your ISP to access your CPE (modem/router) and get information from it. Probably all DSL modems you buy and certainly any you get from the ISP will be TR-069 enabled. I have cable (DOCSIS) and bought my own modem, without a built in router, and then bought a separate router. This is ...


23

Most modern ISPs (last 13 years or so) will not accept traffic from a customer connection unless it has a source IP address that they would route to that customer were it the destination IP address. This is called "reverse path forwarding". See BCP 38. ISPs either do not use dynamic routing protocols with their customer connections or filter the routes they ...


19

You can monitor connection quality over time with SmokePing. In a single graph you get round-trip time, jitter and packet loss. Excellent to monitor links.


18

Try: dig whoami.akamai.net will tell you the IP of the ISP's nameserver. The akamai.net nameservers are running custom code, and respond to this name with the address of the client that made the DNS request. Note that this may not tell you the address that your router is sending to. The nameserver may have multiple IPs -- often they're in clusters, and ...


17

Well, as DavidPostill said 26 mins ago, your ISP is using NAT on their routers before enrouting your traffic to the internet. This means that basically, you and other clients inside your ISP are in a big Metropolitan Area Network (MAN), The same way your home router is creating a Local Area Network (LAN) but in a bigger scale. Why would your ISP do this? ...


17

I'll focus on this comment you made: tracking someone to their doorstep by their IP address is a myth No, not a myth at all. In most cases, especially for wired connections, each Internet connection (your DSL, cable or fibre connection) will have one distinct IP address. It may be fixed (you get assigned an IP address when your connection is first set up), ...


16

If your ISP is doing this by injecting JavaScript sourced from a specific domain, you could use a JavaScript blacklist extension to avoid running any JavaScript from that domain. (One of the public hotspots I connect to uses this approach.) However, if your ISP injects the entire script directly, then I don't think this will work. Chrome: JavaScript ...


15

Besides the frame busting trick, I would suggest getting the IPs of the servers that serve the framed pages and block them. If you are using China Telecom like me, they don't always frame the pages and, when they do so, a simple reload will give you the un-framed page. I guess they cannot frame everything since hijacking millions of connections per minute ...


15

Is there any way to bypass this restriction? No you can’t. Regardless of whether you change DNS, use TOR or another virtual private network (VPN), the first “hop” in your Internet connection will always be a connection controlled by your Internet service provider (ISP). And if they are cutting you off, they are cutting you off. Your account with the ISP ...


14

Can ISP's DNS server go down and if so, why don't they know about it? - Like everything else, they can go down. Why didn't they know about it? - It could be that the tech you talked to: A. Was not experienced enough to understand the problem. B. Understood and was aware of the problem but was pushing you off for some reason. Also are they able to reset ...


13

No. Neither the Windows firewall nor a competent router's firewall is "all or nothing". Home users are generally expected to set the Windows Firewall to the Private profile when they are connected to their home network The "Private" mode doesn't actually allow all connections from everywhere: most of the default rules are limited to "This subnet" only, ...


12

What does "connected to the Internet" really mean anyway? It really means "has a route available to send packets to all or virtually all devices on the Internet and a corresponding route to get replies back". To do that, ISPs and other large networks interconnect with each other. There are two main types of interconnections, "peering" and "transit" (and a ...


11

PPTP can be blocked by ISPs because it (1) runs exclusively on port 1723 and (2) uses non-standard GRE packets which are easily identifiable. See PPTP on Wikipedia. The solution is using OpenVPN protocol instead of PPTP. Here's a tutorial by BestVPN that covers setting up OpenVPN on a linux VPS. There are increasing degrees of obfuscation that can make ...


11

Yes. Even if you're visiting websites with HTTPS, your ISP knows which website you're visiting. We can try to hide what we are sending back and forth but the destination you're visiting is always available to your ISP.


11

This doesn't sound like an ISP issue, it sounds like the dormitory may have implemented 802.1X authentication on their Ethernet. If so, your laptop needs to have the proper profile installed so that it can connect to the LAN. We used this mechanism at a company I worked for, so that visitors couldn't connect their laptops to our internal network (I think ...


10

This will take a lot of time but will get you the list of all blocked ports: #!/bin/bash COUNTER=1 while [ $COUNTER -lt 65535 ]; do echo $COUNTER curl portquiz.net:$COUNTER --connect-timeout 1 let COUNTER=COUNTER+1 done


10

The modem you have allows remote management via TR-069, which could allow access to the information mentioned.


9

You are paying for the Internet Service that your Internet Service Provider provides. That is, all data traffic that passes through their routers. They pay to keep all their hardware running, lease the physical connection to your house (or similar for GPRS/wireless/satellite links), and pay for all the data you send and receive to other machines in the ...


9

The first thing to make clear when asking "is ABC safe?" is to define your threat model. In this case, you have (and kudos for that): your threat model is your ISP being malicious and wanting to look at your (outgoing, presumably, since you ask about their SMTP server) e-mails. Against such a threat model, using the ISP's mail server does indeed present ...


9

First check your router firmware version and the downloaded version, sometimes you can't UPDATE to the newest firmware, you must look if they recommend an old version before the newest one. If that router from ISP, it mean's they locked your router. you have three options to flash it with other version. First method By using SSH commands most ISP left ...


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