29

Yes; but first fix your buggy program before fiddling with systemd. MariusMatutiae is quite correct. You have a problem with your program. It deadlocks. Fiddling with systemd isn't the answer. At best, it's a distraction. Fix your program so that it isn't broken. Direct your energies at the right thing. That said, other people are going to come ...


19

Turns out Sysinternals' Process Explorer can do this (of course it can, there's nothing it can't do, apparently!).


14

Usage as below from same folder: To check packer per interface: ./netpps.sh eth0 To check speed per interface: ./netspeed.sh eth0 Measure Packets per Second on an Interface netpps.sh as file name #!/bin/bash INTERVAL="1" # update interval in seconds if [ -z "$1" ]; then echo echo usage: $0 [network-interface] echo echo ...


12

Update: There's now an official blackbox exporter https://github.com/prometheus/blackbox_exporter There's an blackbox prober for Prometheus that'll let you do this: https://github.com/discordianfish/blackbox_prober Prometheus is mainly focused on whitebox rather than blackbox monitoring, but over time it's likely this functionality will be added as a core ...


12

I read about tools like Nagios, but I guess that’s a bit overkill for my situation. Does anybody know how I can get started? Easy. Look into setting up monitoring configurations with Monit. It’s a lightweight and easy to setup system monitoring tool that is very useful to setup in scenarios exactly as you describe; service goes down, restart it and ...


10

The Clipboard API dates from Windows 3.0 (or before?) and is badly designed. Unfortunately, instead of having get/set primitives, it uses open/close, which makes it possible for applications to hold its access for far too long. Some improvement was brought by Vista to the handling of the viewers chain, but no new API. With the existing API, it is possible ...


10

You probably want to use the "mmc" utility from mmc-utils (https://packages.debian.org/stretch/mmc-utils). I have, however, not yet seen a write and/or bad block counter. # mmc extcsd read /dev/mmcblk1 ============================================= Extended CSD rev 1.7 (MMC 5.0) ============================================= Card Supported Command sets [...


8

I have created a simple utility for this purpose: https://github.com/benblamey/when_changed usage: when_changed (file path) (command) (optional-parameters) e.g. when_changed C:\somedir\foo.txt myapp.exe bar wibble 123


8

Process Hacker, the open source alternative to Process Explorer, also shows the GPU usage. Press CTRL+I to get the system information Window and click on the GPU Tab, so get a graph with the GPU usage.


8

The Nagios docs explain this setting as: This directive determines whether or not checks for the service will be "obsessed" over using the ocsp_command. The ocsp_command is explained here. This is the "Obsessive Compulsive Service Processor Command." This option allows you to specify a command to be run after every service check, which ...


8

This is a very open ended question with no real answer. It depends on the type of monitoring being implemented. If they are looking over your shoulder, they may be doing so using software like SCCM or LANDesk.. While LANDesk has a system tray icon which glows white/yellow when you are being watched, SCCM doesn't but does have an optional "RDP" style bar ...


8

Above answer is right that mmc-utils is the way to go. The version in git (https://git.kernel.org/pub/scm/linux/kernel/git/cjb/mmc-utils.git/) reports DEVICE_LIFE_TIME_EST_TYP_{A,B}, where 1 is 0-10% reserved blocks used, 2 is 10-20%, etc. I presume the flash storage in question has to support this field before it can be reported.


7

Easiest to use and easiest to control output and redirect to file for continuous logging: ifstat Probably comes with most linux distributions, and can be installed with brew on mac


6

In Windows 7 there is the Performance Monitor. You must enable it, set the log options and then leave it running. It is only historical for as long as you run the application. The file is :C:\Windows\system32\perfmon.exe A link, provided by Scott below with a good tutorial / step by step instructions.


6

@Zoredache is correct. It's called a POST card and they have an LED display. The display shows the value that is written to port 0x80 (or possibly other ports, not sure if that's a standard). BIOSes write to this port as they progress through their startup sequence. If something causes the sequence to stop, the last written value can reveal why. Some ...


6

On unix system you can use inotify-tools, built on top of inotify kernel subsystem API. By inotifywait you can have live mode monitoring on standard output: inotifywait -m -r -e access -e modify -e create -e delete --format 'PATH:%w%f EVENTS:%,e' {{path_to_monitor}} Notes: -m: monitor indefinitely -r: recursive monitor -e: specify file system events to ...


6

Use Process Monitor Process Monitor is an advanced monitoring tool for Windows that shows real-time file system, Registry and process/thread activity. This tool monitoring network activity also.


5

A tool that works on Linux in similar way as the Sysinternals software can be found here: http://temasoft.com/products/filemonitor. It is an agent based, real-time file monitor for both Windows and Linux that can give you relevant details about various file operations, including the user name and process. Note: I work for the company which develops this ...


5

Kind of late to the discussion but if you have one of *WRT firmware variants running on your router, my (free) usage monitoring add-on called YAMon (short for Yet Another Monitor) shows what devices are connected to your network and how much data they are consuming, when. The data is aggregated by hour, day and month (within your ISP billing interval) and ...


5

The tool to use is Process Monitor: Start Process Monitor Set a filter if required, otherwise uncheck all defaults and click OK to trace all Enter menu Options > Profiling Events Click "Generate thread prof‌iling events", choose the frequency, and click OK To see the collected historical data at any time, enter menu Tools > Process Activity Summary... Sort ...


5

Credit goes to Steve @ redhat who answered my question on the linux-audit mailing list: A watch is really a syscall rule in disguise. If you place a watch on a directory, auditctl will turn it into: -a exit,always -F dir=/home/raven/public_html -F perm=war -F key=raven-pubhtmlwatch The -F dir field is recursive. However, if you just want to watch ...


5

Use iptraf - http://www.linuxcommand.org/man_pages/iptraf8.html It's an ncurses based commandline utility which is able to give you statistics on all interfaces on the machine - including bandwidth usage.


5

I like to use OSSEC, it has many options: OSSEC watches it all, actively monitoring all aspects of Unix system activity with file integrity monitoring, log monitoring, rootcheck, and process monitoring. With OSSEC you won't be in the dark about what is happening to your valuable computer system assets. https://ossec.github.io/


5

You'd want to watch the process that STARTS the process, and not just the target process itself, most likely. Process Monitor by SysInternals should be able to capture this. Filter for the Visual Studio process (and possibly also for CMD and Chrome), trigger the debug sequence in VS, and see what is captured. Another option, also from SysInternals, would ...


5

Managed Ethernet switches often include a port mirroring (sometimes called port spanning) feature to allow all traffic to/from a given port to be mirrored to another port so you can hook up a packet sniffer to the second port and analyze everything that’s going on. I’ve even seen decently cheap ( <$100) 5- and 8-port managed switches with this feature. ...


5

One solution is to use a batch file with an infinite for loop to automatically restart the application if it closes. There are two possibilities here, depending on how the application is designed. If the application is launched and runs in the same process, you can use a very simple batch file: @echo off :Start C:\path\to\application.exe :: Wait 30 seconds ...


4

In OSX 10.9 simply use the built in Activity Monitor: http://support.apple.com/kb/HT5890?viewlocale=en_US&locale=en_US


4

Less visual https://diigo.com/0xcp0 for highlights from Brendan's blog » Top 10 DTrace scripts for Mac OS X (2011-10-10). More visual For more modern operating systems that are incompatible with fseventer, there's Apple Xcode Instruments – – powerful, but (compared to fseventer) in some cases, Instruments may be too heavyweight.


4

I answered the same question over here with a complete shell script that takes the URL as it's argument and tail -f's it. Here's a copy of that answer verbatim: This will do it: #!/bin/bash file=$(mktemp) trap 'rm $file' EXIT (while true; do # shellcheck disable=SC2094 curl --fail -r "$(stat -c %s "$file")"- "$1" >> "$file" done) & pid=$...


4

If you are using Windows then follow these steps: click Start Menu and in "Search programs and files" text box enter "resource" and press ENTER Resource Monitor will start, click "Network" tab There you have listed all processes that are using your bandwidth. Hope this helps you.


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