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9

Since other drives mount in that USB port, assuming they're also USB 3.0 (which uses additional pins), then the likely issue is a faulty key in the Windows Registry, which tracks every USB device ever connected, rather than being due to physical damage to the port. It is usually safe to delete an external USB device's entry, since this data would be ...


6

In my case running following command fixed the issue. It removes log files created my windows which are not cleared properly unless windows is shutdown completely. sudo ntfsfix /dev/sdxX # where x is HDD (in my case it was "a") and X is drive number (in my case it was "7"), so I wrote /dev/sda7


4

This is what works for me on HighSierra 10.13.6, SHFS version 2.5 (OSXFUSE SSHFS 2.5.0) OSXFUSE 3.10.4. FUSE library version: 2.9.7 Based on Rodrigo Farias's answer above + clemisch and Ohad Rubin comments for noting the -J option: sshfs -p port finalserver_username@finalserver:/path/to/folder/on/finalserver/ /local/mount/point -o ssh_command='ssh -J ...


3

I opened up the HD to see if the platters were scratched or carbonized (no) and checked the heads were moving ok and parked properly (yes). You killed it by doing this. HDDs are assembled in clean-room facilities. The head on HDDs float microns above the surface; dust in normal air will make the head crash. Any suggestions about how I can retrieve the ...


3

Remove that trailing slash after sda2 in fstab. So it says /dev/sda2 instead of /dev/sda2/ sda2 isn't a directory, but a file of the type block-device.


3

I was able to recover files from Ubuntu 18.04 guest on Windows 10 host (Virtualbox 6.0) as simply as opening the VDI file in 7-Zip by right-clicking the VDI file -> 7-Zip -> Open archive and drive contents was shown like any other archive.


3

This here Media and Data Integrity Errors: 17,200,105 means it's really really broken. Which is why it put itself into read-only mode. Get it replaced.


3

Sounds like we have a XY problem here. Your problem is not about renaming the device - it's about configuring fstab properly so that mounting always works, no matter what names are assigned to devices. That's the solution, because name assignment isn't reliable. Names can change for example if you have an external hard drive connected on boot. The solution ...


2

I'm also not sure where the boot loader is installed You have an EFI system and a GPT-partitioned disk – the script doesn't understand any of that. The bootloaders (there can be multiple) are stored as files – usually in the "EFI system partition", mounted at /boot/efi in your case. However, double-check the contents of all other FAT-formatted partitions, ...


2

AFAIK ext2/3/4 is based on the generic Linux VFS framework which requires block size to be less than or equal to page size You may experience mounting problems if block size is greater than page size (i.e. 64KiB blocks on a i386 which only has 4KiB memory pages). https://www.kernel.org/doc/html/latest/filesystems/ext4/overview.html There were some talks ...


2

If you want to mount CIFS, you need to specify the credentials for the login. You did it thru -o username= If you want to bind the mountpoint to a specific user, you need to specify the GID/UID thru the options -o uid=$(id -u ben),gid=$(id -g ben) The whole command then becames: mount -t cifs -o username=ben,uid=$(id -u ben),gid=$(id -g ben) //192.168....


2

Answering my own question as I've now discovered the existence of Bubblewrap. It's used in Steam, amongst other things. It is similar to proot but seemingly without the downsides. You can use it like this: bwrap --bind / / --dev-bind /dev /dev --bind "${PWD}"/foo "${PWD}"/bar -- "${SHELL}" Firejail may be another possibility ...


2

Sane partitioning tools shouldn't change the UUID when resizing. I'm not aware of any that would. parted, GParted, Disk Management and diskpart will leave UUID unchanged. As @KamilMaciorowski noted in the comments, fdisk and gdisk don't provide single-step partition resizing. Instead, you're supposed to delete a partition and create a new one with adjusted ...


1

Command ntfsusermap is for "Building a User Mapping File", not for mounting. The message you get probably means that there were no users found in /dev/sda5 to build such mapping file (although a message You have defined no user, no mapping can be built might be expected). If you only want to get access to /dev/sda5 files, you may want to simply ...


1

How about: rsync -r /mnt/ $HOME/ This should copy the contents of /mnt into $HOME. You should probably select a subfolder in your $HOME directory though.


1

I got a definitive answer from GaKu999 at Arch Linux forums. To mount a systemd-homed home directory in another machine without booting to that disk, run the following commands: First, use losetup to setup a loopback device to the home directory file: $ sudo losetup -f -P <username>.home Then, use cryptsetup to open the encrypted LUKS volume. It ...


1

If the disk is making noises then DON'T TURN IT ON. You are perhaps just continuing on scratching the disk surface and making less likely the successful recovery of the data. Send the disk to a professional recovery specialist that can treat each disk platter and recover its data. Be prepared for a large bill, so better do some market research.


1

There is an important distinction to make here: partitions are not filesystems. A "partition" is simply an allocation of contiguous space on a storage device - it's possible to write anything you like to this storage, but it is just a collection of bytes with no particular layout or structure. A "filesystem" is a complex data structure ...


1

But is it possible that I simply mount the downloaded Ubuntu 20.04 .iso image file from my current OS (Windows 10) just like I can with some other applications? It is not currently possible to install Ubuntu from within Windows. While it is possible to mount the ISO, and view the contents of the image, you will be unable start the installation process ...


1

No. cifs-utils is only intended to expose the Linux kernel API for acting as a Samba client, not the other way around. Source: https://wiki.samba.org/index.php/LinuxCIFS


1

Okay, at first I didn't notice my mistake in specifying the destination path where I should locate the mounted folder. In easy words, the mounting point or the destination in the syntax mount sourceFile destinationFile should always contain at least one folder after a specified local drive. For instance, the command, rclone mount gdrive: E:/Newfolder ...


1

Yes, you can simply create the symlink in the parent device (probably your root filesystem). Try this (as root, or use sudo): unmount your crypted partition: sudo umount /media/veracrypt2/ then make a symlink to your download dir: sudo ln -s ~/Downloads /media/veracrypt2/Downloads The symlink is then visible when your crypted partition is not mounted, ...


1

Short answer: no. You'd need to either create an overlay filesystem outside of the container to mount as a volume (not using container folders), or more likely you want to store files inside the container in a different location and restore them on the container startup. I've done the latter with the save-volume and load-volume scripts in this base image ...


1

After communicating with the kind folks at the WSL GitHub repo, I solved my problems by moving all the mount settings into the automount section of /etc/wsl.conf, unmounting the C: drive and rebooting my computer. Basically a "turn it off and on again" solution, but it worked.


1

Using Macrium Reflect free, I've had no trouble browsing images of ~2 TB, though the PC's HDD has only a few hundred GB free and there are numerous other large images on the backup drive. However, "media is protected" doesn't imply you're out of room. In Reflect, there are option to gain access to restricted folders and to make it appear the mounted image ...


1

Or just use blkid's -L option: mount $(blkid -L USBDRIVE) /mnt/usbdrive


1

I had the same issue. I found WSL introduced /etc/wsl.conf since Windows Build 17093. Please read the details in here: https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/windows/wsl/wsl-config#configure-per-distro-launch-settings-with-wslconf This is a simple example that might fix your problem: $ cat /etc/wsl.conf [automount] enabled=true options=metadata,uid=1000,gid=1000,...


1

I realize this is quite old, but I was brought here in my search for the same thing: Using veeam (free agent for linux 4.0) on Ubuntu 16.04 to backup to a modern SMB share hosted on Windows Server 2016. Same as the OP, the configuration was failing via the veeam wizard, and also when I would test a mount command, however adding "vers=3.02" to the ...


1

Removing the bricks is well described in Gluster documentation, https://docs.gluster.org/en/latest/Administrator%20Guide/Managing%20Volumes/ The differences from the currently accepted answer from Siddhartha include sudo gluster volume remove-brick glusterfs 10.240.0.123:/mnt/storage/glusterfs requires adding start at the end Removing the peer is ...


1

I found this blog post very helpful in finding root device and primary disk in Linux. You'll need lsblk utility installed, which is provided by util-linux in CentOS/RHEL. For example, such a variant will give you the disk name of the root device: # lsblk -oMOUNTPOINT,PKNAME -rn | awk '$1 ~ /^\/$/ { print $2 }' sda3 findmnt from the same package will give ...


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