35

NTFS, like ext4, are partition file systems. They only operate on the local computer. You need to “share” a folder in order to make it accessible outside the local computer. Further to that, when sharing via Windows (or Samba), the share permissions also apply. If you’re granted access via the share, you still need access via the underlying file system’s ...


28

The confusion is caused by your using old and new Microsoft documentation, where both are badly worded. NTFS has a permissions model, while the ancient FAT32 does not. In NTFS, files/folders can have permissions. A network share can also have permissions. But one does not imply the other, as both are entirely separate. To access a file folder residing in a ...


19

You ask two questions, so there are two answers: In a Windows NTFS only environment, if I wanted to use NTFS alone to share folders on a LAN, could I do that? No. NTFS is only a disk layout and not a network protocol. You will always need something like SMB (built-in Windows file sharing) or SFTP to make the files accessible over the network. The ...


2

Are the 2 windows you have the same type? i.e. Home vs Professional? or something else? Windows-10 C$ share usually comes disabled by default when UAC is ON. Disabling UAC would allow you that access, since UAC isn't something you should disable especially on Windows-10 due to breaking down of other functionality and app-store apps etc, the only way left ...


2

I know that this post is quite old but I've stumbled across it when I was looking for a solution for the same problem. I haven't seen a ready-made solution that you can buy, but several do it yourself (DIY) approaches. Those DIY approaches are therefore all based on building your own "adapter". The adapter is a Linux-based computer, e.g. a single-...


2

I think you want two opposite things here. Seems to me that what I want is for SMB1 to be disabled. That's the big improvement in samba 4.0 but why is no workgroup available? As your Samba configuration has client min protocol = SMB2, it also prevents smbclient from using SMBv1 to query the server's workgroup name – an operation which has no SMBv2/3 ...


2

The TREE command in Windows 10 will accept a UNC pathname and return the desired results, but there is an undocumented caveat: It will apparently NOT cross a mount point (e.g., if you have a filesystem \\SHARE1\STUFF with a mount point MORESTUF (\\SHARE1\STUFF\MORESTUF), TREE \\SHARE1\STUFF\MORESTUF will throw an error).


2

To run multiple operating systems on one computer simultaneously requires a virtualizing platform like VMware Workstation or Hyper-V (Microsoft). Both work - I continue to prefer VMware Workstation for its flexibility. I have here 11 operating systems plus my Windows 10 host. Three of them are running right now (Windows 7, Kali Linux 2020.4 and Ubuntu Linux ...


1

OK.. ok.. I have thought this through thoroughly and looked up the Win32 API and implementation that make the recycle bin happen. SHFileOperation (the actual function that moves things to the recycle bin) does not support network paths (mapped or not) when the FOF_ALLOWUNDO flag is set (recycle). The trick you found is a workaround that Microsoft might very ...


1

There are several versions of SMB and here is a list for your reference. Based on the provided screenshot, it seems that you disabled SMBv1 on your SMB server. If the SMB server was still accessible, then the SMB connection might be SMBv2 or SMBv3. You could check the SMB version with the following command via Powershell: Get-SMBConnection If the version ...


1

It isn't stored in Computer B at all. The network filesystem is intelligent enough to allow other systems to open files, seek, and otherwise act on the files as if they were "local" to Computer B. Programs can look through files remotely, scan them for the data that they need, and access all the data they need on a "per block" basis ...


1

You seem to be asking this question: Can I access files on ComputerA from ComputerB without sharing them because the files are on NTFS? The answer is no. A caveat is that Windows generally has administrative shares accessible for drives such as \\mycomputer\c$ for the C: drive available to administrators without you having to manually create a share, but ...


1

This is because of a group policy setting which is not allowing insecure guest log ons. Open group policy editor gpedit.msc. Then go to Computer configuration > Administrative Templates > Network > Lanman Workstation then go to Enable insecure guest logins and enable the policy setting. Source: https://www.techcrumble.net/2018/03/you-cant-access-...


1

To prevent people from accessing it, grant read/write or even full control permissions only to your account and delete all other accounts from the ACL. To prevent people from seeing it, you can make it a hidden share by adding $ at the end of the name of the share. Windows will "respect" that and not showing that this share exists, but Linux doesn'...


1

Prerequisite Create an account on the sharing PC, give that account the needed privileges in options of the needed folder(s). And of course you need to have network discovery and sharing enabled. Here's the command to open the right window to enable them. control /name Microsoft.NetworkAndSharingCenter /page Advanced And the PCs don't have to be in the same ...


1

sshfs is relatively simple to use. You can install sshfs on the CentOS box using yum install fuse-sshfs Then from the CentOS box you can run sshfs USER@11.22.33.44:/UBUNTU_DIR_TO_SHARE /LOCAL_DIRECTORY Where USER is the name of the user on CentOS box you log in as, UBUNTU_DIR_TO_SHARE is where you want the files to end up, and /LOCAL_DIRECTORY is ...


1

If a VM is fine, go for it! Due to licensing concerns, it may be easier to use Linux with Samba. A VM for instance would be perfect but as far as I know there is no way to put a VM on the same LAN network as the host & client This is very possible. There’s just one caveat: For this to work 100% reliably, you need a wired network connection. Then, in ...


1

You would do this using the New-SmbShare cmdlet. More information, releated cmdlets and examples can be found on docs.microsoft.com


1

You must allow / force Ubuntu to use a higher protocol version for the SMB-protocol - since Windows 7 at least Microsoft retired by default the old SMB1 protocol and introduced SMB2 / SMB3 ... Windows 10 extends on that principle and by standard enforces SMB3 which leaves you 2 choices : Enforce SMB1 (insecure according to Microsoft) on the Windows 10 ...


1

I had the same error. My issue was that my NAS was losing QuickConnect access whenever I was using my VPN. If you disable the VPN it should work as normal.


1

Which .exe process is responsible for the Windows Explorer to have access to the local network, i.e. when you go in Explorer, and you browser for example \\Livebox\movies? None. Windows Explorer doesn't explicitly make the network connections – it relies on UNC path support that is made available to all programs. That is, as soon as any process accesses \\...


1

Often the issue can be fixed by moving your interface from PUBLIC to PRIVATE. Windows assigns (or asks you to assign) network interfaces to either the PUBLIC or PRIVATE network profile. The firewall in windows is configured to allow pings from devices connecting via interfaces in the PRIVATE profile, but not from devices connecting via interfaces in the ...


1

In Windows Explorer, go to "This PC" and click "Map network drive". Now you can choose the network folder and change the drive letter. No reboot required.


1

So I stumbled upon this question while looking for something else, but having a NAS myself I figured I could assist in some way. I understand this question is old, however, maybe by providing a solid answer or alternative solution this may help others who come across this topic. So the way I see it you can go in two different directions to obtain what you ...


1

The comment to the top answer is a good solution, it does not require mapping network drive, just tries to access the directory with different user account and password, which meets my need. Quoting the comment to here : """""""""""" ...connect to a network share using separate credentials without ...


1

With Process Explorer, one can find which processes are using the directory being used with CTRL+F. Here one can terminate the process or just close the directory in use.


1

I realize this is old, but I ran into a similar issue. I found that I could fix it by setting the folder as a public share, but then also adding access for the users who were already set up with other folders. My setup (for public share in /etc/samba/smb.conf): [Share] comment = Public Share path = /path/to/target/folder available = yes ...


1

If you mean while the guest is running, then you could use: Samba (as already mentioned) an SFTP share such as SFTP Drive Remember SFTP is a subset of SSH, whereas FTPS is a subset of FTP. This means as long as you can connect using SSH then you can connect using SFTP and get the same file/folder permissions on the guest as the user you used to log on.


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