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48

If you need to improve the speed for sshfs connections, try these options: oauto_cache,reconnect,defer_permissions,noappledouble,nolocalcaches,no_readahead command would be: sshfs remote:/path/to/folder local -oauto_cache,reconnect,defer_permissions


35

In Windows 8 (8.1 Enterprise for me here)... There are two parts... First installing the client and second mounting the drive... Installing the client Go to Control Panel → Programs → Programs and Features Select: Turn Windows features on or off" from the left hand navigation. Scroll down to "Services for NFS" and click the "plus" on the left ...


18

I stumbled upon this question just now, because I experienced the exact same problem - and managed to solve it! Although probably uninteresting for OP after several month, others may benefit. If you mount NFS shares from an elevated command prompt (Run as administrator), the mount will not show up in the explorer running with normal user privileges. The ...


15

Just kill the process using pkill to and then un mount the mounted folder path. pkill -kill -f "sshfs" && umount /path/to/sshfs/share


15

To connect to an NFS share, you need to make sure you have the NFS client installed. This component is a part of the Services for Unix component. Go into the control panel, Programs and Features, then Turn Windows features on or off. Make sure Services for Unix-based Applications (DEPRECATED) is checked, and click OK. Be advised that typically only ...


14

I do not have any alternatives to recommend, but I can provide suggestions for how to speed up sshfs: sshfs -o cache_timeout=115200 -o attr_timeout=115200 ... This should avoid some of the round trip requests when you are trying to read content or permissions for files that you already retrieved earlier in your session. sshfs simulates deletes and changes ...


13

I came in late, but here is a real solution: (opensource) Was researching the same thing for win7 pro and found this: http://www.trevorpott.com/?p=385 The University of Michigan NFS v 4.1 client. This is the exact same client for NFS 4.1 that Microsoft included in Windows 8. (Indeed, Microsoft funded its development.) It is located here. However, ...


11

I've used SSHFS in a corporate environment in the past and it is, in my experience, unreliable under heavy load and best suited for casual use. If you need a heavy duty network filesystem go for NFS or CIFS (Samba). You will have to trade encryption for stability, though, unless you use NFSv4, which supports encryption. So yes, you could use NFSv4 as a ...


10

driver: http://www.citi.umich.edu/projects/nfsv4/windows/ On its NFSv4 project website, the University of Michigan's Center for Information Technology Integration (CITI) has announced that, after 18 months of development and since the start of September, source code for its Windows driver for distributed file system NFSv4.1 has been available from a Git ...


9

For NFSv4 ID mapping to work properly, both client and server must be running the idmapd ID Mapper daemon and have the same Domain configured in /etc/idmapd.conf. This way your NFS Client sends its ID credentials as roger@example.com in the NFS commands on the wire, and your NFS Server idmapper maps that to a user called roger on the NFS Server. The UID and ...


8

If this is NFS4 on Linux, the following seems to do the trick: mount -o remount /share/


8

A friend helped me track this down and found this is a bug as recorded in Bugzilla 38572 for the Linux kernel here. The bug is supposedly fixed in version 3.0.0 of the kernel, but present at least in version 2.6.38. The issue is that the server's ReadDIR() RPC call returns incorrect results. This occurs because of the following: When the client reads a ...


8

I presume that your NFS share is automounted, yes? Before the share is actually mounted, /vol/mynfs is just an empty directory, so ls shows it as that. Moving to that directory forces the mount to actually happen, so the ls after that shows the contents of the now-mounted directory. The files will be listable as long as the share is actually mounted. If ...


7

You are probably getting freezes because you are exporting NFS shares with the "hard" option (which is the default). You can change that by using explicitly the "soft" option. The NFS man page has more. mount -o soft <nfs server ip>:/mountpoint /local_mountpoint Then in the clients you should no longer have a problem with freezes. As for a ...


7

Services for Network File System (NFS) feature is available only in the Windows 8 Enterprise edition. This feature is not available in Windows 8 and Windows 8 Pro editions. Users when upgrading from Windows 7 Ultimate or Windows 7 Enterprise edition to Windows 8 Pro edition can no longer use Services for NFS feature. In order to continue to use Services for ...


7

This is usually caused by the configuration on the NFS server. NFS servers will often map UID 0 (root) to another user such as "nobody" or "nfsnobody". You need to specify on the NFS server which clients are allowed root access to the mount. On Linux, you usually need to specify no_root_squash in the /etc/exports file where the export is defined. For ...


7

Use the no_root_squash option in your /etc/exports entry. From the manual page for exports: User ID Mapping nfsd bases its access control to files on the server machine on the uid and gid provided in each NFS RPC request. The normal behavior a user would expect is that she can access her files on the server just as she would on a normal file ...


6

After searching and trial. I just found add -o Compression=no speed it a lot. The delay may be caused by the compression and uncompression process. Besides, use 'Ciphers=aes128-ctr' seems faster than others while some post has done some experiments on this. Then, my command is somehow like this: sshfs -o allow_other,transform_symlinks,follow_symlinks,...


6

The disk is an NFS mounted disk. When I go to the host computer that publishes the drive, the file is only listed once. Probably a bug, issue, or race condition with NFS. It's possible to have two files of the same name if you directly edit the filesystem structures using a hex editor. However I'm not sure what would happen if you try to delete or open ...


6

Of course, right after posting this question I find this NixOS wiki article about NFS and bind mount examples: https://nixos.wiki/wiki/NFS TL;DR: Instead of fsType, I should have used options. At the time of writing this, the wiki is slightly out of date; options must be a list of strings. This code snippet seems to work as expected: # # /etc/nixos/...


6

You likely have automounter on top of /misc directory. Have a look at your /etc/auto.master and /etc/auto.misc files to figure out what is (auto)mounted there.


5

There is no solution with Microsoft's NFS client in Windows 7 There are no way to solve your problem under this setting, not even the method given in the "Correct Answer" of this question. This is not a mistake, it is by design to create the barrier you are facing. It is not possible that the designer of NFS Client offer the option to use BIG5, EUC-KR, EUC-...


5

I had the same issue with mount_nfs: can't access /: Permission denied on OS X 10.6.8 and even with the resvport option it still failed however modifying the nfs server export mount to use the insecure option worked.


5

Unless you have Windows 8 Enterprise, you won't be able to accomplish this without 3rd party apps. I was able to NFS drives mounted in Windows 8 using NekoDrive. You will also need to install the Dokan library. You can then set up the application to auto-mount the drive. http://code.google.com/p/nekodrive/ http://web.archive.org/web/20150222074745/http://...


5

That folder should just contain Wine specific profile files and files installed in the virtual Windows-like environment via Wine. Its basic structure is easily recreated by just running wine again. You could/should check why it takes up a lot of space, though, so you don't accidentally delete some useful data that you have forgotten about. I just did a test,...


5

Edit: Since the problem only occurs when the NFS server goes down AFTER the share has already been successfully mounted, the previous answer does not help. My only suggestion now is to use autofs to mount the NFS shares on-demand, instead of mounting them on boot. This way, the system will only attempt to mount the NFS shares when you try to access them, ...


4

NFSv4 has a concept of a "virtual" root of the overall exported filesystem. The export mount point with fsid=root will be used as this "virtual" root. Try adding the fsid=root option into your /etc/exports server configuration file, then reload the list of exported directories again by running exportfs -arv. You may need to restart the nfsd service again ...


4

I found turning off my zsh theme that was checking git file status helped enourmously - just entering the directory was taking 10+ minutes. Likewise turning off git status checkers in Vim.


4

rsync is slower than NFS if rsync is CPU-bound. rsync is much less efficient than NFS when it comes to the mere transfer of the data. In my case, rsync consumed 100% CPU while NFS needed only 20%, and NFS was still faster by a factor of 3. This means that rsync comsumed 15 times (!) more CPU resources than NFS for the same amount of network traffic. I ...


4

ZFS will share filesystems over NFS or CIFS, and ZVOLS over iSCSI. If you really want close to local, you'd have to export a ZVOL over iSCSI. Your second choice would be CIFS. Considering that you're talking so casually about NFS on Windows, are you by any chance running Ultimate or Enterprise? I'm not aware of any other popular NFS client for Windows ...


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