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ssh doesn't support this. Here are a couple of workarounds: use a system configuration manager like Ansible or Puppet to automatically create your ssh config from a template. run your own DNS server with a custom zone like "host.local" that resolves names like "this.host.local" or "that.host.local" to the IPs you choose. set up ...


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Use ssh-keygen -l -f filename to see key details. For the "key generated on your older computer", you will get: 3072 SHA256:oOI4YwCA2Yu1qJJ7dCM2pH5f49gUbJs0Kl5kDL7KNDI old-mac@key.example (RSA) and for the key "on the newer": 2048 SHA256:7uJvPe1MKKcfWpIGo3Mr4x5zNHZAXL3Y92C5rzZVBDs new-mac@key.example (RSA) So the keys differ by the ...


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SSHFS uses the SFTP subsystem. This is a FUSE-based solution, get familiar with security concerns. You can (and should) do the mounting as a normal user: sshfs user@server:some/path /some/local/mountpoint/ Then use du -sh locally. If the path of the directory you want is some/path/foo/directory on the remote system, then you need to use /some/local/...


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I think the errors are caused by using Powershell(x86) instead of Powershell. When using Powershell(x86), I also get an error: But if I use Powershell, then everything is normal Powershell (x86) is the 32-bit version while Powershell is the 64-bit version as described here: On a Windows 64-bit edition, you will find a 32-bit and a 64-bit version of ...


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This sound pretty similar to a This Other Post Shameless repost This is a GREAT question, I always wondered too. The short answer is No. You cannot. So I decided to do it myself. You can use a simple script to get the desired functionality. I wrote a Github Pages post for this TLDR On UNIX, Try this: (On Windows, read my Github Pages Post) ~/.ssh/scripts/...


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