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For most public-key algorithms in SSH, there is a fixed hash algorithm used for signatures. For example, for Ed25519, it's SHA-512. RSA keys (that is, ssh-rsa) traditionally used SHA-1, but that's no longer a secure option. Recently, support for SHA-2 (SHA-256 and SHA-512) signatures with RSA were added, and there were additional components added to the ...


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As it turns out, in my case I had an outdated environment variable in my PowerShell/Cmd environment, SSH_AUTH_SOCK. It was pointing to a nonexistent socket/pipe, which led the ssh-add utility to (rightfully) complain that there was "no such file or directory." Simply removing the environment variable altogether did the trick of allowing ssh-add to ...


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Use ssh-keygen -l -f filename to see key details. For the "key generated on your older computer", you will get: 3072 SHA256:oOI4YwCA2Yu1qJJ7dCM2pH5f49gUbJs0Kl5kDL7KNDI old-mac@key.example (RSA) and for the key "on the newer": 2048 SHA256:7uJvPe1MKKcfWpIGo3Mr4x5zNHZAXL3Y92C5rzZVBDs new-mac@key.example (RSA) So the keys differ by the ...


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Generate your key without a passphrase ...> ssh-keygen then make sure the public key is placed within the authorized_keys file under the .ssh directory of the target machine. I did this by hand. I don't remember the details I used one of the many online examples of how to do this then when you run ...> ssh -i <private_key_file> squidward@...


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Install rmate on your Ubuntu machine and use 'sudo rmate file.txt' to open sublimetext locally with rsub installed.


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The above answer (and the comments of its author) has some flaws: It mixes up roles of server and client. As this answer is (as judged by moderating co-members) diverging too much from the original to be accepted as a mere edit, it is posted here in its entirety: A possible way to deploy the public-key authentication method is the following: Assume you have ...


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When you login as an ssh client to cygwin ssh server it seems like ssh session does not have access to all of the windows commands. But there is a workaround, the idea is create service to execute windows command and launch it from startup script use this service by adding command to execute at file at cygwinhome. Here is the implementation. Service reads ...


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ssh doesn't support this. Here are a couple of workarounds: use a system configuration manager like Ansible or Puppet to automatically create your ssh config from a template. run your own DNS server with a custom zone like "host.local" that resolves names like "this.host.local" or "that.host.local" to the IPs you choose. set up ...


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Notepad is not an X11 app. Overall, the Windows graphics system is not X11-based at all.


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In your ~/.bashrc on the remote server, you can add a line like this: if [ -n "$PS1" ] then printf '\033]0;%s@%s\007' "$(id -un)" "$(hostname)" fi That will keep the operation from running when you run a script or command non-interactively over SSH. Note that many people prefer to keep their dotfiles in a Git repository and ...


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This sound pretty similar to a This Other Post Shameless repost This is a GREAT question, I always wondered too. The short answer is No. You cannot. So I decided to do it myself. You can use a simple script to get the desired functionality. I wrote a Github Pages post for this TLDR On UNIX, Try this: (On Windows, read my Github Pages Post) ~/.ssh/scripts/...


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SSHFS uses the SFTP subsystem. This is a FUSE-based solution, get familiar with security concerns. You can (and should) do the mounting as a normal user: sshfs user@server:some/path /some/local/mountpoint/ Then use du -sh locally. If the path of the directory you want is some/path/foo/directory on the remote system, then you need to use /some/local/...


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I set this up correctly. I woke up this morning and I auto-logged in. I guess there is a propagation issue when setting up ssh keys.


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I think the errors are caused by using Powershell(x86) instead of Powershell. When using Powershell(x86), I also get an error: But if I use Powershell, then everything is normal Powershell (x86) is the 32-bit version while Powershell is the 64-bit version as described here: On a Windows 64-bit edition, you will find a 32-bit and a 64-bit version of ...


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Ensure the -i parameter is used to specify your identity file; for instance change: From: %home%\ssh -v -o LogLevel=Verbose user@11.111.111.11 "do something" To: %home%\ssh -v -o LogLevel=Verbose user@11.111.111.11 -i id_rsa "do something"


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