New answers tagged

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Things you can try : re-creating windows 7 bootable USB (hope you have the iso) from linux(mint in your case)(instructions - https://www.ghacks.net/2018/05/25/windows-bootable-usb-woeusb/amp/) or just partition drive and install linux mint (can remove afterwards if not needed) and use linux mint grub to boot windows or use boot repair (it comes pre-installed ...


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Most filesystems have their own "size" independent of the underlying device (partition). It seems a bit like Reflect simply dumped the original filesystem into a larger partition, but did not update any NTFS structures to match. From within Windows, you can probably fix this via DISKPART. Select the volume using list vol and select vol num, then ...


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If you have installed linux after windows, You can use EasyBCD to add Linux entry to the windows boot manager. Download and install it and go to Linux/BSD tab. Set Type to Grub 2 and name Pop OS. And set Drive to automatically locate and load then click Add Entry. Now make sure windows partition is in the Boot priority #1 in BIOS/UEFI and you will get ...


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It seems like you are trying to create a multi-boot USB with Windows editions. You need specialized third-party software for it, since Windows itself does not support multi-partition USB. The specialized app will still make it work. The disk software contained in the BIOS is very limited, since it is not supposed to do much beyond loading up software from ...


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I will not use Multiple partitions on a USB drive, I like a tool named WinSetupFromUSB (www.winsetupfromusb.com/downloads/). You can download it and then you can place multiple ISO images in a USB drive and when you will boot from USB it will show a menu for choosing bootable image. It supports both BIOS/UEFI and windows editions from 2000. Although no Linux ...


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I had same problem and tried several things and two recovery software (MiniTool and EaseUs) and only EaseUs Data Recovery Wizard (search hash: 4E4A8F12443DC9A6D9456E81348D7B3A7EF45310 ) was able to recover non-damaged files in my case. I only wish i know about the way to repair the partition itself without need to format and copy all the data from backups.


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If your second OS, one to which you are not able to boot has no problems. Next steps, I believe, are the simplest solution: Boot into Windows RE or Windows PE environment and open up the CMD run diskpart When you enter into diskpart dialog run list volume note your partitions and type exit run C:\ run dir just to make sure you are on the partition with ...


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How to verify if it is 4k aligned? Let's take /dev/sdb1 as an example. It starts at the logical sector 233455616. Your logical sectors are of the size 512 bytes. Sectors are numbered from 0, so there are exactly 233455616 logical sectors before the partition, each taking 512 bytes. To verify the 4k-alignment you need to check if this offset can be expressed ...


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The logical sector size is 512 bytes, so in order to be 4k-aligned (to match your physical sectors), the partition's starting sector must be an exact multiple of 4096⁄512 = 8. So just go through all numbers in the "Start" column and divide each by 8. If you get a whole number, that partition is aligned; if you get decimals, it isn't. For example, ...


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Removable media devices cannot have more than one boot entry added to the UEFI boot menu. The boot manager finds the first EFI partition that contains \EFI\BOOT\BOOT{machine type short name}.EFI before moving to the next device, so any additional partitions, however properly formatted, are ignored. Haven't got a clue why it's designed that way. UEFI Spec v2....


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Just about any MBR type collection lists partition type 0xFF as “XENIX Bad Block Table” (hence BBT). This is most certainly not what the media player uses. It’s most likely a proprietary format. You may be able to find information on the net when searching for the specific media player model.


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I want to suggest the following software that can isolate bad sectors: Repartition Bad Drive: Repartition Bad Drive is a free utility from Abstradrome which is intended to isolate unrecoverable bad sectors from partitions. If HDD Regenerator reports that bad sectors cannot be regenerated, then the hard drive contains unrecoverable bad sectors. Partition Bad ...


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The purpose of Linux partition type codes defined in the Discoverable Partitions Specification is to make writing /etc/fstab obsolete for most systems. It’s a case of convention over configuration. Systemd added systemd-gpt-auto-generator back in 2014 in version 211. This generator creates .mount units from GPT partitions on the boot drive. So you can use ...


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There is no purpose, just convenience, and you may use any code you like. I quote below a great answer by Rod Smith, the author of GPT fdisk, which explains the whole subject: kyodake's answer is correct, but it's also rather MBR-centric. Under GPT, the same principles apply -- that is, a partition type code identifies the intended purpose of a partition. ...


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The need for a code for /home and other partitions is stated here by Rod Smith who created and up to now (2020) contribute to the code of gpt fdisk. This is from him in 2011: I've recently discovered that when Windows reads a GPT disk with Linux partitions on it, those partitions are given drive letters and show up as unformatted. This situation can happen ...


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I found something that works for me. Select your partition in diskpart, then do delete partition override.


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I suggest this: Create a Windows installation USB on another computer (if you don't already have one) Boot into the Command Prompt Undo your changes using the reg command (I hope you exported as backup the registry keys you changed). Note that you will need to use the REG LOAD command to operate on the registry in d:\windows\system32\config. Reboot. If ...


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Gparted seems to recommend to hell with diskmgmt.msc shrink, but rather, just go ahead with the re-partition chopping off all the (mid disk) system files (paging files, hibernation file and system restore files as mentioned above) and then use the pre-created system recovery disk to restore sense to your C drive if Windows does not boot. Turning off paging ...


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I was able to restore the CHS (Cylinder/Head/Sector) in my partition map by issuing the following command: diskutil repairDisk disk0 I'm not sure if it was absolutely necessary to do this as I read that "GPT knows nothing about CHS geometries" in Rod's documentation, but I feel much better now that it is back to its original state.


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What happens physically if I want to copy some files to an external hard drive and do cp -a [file] /dev/sdX instead of cp -a [file] /dev/sdX1? Assuming that you have proper permissions, neither command would write the file in a manner that is readily retrievable. Both commands would cause the contents of file to be directly written to LBAs (aka sectors) and ...


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A disk like /dev/sdX can be seen as a number of bytes where the number of bytes matches the disk size. On a disk like /dev/sdX you can place some kind of partition table, but you don't have to place a partition table on your disk, you can simply access your /dev/sdX as an ordinary file if you so wish or you can place a file system directly on /dev/sdX. With ...


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Go to Disk Management. Right click on "unallocated space and format as NTFS. You will get your remaining space as a new partition.


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Since you're using EFI boot, you can simply extract the ISO image to any FAT32 partition and boot it. EFI doesn't use any hidden data such as bootsectors, it's only relying on presence of some files in filesystem hierarchy. On Linux the ISO can be mounted and its content copied to destination. On Windows I'm using 7-Zip for this purpose. Don't use Windows's ...


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As the sgdisk manual does not state anything about possible deletion of the backup GPT in the documentation of the "-o" parameter you could use a hex editor to search for the backup table using "EFI PART". When you find it duplicate it to a postion starting with the 2nd sector on your disc. When your hex editor starts with sector 0, it is ...


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You may have hit this issue or something similar. First, make backups and ensure they are restorable. Then you can use this method to resize the partition. In short, gdisk will happily work on mounted partitions, so you can delete this partition, create a larger one and partprobe to notify the kernel of changes while the partition is live. As long as ...


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It fully depends on you. Ask these questions of yourself to find out how should you partition your HDD: How much is is my HDD capacity? What do I do most in my PC? How do I prefer to organize my data? For example, I have a 1TB (1000GB) HDD. I'm a developer so I usually use heavy and big programs and have many downloads. I partitioned my HDD like this: ...


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My suggestion is to add a NEW VIRTUAL DISK and mount it in a place where it will do the most good. You can find out how to do this by searching "xenserver new virtual disk" on the internetS. I don't know XenServer but they are all the same.. this is a Linux concept and has nothing to do with your virtualization host (XenServer). You need to ...


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fdisk doesn't extend disks, it only deals with partitions – and your disk doesn't have any, so there's no reason to use fdisk. Since you already extended the whole disk (i.e. the "xvdb" device as shown by lsblk) and there aren't any other intermediate layers, your next step is to grow the filesystem, i.e. allow it to occupy the space it has ...


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You have to reduce the unmovable files. I have created a powershell script that will do it for you. set-wmiinstance -class win32_computersystem -argument @{AutomaticManagedPagefile="false"}; (get-wmiobject -class win32_pagefilesetting).Delete(); powercfg /h off; disable-computerrestore -drive "C:"; defrag C: /l /d /g /k /h /u /v Disable ...


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Windows has the bad habit of placing essential Windows files at the end and the middle of the system disk. These files are unmovable, probably because Windows addresses them directly by sector-number. The Windows Disk Management knows not to move them, but Linux applications will move them in order to resize the disk in effect breaking Windows, so are to be ...


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Ok gys I finally found out the answer . Its default value with jinja template. Example code below: vi hw.j2 Disks capacities /dev/sda : {{ ansible_devices.sda.size|default("NONE", true) }} /dev/sdb : {{ ansible_devices.sdb.size|default("NONE", true) }} /dev/sdc : {{ ansible_devices.sdc.size|default("NONE", ...


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GPT partition tables already have one. Your root filesystem has one, too. Run blkid disk.img to list them – it'll show filesystem UUIDs as UUID= and partition UUIDs as PARTUUID=. Unfortunately, it seems current GRUB versions do not yet support using partition UUIDs. When the support is added it'll be available under the search.partuuid command. Meanwhile you ...


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Gaps are normal when partitioning, but they’re usually in the megabytes, so not really important. They help align partitions (and as such, filesystems) to physical boundaries like blocks, erase blocks or whatever. As for LVM (Logical Volume Manager), I’ll just quote Wikipedia: LVM is used for the following purposes: Creating single logical volumes of ...


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Had the exact same problem. When I was using Ubuntu I made a partition (NTFS) and after a while installed Windows but the drive didn't mount. The problem was, there wasn't any drive letter assigned to it so it didn't mount. To resolve this: Click on the drive in Disk management. Then select change drive letter and assign a drive letter to it. That's it. It'...


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If you can boot, then EFI has been cloned successfully. As you have used the well-know Acronis tool for cloning, it seemed to have done correctly the cloning into a smaller disk. However, Acronis being a Windows product, it probably did a bad job on the Linux partitions, which are perhaps the ones you have encircled in red. If you would like to verify their ...


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So far I've been searching on the internet and I only found advertisement for softwares that you need to buy in order to do such a simple task, the only reliable software that helped me do it in simple way and FREE is the Paragon Partition Manager


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Windows uses internal addresses for physical disk that look like \\.\PHYSICALDRIVE0 and \\.\PHYSICALDRIVE1. Many such addresses can be found in the registry to point to disks and folders (\\.\PHYSICALDRIVE0\folder). To see the designations for your disks, use the command wmic diskdrive list brief. By cloning Windows, you have also cloned the registry. What ...


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For example, select all devices except loop* and display size - set_fact: my_devices: "{{ ansible_devices.keys()| reject('match', '^loop(.*)$')| list }}" - debug: msg: "{{ item }} {{ ansible_devices[item].size }}" loop: "{{ my_devices }}" give msg: ...


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An EFI/EUFI bootloader can reside in a NTFS partition if there is a capsule driver for NTFS in EUFI. ONLY one partition at all, on all your PC. That is not a problem as was said correctly above. Moreover, you do not actually even need to GPT the drive (officially the UEFI 2.x spec requires support for both GPT and MBR partitions. Pages 324 (9.3.6.1), also 72,...


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I'm not familiar with the specific software you are using, but generally speaking partitions have to be contiguous. You will have to move or delete the smaller partition between the C drive and the unallocated space, so that there's nothing between the two disk areas that you want to combine. The easiest way to accomplish this would probably be to move (via ...


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