64

No. Chances are very slim that your laptop has a 10 gigabit ethernet adaptor - its uncommon on high end desktops. You'd also need some clever hardware to translate between PCI-e to ethernet, and the latency, oh the latency. You have a device which is typically put as close to the processor as possible with 16 dedicated pci-e lanes right into it, and you'd ...


60

Many devices use more than 1 lane. For example - gaming graphics cards use 16 lanes. Some powerful gaming computers have two graphics cards - that's 32 PCIe lanes (two x16 ports). Intel i7-5820K can't handle two x16 graphics cards. For some gaming enthusiasts or some engineers, that may be a serious problem. They may have to choose different CPU (maybe ...


59

If the GPU is using legacy interrupts for some reason, it may be suffering from high latency while the CPU is busy handling other interrupt handlers for that IRQ. Your motherboard's user manual specifies that the PCIE x16_1 slot (the top one) shares IRQ assignments with the internal graphics, HD Audio, USB 2.0 (EHCI), and PCI 2 slot. Modern motherboards ...


45

Your CPU has 40 PCIe 3.0 lanes: Intel® Xeon® Processor E5-2620 v4 The communications with your GPUs will be direct from your CPU. This is good, after all the memory controller is also integrated on the CPU meaning that the fastest route for data in memory is from RAM -> CPU -> GPU rather than RAM - CPU -> Chipset -> GPU The motherboard connects the PCIe ...


40

There are four basic "levels" of adding more SATA ports: A USB-SATA adapter is cheap and easy, and quite fast with modern UASP (USB-attached-SCSI) support. However, they may not be good long-term as many of them do not support TRIM and cheaper (3.0/3.1gen1, 5 Gbps) ones are still slightly slower than internal SATA 3.0 (6 Gbps). Additionally, you end up ...


36

All PCIe SSDs support any number of PCIe lanes. Both devices and slots are intercompatible providing you can find a card that will fit. Most native PCIe SSDs are fairly expensive and require a larger slot, so you will need an open-ended x1 slot. M.2 SSDs don't fit into PCIe directly but you can get cheap, passive adapters like this one, though obviously you ...


29

After quite a bit of search i found this paragraph in a document called PCI Express™ Card Electromechanical Specification Revision 1.1 : As shown in Figure 5-1, a ridge feature is defined on the top of the connector housing on one side. This feature can be used to facilitate card retention. A retention clip may be mounted on 15 an add-in card and latched ...


25

A PCIe 'lane' consists of 2 differential pairs of signals. One differential pair is used for sending and the other is used for receiving, which allows simultaneous bi-directional communication. Each lane is point-to-point. That is, each lane directly attaches a single host to a single device. PCIe switches can, however, be used when a host lane needs to be ...


23

Using lspci -vv, you can get the transfer rate and compare it with the transfer rate specified for the revisions. A sample output would read: # lspci -vv | grep -E 'PCI bridge|LnkCap' 00:02.0 PCI bridge: NVIDIA Corporation C51 PCI Express Bridge (rev a1) (prog-if 00 [Normal decode]) LnkCap: Port #2, Speed 2.5GT/s, Width x1, ASPM L0s L1, ...


21

The computer would most likely not boot. It might short out. See, a PCI x4 slot is not four as large as an x1 slot. All PCI-e connectors have a shared layout: The first 18 pairs of connectors are for power supply, SMbus and JTAG communications, clock sync etc. Only then come the data pairs. This means there is only one way to correctly connect them. Any ...


20

Nothing... The PCIE key slot would prevent a card being inserted anywhere except the front of the bus. Therefore, only one card can be entered in a slot at a time. If you were to remove the key, you may end up damaging your cards and/or your board. The PCIE key is the first few pins, followed by a gap, and then the rest of the pins.


19

It's done at the electrical level, not by software. The two registers you've listed above, LNK_CAP and LNK_STA are what you correctly noted as 'Here's what the link is capable of' and 'Here the current status'. There is also SLT_CAP and SLT_STA, which may be worth a look as that is specific to a given 'slot' in the machine. The PCIe spec defines a LTSSM -- ...


18

Connecting a GPU by Ethernet is like connecting your PS3 controller to the PS/2 keyboard port: sounds like it's trying to fix a problem but the solution turns out to be completely outlandish and impractical. (Granted, if you can pull it off, you'll gain more popularity as that one crazy guy.) That said, I advise you not to try to do this because the ...


16

You can use the "dmidecode" command to give an in depth list of all the hardware on the system and then view that. I did a "quick and dirty" command to show the pertinent bit as follows: dmidecode | grep "PCI" Which returned PCI is supported Type: x16 PCI Express 2 x8 Type: x8 PCI Express 2 x4 Type: x8 PCI Express 2 x4 Type: x8 PCI Express 2 x4 Type: ...


15

It is "power over eSATA", or perhaps "eSATA with power". It's an eSATA port but with additional pins that supply power to the drive - which fixes an issue with eSATA that made USB 3.0 look a lot more attractive. Also known as eSATA-p and several other variations. It hasn't seen wide adoption. It's been effectively replaced by USB 3.0. Aside: I do have an ...


14

lsblk -io NAME,TYPE,SIZE,MOUNTPOINT,FSTYPE,MODEL will identify all the block devices, i.e., drives. Then, run sudo hdparm -I /dev/sd*X* | grep SATA where X is each drive letter found. If the result contains SATA, well, it's the SATA drive. Alternatively, lspci will identify all the PCI devices, including PCIe. Or, you can look for the NVMe logo on ...


14

Your motherboard is a MSI Z-170 Pro. This is a board with a Z170 chipset for Skylake CPU's. That means it has 16 PCI-e lanes from the skylake CPU and a 4 more from the Z170 chipset (all PCI-e v3). That is 20 PCI-e lanes in total, not a lot. It needs these lanes to connect to devices such as NICs, SATA ports, M2 slots, general PCI-e slots etc etc. But it ...


13

I've recently been looking into getting a PCIe to SATA expansion card, otherwise known as a port multiplier, because I no longer have any free SATA ports on my system, but I'm confused about how exactly these cards work and how I can determine whether my PC will support them. Your motherboard supports PCIe SATA expansion cards. Adding additional SATA ports,...


12

You must go to the directory of the PCIe slot in question, for instance eth0: cd /sys/class/net/eth0/device where you will find numa_node, local_cpus, and local_cpulist, the three files of interest to you. You can just cat them, and see the desired data.


12

Yes, but it won't be as fast as advertised. The PCI Express standards mandate proper down-negotiation of the exact PCI Express version being used on any given link to the maximum version supported by both endpoints. This means you can use PCI Express devices for any version of the spec (provided they are properly compliant with the spec) with a mainboard/...


10

Really this should not have been possible as the PCIe 8-pin connector was designed to have a completely different arrangement of pin shapes than the existing EPS12V connector. These are shown in the image below (notice the difference in bevelling on the corners): (Image from here) It appears from the picture you posted that the cable that when you pushed ...


10

Probably not at commodity pricing for another few years. The current offerings are all high-end, using 10/40 Gbps connections and Nvidia Tesla cards. Even then, it's not directly usable for gaming or graphics, but more for CUDA processing. e.g. http://www.chelsio.com/gpudirect-rdma/


9

As noted in another answer, PCI express will automatically train to the highest mutually supported speed regardless of which version is at each end of the link (via the speed advertisement field in the TS1 and TS2 ordered sets during link up. For details look at the PCIe LTSSM) provided the link itself can support that speed. In your case, the link will ...


8

I was just wondering why PCIe devices can't share the same lanes. PCIe uses a point-to-point topology, so each lane expects one device on each end. If it wasn't, it'd be something like the original PCI - one issue with plain PCI is that when one device is talking on the bus, others have to wait.


8

I found a solution to my situational problem since I am required to have the 670 as a secondary card so it can be passed through, I was able to find a setting in my BIOS under "System Agent Configuration" (or something like that) to set a "Main Display" which allowed me to select between "IGPU", "PCIE" and "PCI" up till now I had thought "PCI" stood for ...


8

HWiNFO has more reliable detection than CPUID. For example, on my system CPUID wasn't able to detect PCI-E revision, but HWINFO was.


8

Yes, the southbridge is capable of supporting PCIe in some cases, but in maximum cases it is supported by the northbridge. I used to own an Asus motherboard (P5GZ-MX) based on the Intel 945GZ + ICH7 chipset. The board supported PCIe via the Southbridge Intel ICH 7 (I/O Controller Hub) as the Northbridge 945GZ Express chipset did not support PCI Express. The ...


7

There are two ways a motherboard can provide more PCI-e lanes then the chipset provides: Some modern CPU's provide PCI-e lanes of their own. (in addition to the lanes provided by the chipset) There are PCI-e switches which provide extra PCI-e lanes. Think of this as an Y shape. The bottom of the Y can be 16 PCI-e lanes connected to the normal places on the ...


7

Why the tree output shows that all the devices connect to the same PCI bus(bus 00)? Because that's how PCIe structure works: All devices are connected to a single root node. (Though you can have several PCIe domains, but that complicates things). For Intel, all external PCIe lanes, no matter if they originate from the CPU or the PCH, are behind PCIe ...


6

Not with ethernet, but with PCIe and Thunderbolt. This article breaks down the external GPU (eGPU) landscape well. A number of companies sell PCIe/Thunderbolt enclosures. Some are limited by Thunderbolt's power, some have their own power. MSI GUS II using Thunderbolt and limited to 150W. Akitio Thunder2 PCIe Box using Thunderbolt 2, but only provides 25W. ...


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