19

Is it perhaps P2P protocol data? Yes, it is. sometimes the incoming transfer size approaches 1kB, which seems inplausible for simple overhead. A transient peak of a few KB/s for transferring the handshake, extension handshake, bitfield and metadata transfer is normal for all clients.


6

BitTorrent protocol is designed in a distributed way to reuse also data blocks of incomplete files. Your computer advertises certain files and than your peers are requesting data blocks - initially your advertisement goes to your direct peers which is than further relayed by distributed database (hash table). Thus the number of peers which know your files ...


6

Based on your response: @ewhac The TCP window size on the local machine usually differs from the window size on the remote machine. The default value is 0.06 MB on local (win 8) and 0.01 MB on remote (vista). Do they have to be the same value? How do I ask it to guess the MSS? Would that be the -m switch ("print maximum segment size")? I usually ...


5

As previously stated, you will need to modify the TCP Window size in iperf to get higher throughput over low latency high speed links. Different versions of Windows (or iPerf) may have different default window sizes. Try "-w 256k" to start with on both the client and server. Can you confirm the arrow direction of your charts? In iPerf, data is pushed ...


4

This is a frequently asked question. Unfortunately it rarely gets a correct answer. While there are many different causes to fluctuations in the download speed, in this case with many peaks over 30 MB/s, the most likely reason is that the download speed exceeds what can be written out to disk. Sequential writes to disk can be done in much higher speeds ...


3

Cryptocurrency products use the following TCP ports (not UDP): Bitcoin : 8333 Bitcoin Testnet : 18333 Litecoin: 9333 Dash: 9999 Dogecoin: 22556 Ethereum: 30303 This port is only used for full nodes which do validations of transactions and blocks for Internet clients, but are not required for non-validating lightweight clients. Full nodes are defined as: ...


3

A couple of point which may help you out.. TCP IP stack is now implemented differently in post Windows 7 releases. I would look closely at my TCP optimisations, there may not be much in it between your two boxes but still worth tweaking some settings on your vista Box. The use of netsh int tcp set global congestionprovider=ctcp has been depreciated. In ...


3

I think u need to read a little bit more about how iperf works. If you don't set the correct tcp window size your results will vary a lot. I believe its the -w switch. This website will assist with calculating the optimal TCP window size. You need to know the RTT and bandwith to calculate it. http://www.kehlet.cx/docs/tcpwin.php Also try other tools like "...


2

One thing you have not tried is removing Remote Differential Compression on Vista. My thinking is motivated by the extensive CPU use on Vista. It might be that the Vista network driver does not know how to offload this to the network card, while Windows 8 does it much more efficiently. For full details see the article : Prevent slow file copying over the ...


2

Something to try is to stop the MMCSS service. Yes, you will lose your audio temporarily, but it could be that something is activating it, causing the network activity to be throttled so that the network activity doesn't drown out other activity. See here for some info about MMCSS and network throttling: http://blogs.technet.com/b/markrussinovich/archive/...


2

Great results with Ubuntu LINUX This sounds quite familiar... you get inexplicably bad iperf performance in Windows, but the same hardware works fine with Linux. After fighting this battle over and over, I have come to the conclusion that iperf in Windows is flaky. I don't know why... honestly, I've quit caring because I know I can always get sane results ...


2

One of the torrent file spec descriptions is over here. The file format itself doesn't really have limitations like you're asking about. There might be one related to hash collisions but those are pretty unlikely to occur naturally. Torrent utilities themselves may impose limits. The main one is, while integers in the torrent files have no upper bound, ...


2

I presume you are asking about splitting the (usually large) file that a .torrent file describes. If your purpose is downloading the file from a single seeder in a shorter period of time, then BitTorrent protocol already does it for you. It uses segmented file transfer and if you and your friend connect at the same time, your clients will download different ...


2

I'm not completely sure what you mean by trackable, but a lot of bittorrent clients will open a port on your router firewall using UPnP making you detectable and potentially exposing your computer to anyone who has found an exploitable bug in the networking code of the bittorrent client. It's not that likely there will be such a bug, but it is not outside ...


2

Assuming the question is about home/residential connections: Most wired ISPs do in fact give a publicly reachable IPv4 address to their customers. That address is assigned to the customer's home router, and that router can receive packets and forward them to whichever internal device the customer specifies. (It already has to do this in order to correctly ...


2

If the other party can set up port forwarding (or doesn't use NAT), you're all done. A TCP connection is always duplex-capable. If that's not possible, you could resort to "Hole Punching", a technique that tricks NAT devices into allowing an "incoming" connection, with the help of a universally reachable third party. Taken from the linked article, the ...


2

I use Resilio Sync (formerly Bittorent Sync). It is free for non-business use and works extremely well with large files and multiple locations.


1

Yes, it's possible. That's actually how your LAN works the whole time. Packets within the same subnet are just directly relayed by the Wi-Fi access point (and/or by the Ethernet switch). They don't go through your ISP connection and don't rely on any of its services. For that matter, packets within the same subnet don't even need a router – you could create ...


1

Computers can be connected in a LAN so they can communicate with each other without an Internet connection. (In fact was developed first, with Internet coming later). When it comes to WIFI (at a basic level) you generally want a router to act as a central point, even if the router does not connect to the Internet. (There are other ways to do this but they ...


1

Two computers on the same network that can reach each other, can always communicate using any and all protocols, which includes P2P. The router is the connector of all the devices on the local network. If internet is available, it becomes the gateway to it. But in both cases, its behavior on the local network is exactly the same (firewalls permitting). ...


1

Yes, a malicious client can probe you, though your torrent software should return an error to them if you are not participating in the swarm that they are targeting. The common case here, is that you were participating in a swarm, and other clients have learned your IP. A malicious party enters the swarm, and gets your IP from another client. They then ...


1

Almost 5 months. Nobody wants to answer this? My 2 cents? All settings to default. Then try adding back one at at time. That said, however, just because your seed is connected to someone else's peer doesn't mean that peer is "requesting" or that all of its settings are correct to be able to get your blocks/pieces. Or the peer is doing just fine getting ...


1

If you just need to share 1 file use Teamviewer. Set up on both sides and use TV file sharing. It'll get the job done in fair fashion. It may not be the absolute fastest but it should be respectably fast relative to your internet connection and much easier than dealing with opening ports or setting up FTP or other servers on either end.


1

Dynamic IP addressing really isn't an issue. Most standard cable modems allow you to set up port forwarding, and in nearly 20 years of my own personal experience, your IP address from a cable ISP is likely to stay the same for months at a time, if not years. If you don't know what your external IP address is, there are many sites that can tell you, such as ...


1

Solving your problem without running into dynamic IP issues is using the cloud services you mentioned in your question. You just have to wait until the files are uploaded. The upload speed of 100 MBit/s is enough to use those (free) cloud services because normally they use only a small bandwidth between 500 kB/s and 2 MB/s. This seems to be independent from ...


1

A .torrent file is binary encoded, so you can't just parse out text from it. You would need to edit the file using a program to do it on your behalf (or I suppose you could edit the binary data by hand with a hex editor...). The .torrent data structure would allow you to divvy up the data you want to download, but only on a file boundary (eg you could not ...


1

That it worked for a week and then stopped working is a big factor. That suggests the device got moved into a different security group that's accessible over the wired network IP range (commonly known as the 'safe' or 'green' zone) but not addresses given to wireless users (the 'not company owned' or 'blue' zone), potentially following an SNMP trap scanner ...


1

Torrenting takes in mind that everyone in the swarm is seeding at least 1:1 ratio or more. Keeping that in mind, the best way is to seed as fast as you can without you having any problems with it until you reach your ratio. Reasoning behind this If the swarm is not healthy, there are only few people and thus upload is not quick anymay. They'll download ...


1

No. µTorrent is a software only specialized in handling torrent files. Flashget can handle torrents so if you want everything in one place, you can use that. See http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Comparison_of_download_managers#Protocol_support to find a tool that can handle all your protocol needs.


1

You must also take into account the number of connections per torrent and the total connections your bit torrent client will allow. This is based on the upload speed you enter when you set up your client. For example I have an upload speed of 20 Megabits per second or 2.5 MB/s (Megabytes per Second). My Vuze bit torrent client will Auto set me up with 130 ...


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