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47

If you need to improve the speed for sshfs connections, try these options: oauto_cache,reconnect,defer_permissions,noappledouble,nolocalcaches,no_readahead command would be: sshfs remote:/path/to/folder local -oauto_cache,reconnect,defer_permissions


27

Windows 8 makes it less easy to click shutdown or restart through a Remote Desktop session. If you: Click [Start Screen] > Settings > Power — you can only Disconnect. Type Ctrl+Alt+End — you gain Lock, Sign-out, Change Password and Task Manager. Right-click your User Account picture — you can Change Account Picture, Lock and Sign-out. ...


23

Typically, SSH terminal sessions hang if there are still background connections still open. By background connections, I mean things such as: X11 window forwarding STDOUT and STDERR Have a look at the connections that are still active on your hung SSH session by typing ~# in your hung SSH terminal. It could be that your script is opening sessions that you ...


23

Switch to the desktop and press AltF4. In the dialog that shows there will be a shutdown option.


21

from: http://mysteriousswede.blogspot.com/2012/01/mount-local-directory-to-server-on.html How to do it? You set up ssh forwarding by using port 10000 on the machine you log in on to port 22 on your local machine and use sshfs to mount in on the other side. F.ex. to mount /home/username/mywwwdevelstuff on your local machine to /var/www on the server side: ...


20

Besides already proposed solutions of using Samba/NFS, which are perfectly valid, you could also achieve some speed boost sticking with sshfs by using quicker encryption (authentication would be as safe as usual, but transfered data itself would be easier to decrypt) by supplying -o Ciphers=arcfour option to sshfs. It is especially useful if your machine has ...


19

You can use option ssh_command of sshfs to do the trick: sshfs ma: /mnt -o ssh_command='ssh -t mb ssh' Unmount with the usual fusermount -u /mnt Sorry this is 7 years late...


17

article here: Everyone seems to think that the \\tsclient\<drive> is a regular network share. But it is not! It's a feature of Terminal Services service. However, if you find yourself in the position where you must use the mapped drives for installing software, either copy the software first, or map the \\tsclient\<drive> first. ...


14

I do not have any alternatives to recommend, but I can provide suggestions for how to speed up sshfs: sshfs -o cache_timeout=115200 -o attr_timeout=115200 ... This should avoid some of the round trip requests when you are trying to read content or permissions for files that you already retrieved earlier in your session. sshfs simulates deletes and changes ...


12

Go to Remote Desktop Connection Manager -> Edit -> Properties -> Logon Credentials - Clear the Password. Then click Save or OK. You're good to go!


12

The reasoning behind this is if you are working from a remote computer and you shut it down, how do you turn it back on? It is a "Safty" feature to prevent a remote computer from becoming in a unuseable state. As for work arounds, shutdown really is the best way. You can always make a shortcut to the program with the command line arguments /s /t 0 included ...


12

This might help. Good luck typing all of it in correctly with no screen. Based on http://www.windows-commandline.com/enable-remote-desktop-command-line/ Press WINDOWS KEY+R to get a Run prompt Type cmd and hit Enter Verify you are in a Command Prompt window by pressing Ctrl+G and then hit Enter. If you hear a beep you've got a Command Prompt window open ...


11

You can use the Terminal Services query command for this. query session /server:remote_computer_name_here Note that you will need to set the following registry value on the remote computer: Key: HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\Control\Terminal Server Value Name: AllowRemoteRPC Value: 1 Type: REG_DWORD You could put the query command in a ...


10

You could use the Windows Sysinternals tool PSLoggedOn. Usage: psloggedon [- ] [-l] [-x] [\\computername | username] - Displays the supported options and the units of measurement used for output values. -l Shows only local logons instead of both local and network resource logons. -x Don't show logon times. \\computername Specifies the name of the ...


9

Try this: wmic.exe /node:"IP-or-HostName" ComputerSystem Get UserName Example: wmic.exe /node:"172.28.1.100" ComputerSystem Get UserName Output: UserName DOMAIN\User (Yes, /node value must be quoted)


9

I think you're looking for PsExec This is what you'd do to execute a CLI program on a remote computer using PsExec: psexec \\REMOTECOMPUTER "path_to_program_executable" You can learn more about PsExec and its various options along with some examples here


9

Remote Desktop Connection always locks the screen of the computer you remote into. If you need the computers physical screen to show what you are doing, you would need to look at a third party software such as VNC or Teamviewer.


8

Open the filename.rdg file with an XML editor (like notepad++) and remove all the credentials that are in between the <credentialsProfile> & </credentialsProfile> metadata tags for each user that you get this error for. Then save the file. When you open it the error message has gone. You can re-enter the existing domain, user and password ...


8

scp can be used both to copy to a remote machine, and from one: I assume you are used to using: scp localfile USER@REMOTE:remotefile But you can also use it to do: scp USER@REMOTE:remotefile localfile


8

There could be many reasons it stopped working. Without physical access it is impossible to know. However, based on your question this is a machine you set up at your families home. The first thing that comes to mind is the router's IP address changed. This is common for residential router's that use DHCP leases. Or perhaps the router got reset and the ...


7

Try the following in the command line from the remote machine, you may need to enable port forwarding on your router. scp <file on remote machine> ${SSH_CLIENT%% *}:<directory on local machine> Source: Easily scp a file back to the host you're connecting from (commandlinefu.com)


7

Sorry for the 3 years late answer, I became interested in this topic just now and found this question. I didn't find a documented solution anywhere, so I checked out the source code and here is a very relevant part: http://dxr.mozilla.org/mozilla-central/source/toolkit/xre/nsAppRunner.cpp#1537 Here, the nullptr at the end of the line unfortunately means ...


7

EDIT: Based on the information you added in the comments you fall under the first scenario. Even leaving it behind in the US with LogMeIn installed (which im not actually sure you can do without admin access) will not ensure your location being hidden. I don't believe it likely they will notice, it would have be one very vigilant system admin to catch you, ...


7

Found part of the answer, from http://aperiodic.net/screen/faq: put the following into the .screenrc file: termcapinfo xterm* ti@:te@ Doing this makes the local scrollbuffer contain the correct data, and on gnome-terminal, it's then possible to scroll using the slider on the edge of the window. You should probably make sure only to use a single tab per ...


7

You are already using great protocol for remote access (SSH). I would recommend you to use it for running commands remotely too. PuTTY you mentioned contains also a text console SSH client plink. If the remote scripts are not very interactive the best option would be to use plink: plink [options] [user@]host [command] If the script is highly interactive it ...


7

Fun fact: even remote repositories are on a branch. You're getting rejected because you're trying to delete the branch that your origin has currently "checked out". If you have direct access to the repo, you can just open up a shell bare repor directory and use good old git branch to see what branch origin is currently on. To change it to another branch, ...


7

I would suggest using psexec which is part of the SysInternals Suite. psexec \\remotemachine -u remoteuser -i -d cmd -c localdisk:\folder\batchfile.bat -c will copy from local path


6

I use Sysinternals psexec psexec \\targethost cmd will open a command prompt to the remote system. then just issue a shutdown command like 'shutdown \m' Here is the syntax guide for psexec: http://ss64.com/nt/psexec.html


6

Since you are networked, you could make a batch script with all the computer names to run the built in Windows command. shutdown -m \\COMPUTERNAME -f -t 00 That sends the shutdown command with the following switches: -m requires the "\IDENTIFIER", so that could be IP or computer name Add -r if you want reboot, -s for shutdown -f Forces running ...


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