New answers tagged

1

External IP address is used in communication with the outside world. Inside our own network you use internal IP address. As the connections from your office work, there's nothing wrong with the routing. For example; I have a Linux server I manage with SSH. The internal IP address of the server is 192.168.1.100/24. When I connect to it from the office, I'll ...


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I figured out the issue. The solution is to create a new MySQL user with the relevant privileges like so create user '<user>'@'192.168.1.%' identified by '<password>'; grant all privileges on *.* to '<user>'@'192.168.1.%' with grant option; And to change bind-address = 127.0.0.1 to bind-address = 0.0.0.0 in the my.cnf file (for me its path ...


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If the devices don't have a public IP address (and assuming you don't have special support from your telco), you cant do this directly. You will need an intermediary device with a public - ideally static IP. There are a few ways to do this. Likely the easiest way is to get both devices set up as VPN clients and use a service that can provide each client ...


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If an IP datagram is malformed (chechksum doesn't match, ...) the router should just drop it. It's job is to find where to forward incoming datagrams that make sense. But most routers (given that electronics is much, much more capable/performant today) take on more tasks. Like not forwarding datagrams with source addresses that come from the "wrong"...


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This is possible, and depending on your resources and budget there are many ways of achieving it. I would argue one of the easiest ways would (if you don't already have one) be to get an ethernet router capable of running dd-wrt or similar and setting this up as an OpenVPN server. You would either replace your existing router with this one, or set this ...


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So it seems @user1686 is right, it looks like there is a "hidden firewall". After installing Merlin-WRT all started working as expected, without any configuration changes.


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Remove/disable any static route in router 1 If posible show all the routing table of router 1. After that try to ping 192.168.1.201 from the PI It should work independently of having static routes. Now I notice that the PI connection is wireless. In some routers there are options to keep wireless clients isolated, specially in guest networks. It may be your ...


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Just to correct a misconception - it's not possible for a bridge to request an IP and forward it to a client. Only the client can request it. As per this discussion bridging Wi-Fi to Ethernet on Windows isn't possible. According to this Microsoft support question you can achieve this by applying static IP addressing to your bridge adapter and the clients. I ...


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Simple short answer SNR is Signal + Noise your internet was 8mb and now it's 12mb every time you upgrade your internet speed you will lose Signal strength


2

Instead of blacklisting people you don't like, enable Wireless MAC Filtering on the router and include in the whitelist all your devices, excluding all others. Disable MAC Filtering when you have guests, or include their MAC address in the permitted list. See the Archer C20 V5 User Guide, section "6.4. Wireless MAC Filtering".


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I had issues installing the switch, but I managed to fix it: Power off the modem Power off the switch. I think what resolved it, was powering off the switch and enabling the ports on the switch, one by one.


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In order for the website to be visible from the internet, you need to forward the traffic you send to your domain to the correct port of your PC. Only after that it is addressable from the Internet. If it is a standard http website you want to open, you will probably need to forward the external 8080 port from your router to the internal 8080 port of your PC....


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Yes it's an old thread, but... I just stumbled upon it and it begs for an alternative answer... In situations like this where the network is in the same house and you want to extend your network, you do not have to "cascade" with complicated setups. Simply turn OFF DHCP and the WAN port on the second, third, fourth router/WAPs and connect them via ...


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First of all as you seem to be interested in this topic, I will give you a general explanation of what you are trying to set up, as this will make it easier for me to write my answer and you are learning something in the process. What you are calling Router A in your question is in fact the only real router in your setup. The Router B will become (or is in ...


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I solved the problem, but I didn't post a satisfactory answer. Here it is, albeit a bit late. Both router and modem are running OpenWRT, so their physical ethernet ports can be reconfigured as needed. All the necessary configuration could be performed via OpenWRT's http(s) based config interface, LuCI: no direct editing of system files was needed. The modem ...


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Actually there is a solution without any firewall changes or VPN. The remotedesktop.com does actually work with zero knowledge.


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The landlord only has one ethernet cable coming from the ISP. If I connect the ISP cable, homeowner's router and the new renter's router to an unmanaged switch, then This depends on how the ISP hardware is setup. If it gives a single public IP to whatever is plugged in, this will not work. If the ISP provided equipment does NAT (ie. gives private addresses),...


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Your connection design would work if you have the option for multiple IP addresses from your ISP. If you only have access to one IP you could go with a VLAN solution but this is not an easy setup for a regular home user. Plus your hardware will need to support VLANS. You could add a router behind the landlords router (the same as adding a third router ...


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The device's manual interestingly doesn't have any information how to configure port forwarding. I don't have this router, so I can't say what's supposed to be on the Interface so I suppose that's the only available option, and thus correct. This is what rest of it means: SourceIpAddress - the public IP provided by your ISP InternalHost - static internal ...


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The Archer is an off-the-shelf SoHo Wi-Fi router. From the description it appears IP address 192.168.1.38 is applied to its WAN port. The WAN port is intended to be connected directly to the internet through the ISP:s router. Consequently the access to the management interface through the WAN port is by default disabled for security reasons. Otherwise if the ...


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As presented in the drawing, no. Firstly a standard ISP residential contract provides a single public IP address; more than that usually requires a substantially more expensive commercial contract. I am assuming this is also a standard residential contract, not a commercial one. If there's only one IP, it belongs to your router. Any device connected after ...


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In addition, he doesn't want a centralized logging of network traffic like most home modem and routers do. But they generally don't... (Many home routers literally don't even have the resources for that. (CPU requirements aside, where would they store those logs if the OS alone barely fits in the flash chip?) Yes, your layout would create two separate ...


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Th Canon LBP2900B is a CAPT printer. That is Canon's way of saying it does not support a printer language (PDL) but instead relies on the host PC's graphics engine to convert the page into dots on the paper. These type of printers are hard to network. The best way is to share them from a PC - which then has to be on whenever anyone wants to print. The other ...


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I don't know the TL-WR840N, but there is a possibility that if both sides of the router are in the same IP range, the router stops routing and acts as a simple switch. If that happens, the ISP router will be serving DHCP to your clients. First, you want to make sure that the devices you want to control are talking to the TP-Link rather than the ISP router. ...


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So do I understand correctly - you're connecting some random USB-Ethernet adapter to the printer, and wire from there to the router? Does the printer natively support Ethernet connection over USB port? As is I doubt this has any chance of succeeding. The reason is standards and protocols - Ethernet works on 802.3, USB doesn't. It's like you tried to instruct ...


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According to the manual for your specified printer, it is not a wireless printer. This leaves only one option remaining, as your router does not have USB utility. Wireless print servers are effectively replacements for the computer you don't want to have connected and leave on. It's a device connected to power (obviously) and to your printer via the standard ...


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The router (TP-Link's TL-WR840N) is connected to a switch, which is connected to the ISP provided router. Try connecting the router to the ISP modem and leave out the switch. Update the Firmware in your Router to the latest firmware. Do a Factory Reset, and then set up the connection to the ISP modem and wireless access again. If all of the above fails ...


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If you are talking about your home or office WIFI router, then you should take a follow up of following few points: Change the default IP Address scheme of the modem/router Change the default username / password details and apply a complex one. You should check for the different access methods like telnet/ssh, these should be disabled. Some of the devices ...


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There is one very important tid bit of information missing in T.B post above. To get ssh working on ausus merlin 386.3_2 and most likely other releases "One Has To Enable the Jiffs Partition in the router. I only enabled Jiffs but did not format it because there are config files etc there already and they might become another headache if deleted. Enable ...


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In my experience this is usually a no-go. Exactly the same routers are commercially available, but many of the options in their firmwares are stripped off from ISP routers - and there's usually no way even to upgrade the FW. Replacing them with other, even technically superior devices is also not possible. One reason is simply practicality. A hopeful user ...


1

You can connect to the router (best bet is to use a cable) and rummage around in it's configuration. Most of those can be reconfigured by the user, download the relevant manual and study it. Some ISPs (like mine here) gives you a box with very limited end-user configurability. Your mileage may vary. The connection of the router to the wider Internet shouldn'...


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As nobody else is taking a shot at this... The ad-hoc network is a separate WiFi network the moncular is broadcasting. You haven't specified what exactly is "router", but by the way you frame the question I assume it's a WiFi router. In that case it is bcasting its own WiFi network and no, you cannot connect one to the other. I'm also extremely ...


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No. There are a number of partial solutions and answers, but the last sentence - masking your home IP and not routing traffic via VPS without additional resources - is not doable. Have you considered getting a VPN with a static IP (its a thing, and not uncommon, but a different use case to what most people think of). The cost of this is comparatively low (US$...


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what kind of material do I need to make this system works with ethernet ? A switch will do. Any switch, managed or unmanaged, Fast Ethernet or Gigabit (depending on the RPi models and your speed requirements). Just make sure that it's got enough ports. If you're looking for plug & play, get a simple, unmanaged switch. Managed switches need to be ...


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It's not hard to do, but right now the firmware is only available in Chinese. Before you set it up, make sure you connect the AX6000 to your network using either port 1 or port 2 (which one doesn't matter since they're adaptive). Then connect the power and connect to it either wirelessly or using an ethernet cable. Once connected you'd be redirected to ...


2

The intensity of a radio signal follows inverse square law. The further the distance, the weaker the signal. Transmit power = how strong a signal a device can generate. 20dBm > 10dBm, consequently device generating a 20dBm signal transmits further than a device generating a 10dBm signal. Reception sensitivity = how weak a signal a device can detect. -...


1

A packet with a forged source address isn't malformed; it's well formed syntactically. So no router would drop it as "malformed". If the forged source address violates ingress or egress filtering rules - for example, if you send a packet with a 192.168.x.y source address to the outside interface of a NAT device which uses 192.168.x on the inside - ...


1

Usually the ISP sets up it's network so the connected subscribers are shielded from each other. But that depends on the ISP so you will have to ask your ISP to make sure. Other then that, if you don't have a public IP address or a NAT IP address that has port forward enabled you should be fine. If not your PC can be accessed from the internet, unless you ...


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It was because I got a hard drive that was not on the supported hard drive list. I returned what I got and got one from the list and it works! Amazon recommended a specific drive next to the product, so I got that... Didn't work! Lesson learned.


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I've recently got one of these wdr4300 v1.7 as a hand me down from a friend, and it was on openwrt, tried to flash the stock fw into it within the openwrt web interface. It didn't like that and bricked. It didn't brick in 'bootloop' but it turns on and only lights on are power (fixed, not flashing) and lan on the port the cable is plugged. Tried a lot of ...


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SMB Ports (File Sharing) Protocol: tcp/udp Ports: 137 netbios-ns 138 netbios-dgm 139 netbios-ssn 445 smb-ds See picture below 👇👇👇 murus smb ports Hope this helps 👍


3

The most secure way of doing what you want to achieve would be to use another device such as a Raspberry PI in your local network, set up a vpn e.g. with OpenVPN and then connect a VPN client from your remote computer to the running server on the PI. With this solution, you now have a secure connection that needs an authentication, so you only will be able ...


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Try to check in the DHCP Settings if there is an IP Reservation option. Usually under Net > LAN. I guess that we are talking about a modem-router.


2

The WAN port of a router is the port that provide it access to the internet. The LAN ports are what provide its network to the clients. So the WAN port goes into the wall outlet, and your pc goes into the LAN port. Then refer to the manual on how to access and configure the DHCP of that router if it isn't enabled already by default. Once you got it setup ...


1

DDNS gives a name to an IP Address. Given that you want to connect to the WAN Ip Address (the IP Address given by the internet provider) you need to setup the DDNS on the main router for the entire building. If you were to setup DDNS on your 2nd local router, the following scenario would happen. [Internet] ⬇ [Main Router] Wan IP: 123.45.67.89, LAN range: ...


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There is no easy solution with the connectivity you have in place. Option # 1 is to use a 3rd party solution to get access to your devices. Google Chrome Remote Desktop or WebEx Anywhere will provide you with this access. Option # 2 would be to invest in a separate Internet connection which will give you a public IP address. I do not know about the prepaid ...


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I've been brainstorming over this issue and I've figured out what's going wrong. A packet, first, goes through the mangle table, then goes to the nat table to have the nat rules applied on the packet (I use MASQUERADE for that). We can easily differentiate traffic coming from 10.10.10.214 and make it bypass the transparent proxy: iptables -t mangle -I ...


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