New answers tagged

1

Once any node in your local network is infected, the whole network is compromised. As all external communications pass through the main router, you are open to attack. These attacks are called Man-in-the-middle attacks and can bypass HTTPS protections, steal passwords and much more. If you suspect your router of being infected, factory reset it. Check also ...


1

Short answer, nope... There is no reason for a router to cut you off on 100mbit, so it is more likely that either, the internet itself has a maximum of 100mbit, or the router cannot do more than 100mbit. For example older routers may not have a strong enough cpu inside to direct more than 100mbit of traffic, so it will be limited to that amount regardless of ...


0

Devices will sometimes select a lower transmission rate based on the quality of the connection (or to save power), but ultimately the quality of the connection has many factors, the 3 most important are: the wireless standard used the frequency used the distance between the router and the device If you can't move the devices closer to the access point (...


0

It is possible for multiple unrelated IP subnets to coexist on the same physical link. By default they don't interact with each other (there's no L2 separation between them, but the hosts simply aren't aware of the other subnets), although most operating systems can be told about additional subnets on the same link if necessary. So the modem's management ...


1

You don't have to specify all those values anywhere. The only thing you do have to is username/password pair. CURL takes care of computing the client response for you. This is exactly what "supporting of digest authentication" means for any client. answer by user Alexey R. from stack over flow in addition by a user on another site the command ...


0

What leads you to believe that 192.168.0.1 is your gateway? Can you check on your PC if youre getting a DHCP lease (not the one from your ISP).


0

This is possible and the algorithm for source address selection is detailed in rfc6724. The question to be asked is why do you want that specific address to be used? Depending on your intention there might be better approaches (e.g. the use of temporary addresses). To conclude there are two ways of achieving this, please note their precedencd according to ...


3

Yes, most definitely. It is absolutely possible for malware to spread through your LAN to your computer. In fact, I’ve heard horror stories of malware that makes it past one person’s defenses to infect a single machine … and from that machine, move on to infect an entire small business’s network. While most malware these days has to be “invited” in – by ...


1

The only potential security issue is with any configuration settings you have configured in the router, which may identify domains and IP addresses associated with you or your organization, and may contain user credentials including passwords. However, as long as you perform a factory reset on your router, you will clear all such settings, so there should be ...


2

If you are interested in having a constant way of being found from the general internet, you may consider using a service like https://dyndns.org. This provides an address (like mywebsite.dyndns.org) that will be translated to an IP address when a host looks up the address.


0

Sounds like you may have intermittent packet loss. To check this, you need a permanent monitoring solution, like SmokePing. You could target Google DNS and Cloudflare DNS with this monitoring system. They are highly available. It’ll look somewhat like this: (As you can see, I have quite some packet loss to Google DNS every now and then.) You can run this ...


0

When using Digest authentication, you need to send an HTTP "Authorization" header, and this header is where the nonce etc should go. However, Digest uses a challenge/response mechanism that requires the Authorization header to be sent in a second HTTP request, rather than in the original HTTP request. The second HTTP request can only be sent once ...


0

Can you put the mesh on the same subnet as Ethernet? I did that with my Ubiquiti Access point and wired and wireless all play together. To do this, log into the Mesh Setup and look in the LAN section. Set this so that everything is on the same network. Then your devices should play together.


0

You could do an IP scan using Advanced IP Scanner. It is free and safe. I use it all the time. Configure it to scan the network computer 1 is on-> find an available IP address-> configure computer 2 to use the available address, subnet mask and default gateway. That will put both computers on the same network. There MAY be some restrictions that will ...


0

your configuration is right check if A and B are in same vlan if you have configured, otherwise there cannot be any other reason for this kind of issue according to me, if you find the answer please let me know


0

With no router access to enable port forwarding, your router is going to block everything not going over the ports that it has whitelisted. Normally only 80,8080,993,465, etc. Your only option is to use a VPN to route over an open port and let the service on the other end handle it. Some VPN services offer hosted servers that can help you achieve all this, ...


0

What were you looking to host? What method are you using to connect the machine to the internet? Is this your network, or are you using somebody elses network? Many residential services do not offer a static IP. However it would be worth contacting your ISP -- some provide it, others may provide it as an optional add-on. DynDNS services can be found ...


0

I'm assuming these computers are not next to each other so they are connecting to different Wifi networks or hotspots. the "host" part of their IPv4 Address is the same. The way to make this happen over two distinct networks you don't control--such as public Wifi or a cellular hotspot--is to use a VPN - as in a VPN that provides a virtual network ...


1

Your bandwidth is typical of VDSL profiles 12a and 12b. Your ISP is probably using a Fiber to the Node (FTTN) deployment, where profiles 8a-8b and 12a-12b are usually taken to be ideal. The fiber node in your case is likely a street cabinet, connected over a fiber optic line from the exchange. From there the connection is done over the existing copper ...


0

I used to have one of these D-Links myself and had the same issues. There is an internal feature called Stateful Packet Inspection (SPI) in these routers. This is ON by default, but it is buggy and gradually fills the entire RAM of the router, causing it to stop forwarding traffic. When that happens you either have to disconnect the WAN port (which resets ...


1

Your router doesn't support telnet. Most don't. I don't see any mention of telnet in its user manual. Telnet is a security risk, because it is not encrypted. Some routers support SSH instead, but even that is fairly rare. Vendors don't want the tech support hassle of full shell access, and providing shell access or a custom CLI doesn't help sell more routers ...


0

Whether you agree or not does not change the fact that Bridge Mode ABSOLUTELY DOES NOT DISABLE WiFi. As a matter of fact, I used the bridge mode on my old Cisco-Linksys EA4500 to turn it into a WAP! It functions beautifully as a WAP. Bridge Mode basically gave me a 4 port switch plus WAP. It leaves the DHCP up to my Cisco-Linksys EA9200 which does the ...


0

From your question and comments you should change your router configuration. The problems you are having stem from having 2 routers in your network, where the second one is segmenting your network making communication less seemless. The answer is to convert router B to an AP (access point) so that there is only 1 router - which means all the devices can talk ...


1

Okay, so from your comments I take it you actually want a single network, but you accidentally created two (somewhat) isolated networks. To change this, router B needs to be reconfigured to work as an Wi-Fi Access Point. Disconnect router B from router A. Log in to router B’s configuration interface. Change router B’s IP address so it is in router A’s ...


0

I was finally able to use OpenDNS to solve the issue for me. It is not 100% secure and a skilled person can easily dodge/disarm the setup. If like me, your kid(s) are young and aren't too tech savvy, this may provide just enough security. Procedure is to setup a (free) OpenDNS account at OpenDNS and then change your machine's IPv4 properties to use their ...


0

" Once disconnected it won't reconnect for 15-20 mins, .... once disconnected, it also shows message "bad password"" Reset to factory specs to eliminate the (possibly) defective wireless profile in the machine. Then update the firmware in the router and set it up again. Follow up: This was a new router because the old router had a ...


0

It sounds like the Netgear has an ip-address configured (probably 192.168.1.1) that conflicts with the ip-address of your router (Asus touters uses by default 192.168.1.1 as well). Tell-tale sign of this is that your computers still have connection (link-leds are on) but there is no communication possible. Reset the Netgear to factory defaults. Then it ...


0

BUT, how could the router identifies a finished connection and remove it safely? For TCP/SCTP, it reacts to the usual "connection close" messages (FIN or RST) that TCP endpoints send to each other. (And there is usually also an idle timeout, e.g. idle connections will be forgotten after 7 days even if a close message wasn't seen.) For UDP/ICMP/etc....


-1

First You have to check IP Series on Both Router. Both Router Shouldn't use the Same IP Series. if your Main Router (A) is Using the Ip Series Example 192.168.0.1 and Another Router (B) is Using the IP Series 192.168.1.1 then You Have to Find Your Desktop (Router B Connected) ip Address. then Ping That IP Address from your (A Connected) Desktop using CMD. ...


1

I'd recommend the following; using a firewall as they are intended for applications like these. Connect a firewall behind your modem, and use that as your primary router. On this firewall, configure 3 zones, Internet, Home and Tenant. Then you can easily configure the firewall to allow traffic to and from the Internet to both zones, but not between the ...


0

The M and O flags are mostly advisory. Some operating systems don't try DHCPv6 unless those flags are set, some try anyway regardless of the flags, and some never try DHCPv6 at all (looking at you Android)


3

Traceroute results correspond to whole routers, not their individual interfaces. Even though a router has multiple IP addresses on various interfaces, it will always produce only one trace reply. When doing so, the router will usually send that reply using an address from whichever interface the original request arrived through – in this case the LAN ...


0

So do I have the option of connecting more than 1 cable to this modem, or will all my connections have to pass trough the provider router first? You would need to add a Router to the Modem. Bridge it so the router gets internet. Then you can distribute wires from it to sites in your house. So the answer to your question is, Yes, you need a router (to ...


0

in addition to what @gaddman (thanks mate)said.... here is some info that sure will help anyone coming across this problem. if you are doing it manually then mostly the request is made in this way (i am using curl for the job) curl "(here you type the device ip and upnp port + control url of the config you want make that you sure will find using tools ...


0

You've got smart quotes around the schema in 1.xml, correct those first (unless that's just from pasting here).


1

You're not measuring latency. You're measuring the time to send 65,500 bytes twice. Let's say your wireless connection has a useful transfer rate of 18Mbps. That's a pretty realistic rate. To send 65,500 bytes twice would require sending 65,500 X 8 X 2 bits, or 1,048,000 bits. At 18Mbps that would take 1,048,000 / 18,000,000 seconds or 58 milliseconds. That'...


-1

I was having the same problem, but I solved it by using IP adress in the host field


0

The cable you found doesn't specifically mention how it can be used. However, other cables of the same type are better advertised, but as cable extenders for ADSL, not for internet. One example from Amazon is: RJ11 to RJ45 Cable 3ft Ethernet Modem Data Telephone ASDL Patch Lead Broadband High Speed Internet Plug 6P4C to 8P8C Flat Network Extension Cord ...


4

If you mean directly connecting the phone line to your Ethernet router, no it won't work. You might even damage your router! DSL has voltages, rates and protocols which are completely incompatible with Ethernet. You need an DSL modem to convert the DSL signal to an Ethernet signal, which you can then feed into your Ethernet router.


0

A router by definition has an interface on two subnets. An ISP-provided router will have an interface on its network and your network. When you have a NIC on someone's network you can: Try to get a DHCP address to discover subnet. Run a rogue DHCP server yourself and get machines using a different DNS server and possibly record/redirect traffic through ...


0

Demand that they limit the router to NAT and possibly a DHCP server to serve you. Then get your own router and set it to get ONE DHCP lease (=one IP) from their equipment (from their router or from a DHCP server outside it). After that you're free to use your router's firewall, NAT and whatever more as protection against the <fill in nasty words here> ...


0

I've been having similar issues... I found switching browsers helped. My usual browser is Chrome, but Edge worked for me to access the admin interface.


1

This will never work well. Problem 1: Basically you have 2 independent access-points, that don't know about each other. (That they also happen to be routers is irrelevant for the Wifi perspective.) Roaming between them will never work. In order to have proper roaming you need either a mesh of AP's or a central controller with AP's. You have neither. Problem ...


0

You've given a textbook description of the major symptoms of a well-known design flaw in modems/routers/gateways/APs, known as bufferbloat. It's very common, especially on DSL. The obsolete scheduling strategies your D-Link supports won't help. Prioritizing your gaming traffic over other traffic just shovels the problem into someone else's lap, and even that ...


0

If you have no access to main router to configure port forwarding inside a machine for VPN then you can use Softehter to connect remote users without any need of port forwarding on router end. First install softether inside any machine either windows 10,7 etc. The PC must have internet access user this website for configuration https://proprivacy.com/open-...


1

There are a few concepts to consider here. First note that if you don't have access to the device directly connected to the ISP network, you have absolutely no means to change your public IP address. If you do have some degree of access, note that IP addresses are leased by the DHCP server to a device for a period of time. that lease is monitored on the DHCP ...


0

Hey buddy as you mentioned it might just be a problem with your ISP. Just try contacting them via helpline number and tell them this problem. I also suffered from the same problem recently and technician came and changed my connection line and from that day my Internet is working flawlessly. Hope it helps.


0

If you have windows 7 (for some reason it was the only version of windows that had proper support for it), it has a LLTD tool built in, that you can access from "full map" in network settings. I have a question asking for it on newer versions that shows the UI. It'll even show a network device that's got no IP (intentionally or otherwise)


2

Get a wireless USB Hub (there are many of these). Set up the Wireless on your network and attach the Printer to the USB Hub. Reinstall the Printer Driver to be sure it picks up the printer. Here is a general Tutorial to assist you. Google for one of the many such hubs. https://www.net-usb.com/usb-over-wi-fi/wireless-usb-hub/ Here is a New Egg suggestion ...


0

Nirsoft's WifiInfoView might help you with that. Make sure the AP is not getting interferences from other APs/channels.


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