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3

Wouldn't the SSL inspector needs to sign a certificate on the fly? Yes, this is the way it works. It will have its own CA trusted by the clients and then use this CA to issue new certificates on the fly. What if the attacker is the client and it generates a bunch of requests to rarely used sites? Would that bring down the SSL inspector? If the SSL ...


2

There's nothing wrong with Mac OS X. It is correctly reporting that the server's certificate has expired, because the server is indeed sending an expired certificate. but now Mac Mail is not updating the certificate although the certificate is renewed. Which I can see when I open strongstaff.de in Firefox and view the certificate information You're looking ...


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Chrome stores (caches) SSL certificates in the browser history. Instead of re-fetching them every time, Chrome reads them off the cache. In private mode the history is not used and nothing is saved to it, hence the new certificate is fetched. Source: this answer on ServerFault. EDIT: The caching is done to speed up the browsing experience, but my common ...


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I don't see anything to tell me whether or not those errors (bad certificate / handshake failure) are fatal, i.e., if the client certificate was required and the connection cannot continue without it. If an SSL alert is fatal or not depends on the AlertLevel send together with the alert. Unfortunately s_client does not show these information. Would this ...


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