27

If you are networking in any way with common networking interfaces you have MAC addresses whether you know it or not but you shouldn’t really have to worry about them. So, I understand your question but it’s still a bit confusing when you ask something like this: …I'm wondering if that is adequate or if I also need to assign them each a MAC address (...


20

Here are the exact commands required for Cecil's suggestion based on Windows 10's new dhcpstaticipcoexistence feature: Find out the interface name: netsh interface ipv4 show interface Enable dhcpstaticipcoexistence: netsh interface ipv4 set interface interface="interface name" dhcpstaticipcoexistence=enabled Add a static ip address to your interface ...


19

Finally DHCP and static IPs can be configured to co-exist on one NIC. This feature has landed in the Windows 10 Creators Update (1703). There is a new property called dhcpstaticipcoexistence in the netsh interface ipv4 set interface command, which can be set to enabled and this interface can be configured with multiple static IPs along with a DHCP-...


19

On the router I set a static IP 192.168.1.20 to Mac Addresse XYN:123 No you didn't, you created a DHCP reservation - these are different, though the outcome is the same. You will have an IP conflict that will result in degraded connectivity for one or both computers. Your colleague is roughly correct, though I have no idea what he means by "stealing ...


17

Using DHCP reservations offers you a sort of poor-man's IP address management solution. You can see and change IP addresses from a single console and makes it so you can see what addresses are available without having to resort to an Excel spreadsheet (or worse, a ping and pray system). That being said, many applications require a static IP. If the server ...


15

Now, does a Web server need a static IP address to register to the DNS server and point the location? No, the web server does not need a static IP. There are essentially three basic parts to hosting a website: The registrar (which updates the information for your site name -- ex. www.mysite.com) The Domain Name System (DNS) Server (which helps translate ...


13

On the router I set a static IP 192.168.1.20 to Mac Addresse XYN:123 Now a new device XXX:999, sets in its network card to always use addresse 192.168.1.20 I'm not sure about this naming schematic as it looks like more of a hostname:port combo than a mac address. Let's pretend that: on the DHCP Server you set a static reservation for xx:xx:xx:xx:xx:xx to ...


9

To expand grawity's answer (the equivalent to private ranges are Unique Local Addresses, RFC 4913), here is how to pick the actual address to use. With IPv4 private ranges like 192.168.X., you randomly pick the value for X, but only get a few values to choose from (you picked 192.168.0.), and then pick a random number for the machine (you picked 99). You ...


9

I wrote a small batch-file. You can test to see if it works in your situation. (here it works fine) It will set your interface back to DHCP. After that it will extract IP, Subnet Mask, Default Gateway and the first DNS-server. This is the difficult bit. Especially if you have multiple interfaces. If it doesn't work we need to fiddle here a bit to get it to ...


8

A static IP is exactly the opposite of what a DHCP server handles. You may have a static IP stored in your devices settings, without knowing the device, OS etc, I can't advise how to check. I don't believe the following is what you're asking, but for clarification if anyone else stumbles upon this: DHCP servers will allocate an IP address to a certain ...


7

Everything in your question is completely wrong. My goal is to be able to ssh into any machine behind home-net without resorting to ugly port-forwarding and port mappings. The only way around this is to have multiple public IP addresses. If you only have a single IP as is typical for residential ISP connections, you must resort to port forwarding. But, ...


7

Reading between the lines - as you appear to have some confusion as to how IP Addresses actually work - then the simple answer is No. You computer's IP Address is never going to be exposed to the outside world. You will always be connected through some routing device somewhere - whether that's at home or in a coffee shop. In order to be able to connect to ...


6

You can configure both the OSes to ask for static IPs instead of the router assigning static IP addresses based on their MAC addresses. This can be achieved by configuring the respective operating systems' network settings, and have both of them ask for different static IPs. In Windows, these settings can be found in Network and Sharing Center. In Linux ...


6

What you want to do is use a Bridged network--not NAT. Let's assume you have a Windows 10 host and VMWare Workstation 12 with multiple Windows guest machines (in principle, the advice here should apply to other non-Windows guest OSs and to recent versions of VMWare below VMWare 12). Also, I'll assume that you want each virtual machine to have its own IP ...


5

If I'm understanding your proposed solution correctly, the answer is no, this will not work unless you port forward ssh. Even if you got the home-net IPs, they would be unroutable from the external client's perspective, because they are not publicly routable addresses. Your client could format a packet with a home-net IP as the destination, but the first ...


5

TLDR: No, you can't. If you have a static IP address from your ISP, they don't usually have a way of assigning that address to your hardware, often because they don't know what hardware you might have and they don't have the ability to change its settings. That's why they tell you what the address is and you need to assign it yourself. However, within the ...


5

First of all, NetworkManager's requirements are exactly the same as just about every other OS, ever. Windows requires you to enter a subnet mask; macOS requires you to enter a subnet mask; and likewise NetworkManager requires you to enter a subnet mask. The only difference is that NM prefers the netmask to be in CIDR "prefix length" shorthand ...


4

A static IP is usually just as secure as a dynamic IP, though a lot depends on: How 'dynamic' is the 'dynamic IP`. Over here (NL) a dynamic IP often stays the same for many months, or even years. In that case the difference is moot. Are you using a proxy or a VPN? If not your IP will show up in all communications with the outside world. Both if you have a ...


4

I think a dynamic IP is not more secure than a fixed one because probably nobody will try to find you specifically but any IP that answers. This can be your fixed IP or your Dynamic IP (if you open the ports and have servers behind them like ssh). The unique difference is that your machine will always answer on the same IP so the attacker theoretically has ...


4

The simplest solution would be to always use a static IP address that's outside your first AP's DHCP range. From the sounds of it, there's no reason your computer needs to actually switch IP addresses (unless you've left something out.) Other than that, you could write yourself a couple simple batch scripts to switch the settings. For static IP: netsh ...


4

This is possible by matching DHCP option 60, “Vendor class identifier”. Microsoft operating systems will send a string starting with “MSFT”. Official documentation is also available. Windows 8 still sends “MSFT 5.0”, by the way. You should be able to check for it with DNSMASQ (which I believe is what DD-WRT uses) like this: dhcp-match=set:windows,60,MSFT ...


4

Yes, but not exactly as you describe. In short, you're not asking to use the server as a router; you're actually asking to use it as a bridge/switch. Why Every router I've ever seen, no matter what LAN port you connect to, you can access it by the same IP address. [...] Obviously the WAN port is an exception to this. The configuration you describe is ...


4

A MAC address is a hardware identification number that uniquely identifies each device on a network. The MAC address is manufactured into every network card. Your Raspberry Pi has a MAC address built in from the factory if it has any kind of network card. You can't have a working IP address solution without having a MAC address layer under it. The MAC ...


4

Assuming that the ISP that provides a dynamic IP renews every 72 hours Renewing a dynamic IP address is not the same as changing a dynamic IP address. With good ISPs, even if you obtain the dynamic address using DHCP, then the same lease can be renewed again and again essentially forever – as long as the client router doesn't let it expire, it will keep ...


4

Most likely you're accessing those websites via IPv6, whereas your IPv4 configuration is actually completely broken. (Compare ping -4 www.google.com and ping -6 www.google.com. Many websites nowadays have an IPv6 address alongside the usual IPv4, and it usually has nothing to do with their popularity; often even small sites are behind CloudFlare which ...


3

You must change IP manually or with a script. You can also write a program that changes IP depending on network. Below is a batch script for that purpose netsh interface ip set address name="Local Area Connection" static 192.168.0.100 255.255.255.0 192.168.0.1 1 netsh interface ip set address "Local Area Connection" dhcp


3

If I read the question correct then you got a network like this: (LAN: 192.168.1.0/24) (1) (2) (3) 41.58.163.84/32 +--------+--------+--------+ /---------\ /----------INTERNET | | | | | | | PC1 PC2 PC3 Router ISP provided ...


3

One workaround could be to run a VM on the same machine and add a static IP to that VM. This will essentially provide a virtual adapter on the host but for the 10.x.v.z network. Custom Networking configufation simular to the one you are requesting is well docunmented here.


3

You can assign static ip to your device, just make sure its not in the dhcp range, as to avoid ip conflicts on your network. Your use of the dhcp reservations, works just as well if you can reserve an ip for a specified mac address.


3

The dhcp does not check what IP addresses are active on the network at starting time, therefore your setup will run fine. You are probably thinking of the case when your IP is already present on the network at the time of dhcp startup but the dhcp server only checks that at the time of request from a client. Even then, the server would refuse to offer that ...


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