19

I've done some investigation into this and found that there's probably no good way to prevent recent Dell laptops from throttling the CPU when it doesn't detect an OEM AC adapter (or one with a broken data pin.) Disabling SpeedStep or "additional sleep modes" or messing with the power profiles in the BIOS makes no difference. The "Intel Extreme Tuning" ...


14

I had the exact same problem. If I went under Task Manager > Performance, I found that CPU usage would not go over 30%, and the Speed was clocked down to 0.78GHz. At the bottom of the Performance tab there is a button to Open Resource Monitor. From here I found that Maximum Frequency was capped at 30%. (This should instead be showing at about 100%). This ...


14

GUI: Network Link Conditioner (preference pane, part of Apple's Developer Tools) Entonnoir (window, donationware) - Deprecated, no longer supported on modern MacOS speedlimit (preference pane, free as in beer) slowyapp (menuitem, payware) CLI (no port-specific filtering but can be adapted): OSx Bandwidth Throttler throttle.sh These tools rely on ports or ...


13

Vectorized code, especially AVX, naturally increases CPU heat output because the processor must operate at a higher voltage to execute these instructions. Small FFTs demand less memory than the blend mode, so the processor spends more time processing data and less time waiting for data. The x86-64 architecture provides extensive vector processing ...


10

I had exactly the same problem at a client today with a Windows 10, Dell Celeron Laptop. The machine took almost 30 minutes to open Outlook and was terribly slow in general. The CPU ran at 30% maximum utilization, at 0.48Ghz PERMANENTLY, every day. I noticed at the right bottom of the screen that although the laptop was plugged into power, the battery ...


8

I am surprised no one answered this. Yes this is possible, there are a couple ways of achieving what you are trying to do. in my experience, when you do this with roommates who are splitting costs with you, you end up being viewed as an internet connection dictator. There are three ways to do this. Content filtering - This would block all P2P on the ...


7

Old question, but I just got in the thick of a similar problem so I thought I'd reply. The problem is probably actually due to traffic shaping at your ISP. They aggressively prioritize traffic to known content providers in an effort to provide better streaming service to customers. I'd argue they've gone a little too far in some cases - I just diagnosed a ...


6

Yes. Most modern CPUs are designed to throttle to protect them from overheating. Laptop CPU SKUs are usually clocked lower than the identical desktop chip to allow for better battery life and lower cooling requirements. Your question is more about thermal management in any given form factor. The trend has been towards making laptops lighter and smaller. ...


5

It looks like your motherboard's voltage regulator module (VRM) is overheating. The VRM is responsible for converting 12V power from the power supply into the low voltages used by the processor. Because it needs to convert large amounts of power, it can get very hot under load. On this motherboard, the VRM temperature is listed as TMPIN1 in HWMonitor. While ...


5

tabs should never exceed 0.00% CPU usage for a period of 30 minutes after I leave a tab in the background. This is achieveable by setting the following entries in about:config dom.min_background_timeout_value 1,800,000 dom.min_tracking_background_timeout_value 1,800,000 dom.timeout.throttling_delay 1 According to the "Inactive tabs" section of the ...


4

In relation to the current developments for OS X 10.10, the ipfw executable commonly referred to, is no longer available. However, there is a pf executable, which can handle similar firewall configurations. There is a GUI interface called "Murus" (http://www.murusfirewall.com), which you can use for configuring pf. As far as I understand, it also actively ...


4

trickled uses the same technique to limit bandwidth as trickle. It just listens on a UNIX domain socket in /tmp for other trickle processes. When another trickle process starts up, it will ask trickled (if it is running) for the global settings, and set these as defaults, unless it has individual overrides for that specific instance of trickle. A fully ...


4

The throttling control is managed by the cpuspeed daemon on RedHat 6.5 You can stop the daemon: service cpuspeed stop This is not true that servers are only throttling when they are overheating, Cpu scaling change the cpu frequency by the server's workload, by default to minimum while the cpu is idle and to maximum when the there is a heavy workload. This ...


4

No. That IP just does a lousy job of locally generating ICMP errors. The proof is that points past it respond just fine. If there was something really wrong with that point, everything past it would be bad too. Routers are optimized for routing. Core routers let traffic pass through them in highly-optimized hardware pathways. However, when they have to ...


3

Is the high packet loss from that IP a sign that my ISP is trying to throttle speed and prevent connectivity? It could be a sign of throttling, but from what I am seeing I doubt that is the case based on where the packet loss is happening. But if it is not intermittent and happening continually, high packet loss like that is not normal. Read on. Is ...


3

To find the current CPU speed on all cores: cat /proc/cpuinfo | grep "cpu MHz" You can also check /sys/devices/system/cpu/cpufreq/policy{N}/scaling_max_freq and see if it is consistent with your CPU model. Other files in the same directories may be of interest (energy_performance_preference)


2

First thing I'd do is clean out the fans. If they are clogged with dust they will prevent the computer from adequately cooling itself.


2

check out this program: https://github.com/Sepero/temp-throttle it throttles the frequency of your cpu when it gets too hot, so that it doesn't overheat. once the temperature is below an acceptable level, it increases the frequency again. i tested it out, and it seems to work quite well. i haven't had any overheating issues, even on days where the ...


2

It's possible that your ISP is throttling certain types of traffic. If you have access to a VPN service (e.g. Private Internet Access, PureVPN, etc.), try connecting to Youtube or Netflix through the VPN tunnel. The traffic between your machine and the VPN server will be encrypted and will look like noise to your ISP, so if they are throttling based on ...


2

Here are several products that can control bandwidth and latency : Charles Web Debugging Proxy (shareware $50, trial version fully functional) The bandwidth may be throttled to any arbitrary bytes per second, and the latency to any arbitrary number of milliseconds. Network Simulator (free) Can define rules for traffic control, regarding bandwidth, latency, ...


2

You can use WANem to simulate a low-latency, limited-bandwidth connection. It can be used as a LiveCD app on some computer in your network and then you adjust the routes on your windows PC to go through it. You could probably run it as a VM and route your traffic through the virtual NIC. Check out the documentation link on their site and see the examples in ...


2

Net Limiter would probably do what you wanted. It will certainly chart how much data you use, both overall and by application, and you can filter the speed of individual applications. I honestly don't know if it would properly simulate a slow connection or not, but you would get a close approximation. A proxy server could do what you wanted too, however I ...


2

Possibly, but if you were being throttled by your ISP I would expect the entire link to be capped, not individual sessions. However, it shouldn't hurt to ask them if you are being throttled and why. Before that I would check if there's something on your connection using up your bandwidth. Some routers provide utilisation statistics per client IP. I would ...


2

considering the other specs, am I going to have a huge loss of performance due to throttling or will it be small/not really noticeable? There will be no notiocable throttling. Some background: 1) A PCI-e 3 card in a PCI-e 2 slot will simply work at up to max PCI-e 2 speeds. 2) Tests done a few years ago showed that most graphics cards do not need an ...


2

Here's an OS-independent program you can compile with a C compiler/GCC (so long as it has an implementation of asprintf available) and set to run automatically at system startup which should disable the throttling on these Intel-based laptops, I've used this successfully on a Dell Inspiron 5558 laptop running Xubuntu with root privilege for the program, with ...


2

It could be that your computer is under-clocking - specifically it may have a problem with heat build up. Have you attempted to clean the air intake fan ? Is the fan spinning ? Its also possible that the computer is bottlenecked (low memory, slow drive?) and thus is spending a lot of time waiting on IO so the CPU is down-clocked. In that case, you ...


2

Answering my own question, based on this question, but slightly changed for OSX: epoch () { date -v+$* "+%s" } interval () { INTERVAL="$*" WHEN_TO_RUN=0 while read LINE; do if (( $(epoch 0S) >= $WHEN_TO_RUN )) then echo $LINE WHEN_TO_RUN="$(epoch $INTERVAL)" fi done } which allows ... | interval ...


2

Yes, laptops and desktops are designed to throttle on several computational aspects: Thermal throttling : Reduce CPU speed due to heat, which is why all modern CPUs and motherboards incorporate abundant thermal sensors, with matching support in the operating system. This behavior can be modified by settings in the operating system by controlling fans speed, ...


2

For more complex workloads than the simple "throttle all timers a lot": namely, letting timers run more frequently if they are short, there is also a timer budgeting mechanism in Firefox. This budgeting mechanism only allows timers to run if there is a 'budget' for it, which is decreased by the amount of time timers in a tab spend running, and ...


2

These are two different numbers that you are comparing. The Task Manager is showing under CPU Usage the number of CPU cores that are being used. The 100% means that all of your four cores are being used, none is idle. The setting of "Maximum processor state" is found under "Processor power management", so relates to how much power the CPU draws. Since you ...


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